Suzanne Hogan


Suzanne Hogan graduated from the College of Santa Fe in New Mexico, with degrees in Political Science and Documentary Studies. Her interests include Latin American politics, immigration and storytelling in a variety of mediums including photography, film/video and writing. 

After college, Suzanne moved back to her hometown, Kansas City and was the Producer for The Walt Bodine Show for about two years. Now she serves as a part-time announcer, producer, and contributing reporter, filling in around the station wherever she can. Suzanne is also a founding member of the 816 Bicycle Collective, a recycle a bicycle program in Kansas City.

In her spare time, Suzanne  plays bass in a punk rock band, enjoys spontaneous traveling, and riding her bicycle all around town.

Ways to Connect

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

This story first appeared on KCUR's Question Quest. You can find the episode here or wherever you download podcasts.

In this episode, Suzanne sifts through legend and superstition to find the true story behind the Black Angel in Iowa City, Iowa. 

In this episode, Cody and Suzanne hit the road to find out what's in the center of the United States. 

In this episode, Suzanne digs into the sacred geometry and mysterious happenings surrounding a giant octagon in Belton, Missouri. 

In this episode, Cody dives into a strange mix of karaoke, theater nerdery and artist subcultures to find out what happened to an odd roadhouse bar in Kansas City, Kansas.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

This story first appeared on KCUR's Question Quest. You can find the episode here or wherever you download podcasts.

Lots of people have stores they remember going to when they were a kid— for you maybe it was the video store, the arcade, a comic shop, an ice cream stand or corner store.

In this episode, co-host Suzanne Hogan goes on her first quest to find out what happened to a zany skate and surf shop in Kansas that many remember fondly today. 

In the inaugural episode of Question Quest, co-host Cody Newill dives into the past to find out about a decrepit underground tunnel in Kansas City, Missouri, that's been long abandoned and is very hard to get into.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

It's been a good century in Missouri — if you're a river otter or an elk. But for red wolves and the white-tailed jackrabbit? Not so much.

With the recent release of The Wild Mammals of Missouri: Third Revised Edition, we invite a local natural history biologist to explore how our local animal populations have changed over time. 


Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

KCUR on Friday announced a new podcast Question Quest, launching in September.

Co-hosts Suzanne Hogan and Cody Newill will take turns scouring the Midwest for oddities, landmarks and just plain old strange things that make you ask, "What's up with that?" 

Starting in September, KCUR Studios brings you Question Quest, a podcast about everyday mysteries, curiosities and questions in the Midwest. Co-hosts Suzanne Hogan and Cody Newill will take turns sending each other on grand adventures to find the stories behind intriguing things. 

John Audobon marveled at its beauty; European princes crossed it in game safaris. Dan Flores’s American Serengeti tells the story of the Great Plains over the 19th Century, which saw the largest destruction of wildlife in modern history. 

We explore the historical ecology of the Great Plains. What have we lost, and what can we restore?


Neil Rudisill grows dozens of crops and raises chickens on a small plot in Kansas City's Ivanhoe neighborhood.
Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Urban farms and gardens are popping up in cities all over the country, often touted as the key to a sustainable lifestyle, as creating healthy vibrant communities and promoting economic development.

KCUR 89.3

Yesterday, we lost an esteemed colleague and friend here at KCUR. Steve Bell, our afternoon newscaster, collapsed on the job and passed away in the afternoon of July 18. We take some time to share memories of Steve.


  • Dan Verbeck, retired KCUR reporter
  • Patty Cahill, former KCUR general manager

These days, political discourse may feature the occasional soaring oratory, but more often, it comes down to talking heads yelling at each other. Maybe what the world needs now is the kind of politics found only in books. As we approach the 2016 presidential election, we take a moment to explore the best books about politics with KCUR's Bibliofiles.


For the past few years, UMKC professor and nuclear physicist Anthony Caruso has been working with his students to elevate a local physics experiment into a major project protecting national security. We ask him about his portable neutron-detection device, and how it works in real life applications.


Working For Fun

Jul 5, 2016
Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

We all have to work. But does your job have to be a daily grind, or can it be ... joyful? We check in with Kansas City native Cole Lindbergh, who worked his dream job as a games manager at Worlds of Fun for 12 years, and ask about how his life changed after he was profiled for This American Life in 2011.


Faith Bemiss / The Sedalia Democrat

In Sedalia, Missouri, Marge Harlan spent $25,000 of her own money to build a "slave cabin." While she meant the cabin to honor the courage and resilience of African-Americans, many in the community, especially people of color, have found the gesture problematic and offensive.

We ask, how do we commemorate history? What is the best way to remember a conflicted and painful past? And who gets to decide?


Last year, we asked our listeners to solve the Kansas School Funding Formula. As news develops around a potential public education shutdown in Kansas, we break out our calculators and enter the Kansas school funding debate. When legislators go back to Topeka next week, what will go into solving the state's toughest math problem?

From research to relationships, from the laboratory to the living room, there's a lot going on in the world of Alzheimer's. In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we share the voices of Alzheimer's patients, stories from caregivers and a progress report from a leading scientist. 


1992 is calling and it wants its cassette tapes back: a local record store can't keep tapes in stock, a St. Joseph pawn shop sells tape decks as quickly as they come in, and a Springfield-based cassette manufacturer just had its best year since 1969. Sounds like a cassette-tape revival to us.


Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

This spring, there's new life on the Missouri River - and it's more than buds on trees or fish in the water. 

Barge traffic may be on the verge of a renaissance.

At least that's the hope of Port KC, which reopened the Woodswether terminal in the West Bottoms last year. The facility, currently the only public port operating on the river, is receiving barges for the first time since 2007. 

Aubrey Fletcher knew she wanted to work on a dairy farm ever since she was a little girl.

"I do remember my mom asking, 'Are you sure that's what you want to do?' " Fletcher recalls. She knew the work would be tough — she grew up milking cows every day. But it's what she wanted.

So she and her husband's family collaborated to start Edgewood Creamery outside of Springfield, Mo., last August. They recently opened a storefront on the farm selling their milk and cheese.

Suzanne Hogan / For Harvest Public Media

Aubrey Fletcher knew she wanted to work on a dairy farm ever since she was a little girl.

“I do remember my mom asking, ‘Are you sure that’s what you want to do?’” Fletcher recalls.

Fletcher knew the work was tough, she grew up milking cows every day. After college she and her husband wanted to return to his family farm, but it wasn’t making financial sense.

“The farm couldn’t necessarily provide both of us with salaries,” says Fletcher. “So we thought, ‘Why not take our premium milk and take that a little further?’”

Now that simulated sky dives are a form of local entertainment, the time is right to ask: what's the difference between someone who jumps out of a plane for the joy of a free fall, and someone who considers that the opposite of fun? Sky-diving pros defend the appeal of their sport.



If you just want to watch the video: scroll down.

Like most people, I've had fun dreams about flying around through the air. But as a person who is generally scared of heights and gets nervous looking over the edges of balconies and roof tops, I never thought I'd actually want to jump out of an airplane and go sky diving. That is, until recently.

When I heard about the new iFLY facility in Overland Park, Kansas. I poked around on the internet and thought, Sky diving-lite? I can handle that.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

A hundred years ago, the North American Black Bear was thought to be completely wiped out of Missouri because of humans altering their habitat and over hunting for food and pelts.

But they've been making a comeback in Missouri. 

In 1958, something huge happened for black bears in our region. An Arkansas biologist made a deal with Minnesota and Canada, to trade wild turkeys for 254 black bears. Today, Arkansas has nearly 5,000 bears, and this has had an impact on Missouri.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

You may not think about where your chocolate comes from every time you take a bite, but one Missouri chocolate maker wants that to change.

Shawn Askinosie of Askinosie Chocolate in Springfield, Missouri is a "bean to bar" chocolate maker. Meaning he processes cocoa beans in his factory to make his chocolate bars. There are a lot of steps involved to turn cocoa beans into chocolate candy, all steps that Askinosie knew nothing about until 10 years ago.

"I had no idea where chocolate came from," Askinosie recalls. "No idea." 

As the time comes for old suburban developments to reinvent themselves, one community after another has questioned the conventional wisdom that big box stores are desirable anchors for retail. Is Kansas City part of a trend?