Suzanne Hogan

Announcer/Producer/Reporter

Suzanne Hogan graduated from the College of Santa Fe in New Mexico, with degrees in Political Science and Documentary Studies. Her interests include Latin American politics, immigration and storytelling in a variety of mediums including photography, film/video and writing. 

After college, Suzanne moved back to her hometown, Kansas City and was the Producer for The Walt Bodine Show for about two years. Now she serves as a part-time announcer, producer, and contributing reporter, filling in around the station wherever she can. Suzanne is also a founding member of the 816 Bicycle Collective, a recycle a bicycle program in Kansas City.

In her spare time, Suzanne  plays bass in a punk rock band, enjoys spontaneous traveling, and riding her bicycle all around town.

Ways to Connect

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2015 was the most successful year since 1969 for the nation's largest cassette tape manufacturer. We meet the founder of that company, based in Springfield, Missouri, and try to figure out why people are returning to cassettes.

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William Least Heat-Moon takes us on a trip across America's forgotten rural routes, through history, away from our digital devices and into the universe.

 

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Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Winding 10 miles north and south through the heart of Kansas City, Paseo Boulevard, or "The Paseo," is the longest and one of the oldest boulevards in the city. But before we had The Paseo, and all the other parkways and boulevards that have come to define the city, Kansas City was basically a congested metropolis that was hard to get around. 

The New York Times calls him "one of the most acclaimed travel writers of his time." In this encore presentation, a chat with William Least Heat-Moon about his Kansas City roots, his new novel and how he got his name.

Guest:

  • William Least Heat-Moon

The DLC / Flickr -- CC

Why is the Paseo Boulevard named after a street in Mexico? And how did this road help shape our city? We explore the history of what some people consider KC's first boulevard, and we find out what's in store for the future of this picturesque roadway.

Guests:

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR 89.3

Meet two violinists. One started Kansas City's tango scene before moving to Argentina, and the other is a prominent jazz fiddler. Then, hear the story behind the song, "Under the Sun."

Guests:

Courtesy of Gracie Schram

The artist: Gracie Schram

The song: Under The Sun

Background: Gracie Schram of Leawood, Kansas, has been writing songs since she was a little girl. She released her first album when she was 10 years old. And this past year has been busy and full of change. She graduated high school from Blue Valley North, released the album Dear Fall, and started college in Nashville, Tennessee.

The clowns are coming to town! That's right, there's a Clown Convention happening in the Northland this week. We check in with a few locals on the art and lifestyle of being a clown.

Plus, musician Greg Wickham joins us to talk about his new album "Almost to Springfield."

Guests:

GarrettTT / Flickr -- CC

When you flip a light switch or plug something into an outlet, something usually happens. Lights come on, iPhones get charged. But where does that energy come from in Kansas City? How are we using it, and what is the future of energy here?

Then, the story of Aldo Leopold, a Missourian and a passionate early writer about nature and conservation.

Guests:

Until recently, living in your parents' basement might have been viewed with some derision. Now, more families have been stacking two, three, even four generations under one roof. On this encore episode of Central Standard, we take a close look at the growth of multi-generational living in Kansas City. 

Guests:

Suzanne and Cody return with a follow-up episode to the "bird lady" statue in Kansas City's Brookside neighborhood. And this time, they've got all the answers.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

On average, each person in Kansas City throws away seven pounds of garbage every day, and, it turns out, 80% of that garbage is actually recyclable.

We check in on Kansas City's recycling program, revisit the easy steps, and hear how our city could be doing better.

Guests:

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City's curbside recycling program started in 2004. Since then, our diversion rates, as in the measurement of how much trash we are keeping from the landfills has stayed consistently around the in the 25-30 percent range. The goal is to reach an 80 percent diversion rate by 2020. We're a ways off, but regional experts remain optimistic. 

"We are recycling much more than the numbers show," says Marleen Leonce.

Doug Kerr / Flickr -- CC

It runs from Baltimore to Provo, Utah, and the 1985 World Series was nicknamed after it. And did you know that they started building the very first stretch of it in Missouri, but the first section to be completed was in Kansas? A look at how Kansas and Missouri have been shaped by I-70.

Plus, we hear from a woman who has driven a stretch of I-70 so much that she wrote a song about it.

 

Guests:

Jason Dailey / www.daileyimages.com/

The band: Heidi Gluck

The song: Sadness Is Psychedelic

The story: Singer-songwriter Heidi Gluck is originally from Canada; she now lives in Lawrence, Kansas. But before she settled there, she lived in Indiana where she was involved in a tight-knit musical scene. 

"We've gone through some life stuff together," says Gluck. "And we still make music together. So they've just been my musical family."

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

A few thousand folk musicians from around the world are preparing to gather at the Westin Hotel in Crown Center for the 29th annual Folk Alliance International Conference. Over the next five days they're going to make a lot of music, but they're also going to make a lot of paper flyers and garbage. But hopefully not as much as previous years.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

How are Russians living in our community reacting to the allegations that Russia hacked the 2016 U.S. presidential election? We explore the nuanced conflict and pride that Russians living in Kansas City feel about their homeland.

Guests:

Flannery Cashill

Many people pass by the unmarked statue of a woman at 52nd Street and Brookside Boulevard, every day perhaps without ever noticing the bird shenanigans taking place.

Around the base of the statue, which sits just off to the side of the popular Harry Wiggins Trolley Track Trail, there is a collection of small gifted birds. And the way that the statue is decorated with these birds seems to mysteriously change over time.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

In this special bonus live episode, Suzanne and Cody investigate why people keep leaving little bird figurines around a statue in the Brookside neighborhood of Kansas City, Missouri.

A portrait isn't just about capturing someone's literal likeness. It's about capturing the inner essence. So how is it done? And how is it done well? We host a roundtable discussion with Kansas City artists – from painter to doll-maker – to explore the ins and outs of portraiture in various mediums.

Guests: 

Rob Jefferson

Can you imagine what it would be like to regain your sense of hearing . . . after years of silence?

In this encore presentation of Central Standard, one man's story, as well as questions within the deaf community, about whether deafness is something that requires correction.

Plus, why Missourians need to start thinking about black bears.

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

When you picture a break-dancer, or "b-boy," you may envision a skinny kid who drops to the ground and pops back up like it's no big deal. But the hip-hop culture that gave rise to break-dancing isn't getting any younger.

Now, the original hip-hop generation is bringing kids to the club for events featuring crayons. In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we ask, how is the culture of hip-hop growing up with them? Plus, profiles of three icons in Kansas City's hip-hop scene. 

Paul Andrews

In this encore presentation of Central Standard, local artist and pastor Dylan Mortimer discusses his art, his faith and his battle with cystic fibrosis, which he faced head on in his exhibit last January called "Cure."

Guest:

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It's an especially good time of year for comfort food. It's cold out, and it's the holidays, when traditional, hearty, no-frills dishes show up on our tables. KCUR's Food Critics search out the best comforting dishes (outside of grandma's house) in and around KC.

Plus, one reporter's memories of Winstead's (and why you get one tater tot in your order of fries there), and a visit to Sugar Creek, where a former mayor and his wife throw an annual holiday party — a tradition that came with their hilltop house.

Guests:

Join Suzanne and Cody for Question Quest Live on Thursday, Dec. 15 at the Buffalo Room at the Westport Flea Market in Kansas City, Missouri. We'll be solving a new quest on stage, and hopefully we'll upload the audio here afterwards. Thanks!

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Do you remember when playgrounds were made out of wood and metal? Falling off the monkey bars onto gravel or concrete? And do you remember that switch, when it seemed like all of it was replaced with colorful plastic?

Well, adventure playgrounds, which have unique play elements and introduce more risks, are popping up more and more around the country and in Kansas City, bringing back some of those old-school vibes for a new generation.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City's Woodswether Terminal on the Missouri River has seen the last of its barge traffic for the year. Port KC reopened the public port in 2015 (it closed in 2007), and it looks as if 2016 has been a successful year.

The Army Corps of Engineers only guarantees enough water for navigation from April 1 to the end of November. Last year was an unseasonably warm winter, so the Woodswether Terminal had cargo moving in and out by barge as early as February. 

Paul Downey / Flickr - CC

Climate change is a global phenomenon, and when we think about climate change we tend to think about the greater global implications. Like how will increasing ocean temperatures affect glaciers and coastal communities? But how will climate change impact our local communities? How will Kansas City change? 

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

This story first appeared on KCUR's Question Quest. You can find the episode here or wherever you download podcasts.

In this episode, Suzanne sifts through legend and superstition to find the true story behind the Black Angel in Iowa City, Iowa. 

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