Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC, a political columnist for The Kansas City Star and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as the full-time political correspondent for The Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wis. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Composer, artist, software designer ... whatever you want to call him, R. Luke DuBois is a thinker. He's done a portrait of every president using only words from their State of the Union addresses, and employed a real gun and blank bullets to visualize every shooting in New Orleans, all with the aim of helping people better understand the world around them.

If you feel like your smartphone has a mind of it's own, it's not just you. After years of stacking new systems on top of generations of old technology, things have become so complicated no one really understands it. 

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Why is it the person we were head over heels for just a few months ago now seems a bit ... boring? Clinician and researcher Stan Tatkin says our brains are wired to kick into auto-pilot after a while, but it doesn't have to mean the end of the relationship.

Everyone hates stale potato chips, but that little annoyance was the inspiration  that got Mark Shaw thinking about how to reseal the bag. Since then, Shaw's been a prolific inventor and innovator whose nanotechnology work has revolutionized several industries. He says the key to unlocking the inventor's mindset is constantly looking for ways to create doors where there once were only walls.

Advocates for tighter gun laws might feel a little like believers in a lost cause, but researcher Daniel Webster holds out hope. The director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research says some proposals do have support from a majority of gun owners.

Before public officials in Platte County, Missouri, make a plan for spending tax dollars, they know it'll have to pass the muster of Ivan Foley, editor and publisher of The Landmark. That's why he was awarded the 2016 Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, tenacity and integrity in rural journalism.

The head of Missouri's public defender system appointed Gov. Jay Nixon to handle a case in protest of withheld funding. So, just how dire is the situation for Missouri's public defenders?

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Are we a society of bullies? We talk to two sociologists who make the case we can’t fix bullying in schools until we take a close look at the bigger institutional factors in America that encourage it.

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National startup activity has been dragging the last few years, but that is starting to change. We’ll learn how the country may finally be breaking free of the effects of the Great Recession. 

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In researching Topeka's Westboro Baptist Church, Arkansas State University sociologist Rebecca Barrett-Fox got an intimate view of the ministry's operations. Despite what most people think, Barrett-Fox found the congregation and its roots aren't that far off the beaten path.

It's hard to remember a time when voters were more frustrated with the Democratic and Republican options on offer. With the possibility of a banner year for the Greens and Libertarians, we look at the role and influence of third parties.

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Carlo Pascolini / thecountryduo.com

Kansas City's Kasey Rausch and Marco Pascolini are both veterans of the regional music scene. Combining their love of classic country standards with Rausch's folksy songbook, they've formed The Country Duo. The two were recently invited to Memphis to film an episode of PBS's "Sun Studio Sessions."

White Christians set the tone for this country, dating back to its founding. But that’s changing in some profound ways. For one thing, white Christians no longer comprise a majority of the nation. As the cultural and religious ground shifts under them we’ll see how their influence is changing.

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Last night's primary election was an exciting one on both sides of the state line. In Kansas, losses by several conservative Republicans caused a surprising swing to center. In Missouri, a bruising primary campaign for governor ended with Eric Greitens as the Republican nominee.

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farmprogress.com

Jerry Litton, a congressman from northern Missouri, died in 1976 … on the same night that he won the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate.  His death was an unspeakable tragedy for a man many thought would one day occupy the White House.

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Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

To say they know a little something about national politics would be an understatement: David Von Drehle, editor-at-large for TIME, and Mike Allen, chief White House correspondent for POLITICO, share their insights on the presidential race so far and what to expect from the rest of the election season.

These days, politicians who change their policy positions are called flip-floppers, but that epithet could easily apply to some of this country's most celebrated leaders. Journalist Larry Tye's book, Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon, illustrates the political evolution of Robert Kennedy.

  In this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors, joined by Angie Blumel of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault, wade through the controversy surrounding an editorial in The Kansas City Star that encouraged rape victims to "accept [their] role in what happened." We also look at the impact violent images in the media have, and whether or not the political process is "rigged" to exclude the wishes of regular voters.

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In Ancient Rome, members of the privileged elite communicated their wealth and status by adorning themselves and their homes with a variety of luxury goods. A new exhibit at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art showcases some of the most extraordinary pieces of the Empire. 

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Since 1983 Alfred Friendly Press has offered fellowships to journalists from developing countries and emerging markets to spend six months working at U.S. host news organizations.  Up to Date's Steve Kraske talks with three Fellows who remind us that freedom of the press is not a right to be taken for granted. 

 

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Plenty of parents know the struggle of dealing with a toddler or teenager who hasn't slept well, but few realize their own habits could be affecting their child's rest. On today's program, we explore when it's time to worry about your kid's nighttime routine.

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  • Dr. Kevin Smith is a clinical psychologist who works in pediatric sleep medicine at Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics.
  • Dr. Natasha Burgert is pediatrician at Pediatric Associates Kansas City.

Before a college ballplayer can make it to the Majors, they've got to prove to coaches, scouts, and most importantly themselves, that they have what it takes. The Clarinda A's baseball team, and the small Iowa town that hosts it, has the unlikely distinction of not just developing that kind of talent, but of fostering hard work, integrity and responsibility in the process.

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Things are moving ahead in the 18th & Vine district of Kansas City, Missouri, but not everyone is happy with the decisions being made. Last Wednesday, KCUR 89.3 partnered with The Call to host a forum about the future of the district, and we kept the microphones open for two hours. Here are highlights from that evening.

Click here to listen to the entire town hall forum. 

Two-time candidate for Kansas governor, radio pioneer and ... goat gland doctor? John Romulus Brinkley may not have been a real medical doctor but he was a helluva salesman. Filmmaker Penny Lane's latest documentary, NUTS!, explores the life of the 1920s flimflam man who became a millionaire "curing" impotence and built the most powerful radio station of its day.

This week, 655,000 medical records from three healthcare organizations, including one in Farmington, Missouri, were listed for sale on the "Darknet." As we hear of more and more big data breaches, what does this mean for individuals? And what’s the market for stolen health information?

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The Role Of Populism In 2016 Politics

Jun 30, 2016

Between Donald Trump and the Brexit, there is a wave of populism sweeping Western democracies this year. We explore what's behind it and who it represents. 

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  • Burdett Loomis is a political science professor at the University of Kansas. 
  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor in political science at the University of Kansas. 

The financial ripples from Britain's decision to leave the European Union were felt  on this side of the pond, leaving plenty of Americans wondering how the departure affects their monetary plans. While many details surrounding the split remain up in the air, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts have sage advice to keep skittish savers grounded.

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There is rarely unanimous agreement among the justices of the current Supreme Court of the United States, which means that for every majority opinion written, there is a dissenting one. We look at the influence dissenting opinions can have on future Supreme Court rulings.

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  • Edward Cantu is an associate professor at University of Missouri - Kansas City, School of Law.

We all remember the Titanic, but do you remember the Cap Arcona? The German luxury liner, regarded as the greatest ship since the Titanic, suffered a fate just as horrifying.

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The rebuilding of Joplin after a devastating tornado struck in 2011 was generally applauded as a textbook example of how to take care of people when disaster hits. However, homeowners and businesses on the East Coast are still struggling in the aftermath of 2012's Hurricane Sandy. 

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