Steve Kraske

Host of Up to Date

Steve Kraske is an associate teaching professor of journalism at UMKC and has hosted "Up to Date" since 2002. He worked as political correspondent for The Kansas City Star from 1994-2013 covering national, state and local campaigns. He also has covered the statehouses in Topeka and Jefferson City. From 2013-2016, he was a part-time columnist for The Star; he now serves on the newspaper's editorial board.

Before arriving in Kansas City, he worked at daily newspapers in Iowa and Illinois and at United Press International in Madison, Wisconsin. Kraske is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism. He was a 1992 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University.

Kraske has won awards for both his print and radio work and has appeared on NPR, CNN and Fox. He's a big fan of "Prairie Home Companion" and Kansas City jazz. His father lives in Stillwater, Minn., not far from the St. Croix River.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr Creative Commons

Earthquakes in the Central U.S. have been steadily increasing due to oil production, gas extraction and disposal of wastewater. Seismologist Heather DeShon tells us if it is possible to mitigate the number of occurrences. Then, finding political common ground between parties. Mark Gerzon, president of the Mediators Foundation, explores cross-party cooperation in his most recent book, The Reunited States of America.

Kansas City Fashion Week

Kansas City takes the nickname 'Paris of the Plains' seriously, and not just because of our fountains. Today, we learn why Kansas City Fashion Week has designers, photographers, models, makeup artists, and stylists gathered in the Heartland. Then, the director of the Vatican Observatory looks at the intersection of religion and science. He'll also answer an "age-old" question for us: Should extraterrestrials be baptized?

Platige Films

It's an exciting year for the Kansas City FilmFest. Today, we preview the high-profile guests coming to town, the inclusion of the Dog Film Festival, and the top Midwest films of the year, like Big Sonia.

Maj. Geoff Legler / Oklahoma National Guard

Donald Trump took over the Oval Office two months ago, and his trade policies are having an effect. Today, we'll find out how his search for better deals is creating divisions in Dawson County, Nebraska. Then, learn how building techniques, borrowed from construction practices in hurricane zones, can help Tornado Alley homes stand up to spring's strong winds.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As a former county lawmaker, teacher, community planner, advocate and volunteer, Mamie Hughes has had a lasting impact on Kansas City. Today, we look at life of one of the metro's most dedicated activists.

Then, we meet the enthusiastic conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, and ask what it's been like leading "America's Orchestra" for more than 20 years.

Writers Guild Foundation

Despite its shoestring budget and remarkably short shooting schedule, High Noon is revered among cinephiles. Today, author Glenn Frankel reveals how the 1952 film reflects the turbulent political climate of the Red Scare. Then: Buildings can affect our sleep, what we eat and how we feel.

Process Media

St. Patrick's Day Weekend is here! Wear your green proudly as Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critic Steve Walker leads you to a movie pot of gold at the end of the cinematic rainbow!

Steve Walker

Wolves, R

Typical sports movie clichés are superseded by a strong script, director, and cast (headed by Michael Shannon) telling a gritty story about a high school basketball phenom and his alcoholic, gambler father and enabling mother.

United States Mission Geneva / Wikimedia Commons--CC

The Band's legendary final performance was over 40 years ago, but their fame lives on. The hit group's lead guitarist, Robbie Robertson, shares stories from the time he wrote "The Weight" in one night to jamming with Bob Dylan.

Baylor University

Not every undocumented migrant crossing our southern border makes it. Remains of those who die in the attempt are found in the open and in unmarked graves. Meet the anthropologist using forensics to return skeletal remains to waiting families. Then KU's Lisa McLendon says "it's all about attitude" when it comes to grammar. Her passion for sentence structure and punctuation led her to write a workbook about it.

Phil Roeder / Wikimedia Commons

Warning: you may want to change your March Madness brackets.  We speak with the Kansas University professor who has developed a model to statistically predict the Final Four in the NCAA tournament. Then, we meet John Gibson, the new chairman of the Democratic Party in Kansas, and find out what makes him hopeful for his party in such a red state.

moneyinc.com

The replacement of the Affordable Care Act, is currently making its way through Congress. As President Trump has said, healthcare "is an unbelievably complex subject," and the American Health Care Act is certainly raising concerns from those covered by Obamacare. Today,  we take your questions on how existing coverage could be affected if the AHCA is passed.

Flickr-CC

It can be hard for parents to have a genuine talk with their teen-aged children without it ending up as awkward, emotional, or even worse, unproductive. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw discusses what is, and isn't, valid in a conversation with your teen.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump has referred to major media outlets such as The New York Times and CNN as "the enemy of the American people." But what does that unwanted title mean for journalists, and journalism itself, moving forward? We bring in the Media Critics to answer that one. Also, should a news outlet assign reporters based on race? Find out what our panel thinks about the recent lawsuit between a local reporter and television news station involving that very issue.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The saying "let's get the hell out of Dodge" exists for a reason. Back in its day, Dodge City, Kansas, was the roughest, toughest town people dared to stop in. Author Tom Clavin, used his obsession with the Wild West to write a book on how the city got its infamous reputation. Also, we speak with the new sheriff of Johnson County, Calvin Hayden, about how he's balancing the safety of his deputies with increasing staffing shortfalls and overtime pay.

Missouri Auditor's Office

Today, bestselling author and political activist Francine Prose shares her thoughts on the importance of the written word. She says the First Amendment is under threat, and explains why what we write counts now more than ever. Then, we speak with Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway, who says certain executive payments the University of Missouri System awards break the law.

Wikimedia Commons

The Vietnam War didn't end silently, it went out to the loud riffs of rock n' roll. Revisit the songs that shaped the 1960s and '70s, and captured the moods of soldiers overseas and civilians at home. We also find out how the electric guitar became the international symbol of freedom, danger and rebellion.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Bloch family has given a lot to Kansas City, including a donation of 29 masterworks by Impressionist and Post-Impressionist artists of the late 19th century to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Today we're live from the Bloch Galleries, previewing the collection's new home inside the museum. 

Senate Democrats / Flickr - CC

From his vantage point in the U.S. Senate, Sheldon Whitehouse is of the mind that the longstanding tradition of honor in American politics is disappearing. Today, he argues corporate infiltration into the political system is to blame.

Will O'Neill / Flickr - CC

Today we ask the Ethics Professors which services the government is (and is not) morally obligated to provide its citizens. Health care? Education? A good-paying job? Then, KCUR's Sam Zeff fills us in on a Kansas Supreme Court ruling with major implications for education funding and equity.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor Mark Holland speaks with host Steve Kraske about the State of the Government Address he presented on February 28, noting the progress made in Wyandotte County, and what more needs to be done. Also, our Political Pundits examine President Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress.

Wylie "Cyote" C / Wikimedia Commons

In such a divided era in America, is respect for different faiths critical to the country's success? A former member of President Obama's Faith Advisory Council answers that question. Then, trout season begins on March 1 and there's no better place in Missouri to ring it in than Bennett Spring State Park, outside Lebanon.

401(K) 2012 / Flickr - CC

Whether or not you enjoy your career, you likely plan on permanently leaving the workforce at some point. With longer life expectancy rates, and shrinking stability in government pension programs, hopeful retirees are right to be concerned about the financial viability of doing so. Today, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts detail pragmatic planning tactics and crisis control for those currently in danger of outliving their assets.

Netflix

First, we discuss Wednesday's deadly shooting that killed one man and injured two others in an Olathe bar.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Every major advancement of African-Americans since the Civil War has been met and opposed by "white rage," says Carol Anderson. Today, she explains how resentful whites have looked to halt the progress of blacks through discriminatory policies, laws, intimidation and violence.

Nic McPhee / Flickr - CC

For parents who have a picky eater in the house, mealtime can feel like a battle. Today, we get tips from health professionals — and from listeners with front-line experience — for encouraging good routines in the kitchen and at the table. We'll also explore ways to get your kids interested and involved in preparing the food they eat.

William Shepard Walsh / Flickr - CC

For the 3rd year in a row, Abraham Lincoln topped C-SPAN's presidential leadership survey. On Presidents Day (more accurately known as Washington's Birthday), we explore the struggle over emancipation and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment.

Helene C. Stikkel / U.S. Department of Defense

As  the first woman to represent Kansas in the U.S. Senate, Nancy Kassebaum Baker is a political legend. Today she shares her thoughts on the current state of the Republican Party, locally and nationally. Also, tracing one's lineage is popular, but it remains challenging for descendants of slaves. A genealogist explains the common challenges that can arise, and offers professional advice to ease the journey.

Robert Wright / Wikimedia Commons

Has a piece of art ever left you scratching your head? Today, we find out what goes through the mind of postmodern master David Salle when he's perusing a painting or sculpture. Here's a hint: He's focused more on his feelings about the art, than about what the art is trying to accomplish.

Ken Doll / Kansas Center for Economic Growth

The Sunflower State's budget is a mess and lawmakers in Topeka are struggling to solve the state's fiscal woes. Today, a former budget director evaluates the precarious situation. Also, we speak with novelist Ellen Hopkins, who experienced the kidnapping of one daughter and the drug addiction of another.

Marco Silva / BBC World Service

How are the first few weeks of the Trump administration affecting Kansas City? On this international edition of Up To Date, host Steve Kraske is joined by the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil to hear what callers are thinking about President Trump's executive orders concerning an immigration ban and repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

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