Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

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Central Standard
2:43 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Constructing A Sustainable Toilet

Bill Jacoby watches as research assistant Nick Wilkinson takes a sample of the toilet system's water output.
Credit Jessica Salmond / University of Missouri

Professors from the University of Missouri and Duke University have been working to design self-sustaining toilets.  While this may not seem like a need in counties with developed sewer system, in places without sewer networks dealing with human waste can be a serious health problem. According to the World Health Organization, 2.4 billion people do not have access to any type of improved sanitation facility and roughly 2 million people die every year due to diarrhoeal diseases, most of them younger than 5 years old.

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Central Standard
3:43 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

A Visiting Curator's Perspective On Kansas City's Art Scene

Danny Orendorff at his first Kansas City exhibit at the gallery La Esquina. The exhibit was called We'll Make Out Better Than Okay.
Credit EG Schempf

Danny Orendorff arrived in Kansas City a year ago to serve as Curator-in-Residence for the Charlotte Street Foundation. Before he arrived in town for this rotating position, his career was split between San Francisco and Chicago.

With a year of close observation under his belt, Danny Orendorff shares his notes on Kansas City's strengths and weaknesses as an art city. He also tells us about his current exhibition at La Esquina gallery, provocatively titled The Stench of Rotting Flowers

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Central Standard
12:02 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Abuse Narratives Inform Recovery In Domestic Violence Shelters

A University of Kansas professor's recent research at a domestic violence shelter indicates that the way survivors must tell their stories in order to gain access to resources could be working against the emotional recovery process.

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Central Standard
4:49 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Movie Critics: May 2014

On Friday's Central Standard, Friday host Russ Simmons and the film critics examine the diversity of films that have arrived in the cinema this May. Plus they investigate the changing designed and amenities of theaters discussing if having food and alcohol served actually enhance the movie experience.

Opens May 2:

  • The Amazing Spider-man 2 (PG-13) - 2.5 out of 5

Opens May 9:

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Central Standard
5:14 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Three Decades Of Poverty Law In Kansas City: Highlights From Julie Levin's Career

Credit Courtesy of Julie Levin.

Julie Levin has worked with Legal Aid of Western Missouri since 1977.

In that time, she's had some monumental cases, from a suit against the Kansas City Housing Authority in 1989 that changed the face of public housing, to a case on behalf of a client who lost her job while on maternity leave. That last case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Crime Writer Joel Goldman Turns Kansas City Into A Character

Credit Courtesy of Joel Goldman

Joel Goldman was a trial lawyer in Kansas City when he came down with a medical condition that meant he couldn’t practice law. So he took all that knowledge of the law, plus some intriguing true crime stories, and turned them into fiction.

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Central Standard
6:00 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Could Cannabis Return As Cash Crop?

Cannabis has two varieties. Hemp is the variety with less than 3% THC content and is used agricultural production in Canada.
Credit Edward the Bonobo / Flickr/CC

In 1942 the U.S. Department of Agriculture produced a film promoting the many uses of hemp and touted its production as part of a patriotic mission to win the war effort. But, shortly after World War II domestic production of any form of cannabis, hemp or otherwise, became prohibited. But, the legacy of this once cash crop lingers and you don't need to look far off the roads of Kansas and Missouri to find wild varieties of "ditch weed" growing.

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Central Standard
5:41 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Cash Money Crew: Paying for College

College graduates this year will be, on average, the most indebted ever.
Credit Christpoher Lucka / Flickr/CC

Graduating seniors of 2014 will, on average, be the most indebted graduating class ever. This debt carries with it real consequences. For the first time having a college education makes someone less likely to have a home mortgage by age 30.

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Central Standard
12:01 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Michael Sam And The State Of Gay Acceptance In The Midwest

Ten years ago, the people of Missouri overwhelmingly voted to change the state constitution to define marriage as a union between a man and a woman. Last week, when openly gay football player Michael Sam was drafted by the St. Louis Rams, in Missouri, the outcry condemning Sam's lifestyle stood in stark contrast to an overwhelming outpouring of support.

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Central Standard
2:45 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Glenn North: Fostering Raw Self-Expression At 18th And Vine

Poet Glenn North has held court at the American Jazz Museum's Blue Room for the past decade.
Credit Terance Williams / Facebook

When Glenn North read a poem at the grand opening for the American Jazz Museum in 1997, something clicked.

From that moment on, the poet and the museum grew in tandem.  In 2004, North officially joined the museum's staff, establishing a nationally recognized spoken word scene at the museum's Blue Room.

North recently left his post as education manager and poet-in-residence. He plans to finish his master's degree and focus on his poetry.

Upon his departure, Central Standard invited him to sit down for a talk. Among the highlights:

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Central Standard
12:25 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Does Our City Bring Strangers Together, Or Keep Them Apart?

This crowd on Kansas City's westside probably assembled lots of strangers; where else does that happen, and how often?
Credit Jean / Flickr, Creative Commons

A recent article in the New York Times compiled a growing body of evidence suggesting that the more frequent our interactions with strangers, the happier we tend to be. The findings apply to introverts and extroverts alike. In response to the enthusiasm around that article, Central Standard asked whether the people of Kansas City encounter strangers often enough in their day-to-day lives. Does Kansas City's built environment facilitate or prohibit these kinds of interactions?

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

The Changing Role Of Natural History Museums

Ron Harvey, a conservator with Tuckerbrook Conservation LLC, uses a goat hair brush to tease decades-old dust from the hair of a bison specimen at the Natural History Museum on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, Kan.
Credit Julie Denesha / KCPT

The Natural History Museum at the University of Kansas is restoring its iconic Panorama of North American Plants and Animals, a 360-degree display of wildlife from North America. The Panorama was originally created in 1893 by KU professor Lewis Lindsay Dyche for the Kansas Pavilion of the World's Columbian Exhibition of the World's Fair in Chicago.

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Central Standard
10:05 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Unearthed Treasure: The Ethics And Aesthetics Of Displaying Tomb Relics

Two museum exhibitions currently in Kansas City are using tomb relics to bring ancient times and faraway places to life.  These artifacts have survived journeys of thousands of miles and thousands of years.

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Central Standard
3:36 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Kansas Pride: Loving A Big State With A Big Reputation

Kansas: It can sometimes be quite pretty in its own subtle way.
Credit Anita Wood / Flickr, Creative Commons

Kansans sometimes get picked on. They've heard every joke in the book about Toto and Dorothy, and they're not amused.

On Central Standard, we met with two people whose love for the state is both unconventional and all-consuming. They discuss the many rewards that await those willing to explore a state so often dismissed as empty and flat, suggesting ideas for enjoyable daytrips (see below).  They also offer suggestions for how Kansas can overcome some of its less flattering stereotypes. 

Guests:

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Eddie Rickenbacker: WWI Ace

A century ago, America got hooked on speed. On the ground, speed meant motor cars and in the air, it meant planes. All that speed was delivered by the internal combustion engine, and no one represented the new world of motor speed better than Eddie Rickenbacker. He was not only a champion race-car driver, but also the greatest of World War I flying aces.

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Central Standard
1:12 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Mother's Day: A Radical History, Plus Kansas Citians' Stories

Flowers are a nice gesture on Mother's Day, but there's more to this holiday than meets the eye.
Credit julie / Flickr, Creative Commons

You could be forgiven if you happen to believe that Mother's Day is a holiday invented by florists, candy stores and greeting card companies. In point of fact, however, this holiday has a hard-won, grassroots history that puts today's celebrations in context.

On Central Standard, a historian introduced us to three women who lobbied for a mother's day of sorts: the first out of a desire for peace, the second to decrease infant mortality through education, and the third in service of her own professional yearnings.

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Central Standard
2:15 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Share Economies On The Rise

Share economies are trending in the Kansas City marketplace. These are networks that give people access to goods and services without ownership. Airbnb, for example, is a service in which travelers can rent a living space from a complete stranger for a short time.

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Central Standard
12:38 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Diversity Among Teachers In Kansas City

Our nation's classrooms are gaining diversity; is there a need for teachers to reflect that reality?
Credit US Department of Education / Flickr, Creative Commons

Recent studies from the Center for American Progress and the National Education Association point to what some are calling a diversity gap in American schools. While student populations are growing more and more racially diverse, the teaching pool isn't changing at a pace that reflects that reality.

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Central Standard
12:14 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Banned And Challenged Children's Books

Credit Creative Commons

Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants series recently received the dubious distinction of topping the American Library Association's list of most-challenged books of 2013. With the author on his way to Kansas City, Central Standard took a look at what makes some of the most-challenged books so controversial.

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Graduation Anxiety

Credit Dave Herholz / Flickr/CC

    

Spring is the season of change. Many high school seniors are preparing to leave the familiar to experience the independence that comes with university life. College seniors are expected to go out into the "real world" and take on new responsibilities. On today's Central Standard, psychologist Bruce Liese guides both students and parents through the uncertainties of this transitional period.

Guest:

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Central Standard
4:02 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Library Offers Seeds To Check Out And Return

If you check out tomato seeds from the Kansas City Public Library, you'll have to pull new seeds out from the tomatoes you harvest and return them at the end of the season.
Credit Flickr user Sue Craske

There’s a new resource in town for Kansas City gardeners: a seed library. Starting this spring at the Ruiz branch of the Kansas City Public Library, anyone with a library card can check out seeds for typical garden plants, from cilantro to tomatoes. At the end of the season, patrons return the seeds they harvest from the plants they grow.

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Central Standard
10:50 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Americana Songstress Holly Golightly, En Route To Kansas City

On her way to Kansas City to play a springtime gig, retro rocker Holly Golightly chatted with Gina Kaufmann about her danceable songs inspired by pre-rock Americana. We listened to a few good songs and heard why Holly likens her distinctive sound to a "bourbon-soaked front porch."

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

The Shrinking Population In Kansas

Kansas is in the midst of a net population decline, most of this population loss comes from rural counties.
Credit bkern1989 / Flickr -- Creative Commons

While the population of the United States continues to grow, new census reports show that more people are moving out of Kansas than are moving in. According to the census reports, Kansas lost more than 10,000 people between 2010 and 2013. This population decrease is most acute in the rural counties of Kansas. 

On Wednesday's Central Standard we explore why Kansas is shrinking, what impact this will have on the state and what actions are being taken to reverse the trend.

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Central Standard
4:00 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

National Geographic Photographer Captures Hidden Worlds

Japanese geisha
Credit Jodi Cobb

National Geographic photographer Jodi Cobb travels great distances to discover the secret realms of world culture. She has documented fascinating visual stories about many subjects, including the quirky nature of twins, the hidden lives of Saudi Arabian women and Japanese geishas.

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Central Standard
12:40 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Kansas City Actor Emerges On A Bigger Stage

Darrow plays Kevin Spacey's bodyguard and driver in the Netflix original series.
Credit Matteo Bittanti / Flickr / Creative Commons

Nathan Darrow, an actor from Overland Park, Kan., has rocketed to stardom in his role as Edward Meechum on the Netflix show House of Cards. Darrow got his big break when he completed a world tour with a Sam Mendes production of Richard III, also starring Kevin Spacey. (A one-time screening of a documentary about that world tour will take place at the Tivoli April 29 at 7:30 p.m.

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Central Standard
9:28 am
Tue April 29, 2014

The Role Of Food During World War I

Foreign Legion, 4th Liberty Loan Drive, New Orleans, La. Oct. 2, 1918
Credit The U.S. National Archives / Flickr / Creative Commons

On today's Central Standard, culinary historian Andrea Broomfield joins us to discuss the importance of food during the first World War.

Broomfield explains what the food industry was like during that time at War Fare: Chow Challenge on April 30. Chefs from area restaurants will compete in an Iron Chef-style event using food available during World War I. 

 Guest:

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Central Standard
9:51 am
Mon April 28, 2014

How Does Yelp Affect Restaurants?

A place setting at The Rieger.
Credit The DLC / Flickr / Creative Commons

Online restaurant reviews on sites like Yelp and Urban Spoon have become an integral part of the restaurant industry today. Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann explores the credibility of these user reviews. Do they change the way chefs and restaurant staff manage their business? 

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Central Standard
2:33 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Drinking And Driving: Culture, Infrastructure And The Law

Kansas City weighs in on getting home safely after nights out and about, possibly spent drinking.
Credit Arriva436 / Creative Commons

In recent years, we've heard a lot more about texting and driving than we have about drinking and driving. But drunk driving is still prevalent. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, alcohol-impaired car crashes account for nearly one-third of all traffic-related deaths in the United States. 

As spring revelry leads to late nights out, Central Standard asks whether Kansas Citians are making plans to get home safely, and if not, why not?

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Central Standard
3:23 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Shopping Mall Closures And What They Mean For Our Cityscape

Bannister Mall, pictured here, was legendary in the rise and fall of the local shopping mall.
Credit Mike Calasnic / Creative Commons, Flickr

Shopping malls across the city and across the nation are closing their doors or re-imagining their futures. With the recent closure of Metro North and a meeting called to gather community input on redevelopment possibilities for Metcalf South, Central Standard convened local experts to look back on the significance of the shopping mall, in our city and in our lives. 

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Central Standard
12:18 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

The Psychology Of Hatred And What Defines A Hate Crime

Experts agree that hate is a bitter potion (Adriaen Brouwer, The Bitter Potion at the Stadel, Frankfurt).
Credit Creative Commons

In the aftermath of the shootings at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom on April 13, a suspect has been charged with murder and hate crime charges will likely be filed against him.

As that question looms, Central Standard inquires into the nature of the word hate — its psychological underpinnings, as well as the definition of hate crime in our legal code. 

Guests:

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