Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways to Connect

Potter's Field

Jun 30, 2016
Anna Sturla / KCUR 89.3

Leeds Cemetery, which is out by I-435, near the stadiums, is a potter's field. Underneath the empty, grassy field are the bodies of people whose families were too poor to pay for funerals.

We explore what happens to unclaimed bodies in Kansas City.

Guests:

  • Gloria Lundy, local resident whose grandfather is buried at Leeds
  • Bridget Anaya, manager, Charter Funerals

 

 

Beth Scupham/Flickr -- CC

Inspired by a new exhibit at Union Station, which features preserved corpses, we explore our relationship with our bodies.

Guests:

The KCMO City Council is debating a $27 million improvement package for the historic Jazz District at 18th and Vine. We look at the ongoing effort to revitalize and enhance the area — and hear why it has special meaning for some Kansas Citians.

Tonight's town hall meeting about the future of 18th and Vine starts at 6 p.m. at Centennial United Methodist Church.

Guests:

A look at Brexit and its impact across the globe, including here in KC. What's the professional and personal impact on people in the Midwest, and how will it affect our future?

Guests:

  • Raj Bhala, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, Rice Distinguished Professor, KU School of Law
  • Bart Dean, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology at KU
  • Kim Noble, former KCUR announcer
Faith Bemiss / The Sedalia Democrat

In Sedalia, Missouri, Marge Harlan spent $25,000 of her own money to build a "slave cabin." While she meant the cabin to honor the courage and resilience of African-Americans, many in the community, especially people of color, have found the gesture problematic and offensive.

We ask, how do we commemorate history? What is the best way to remember a conflicted and painful past? And who gets to decide?

Guests:

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: A KU professor, who studies how lizards branch into various species, has come to some pretty big conclusions on what defines a species.

Guest:

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: On the face of it, the 1983 Royals-Yankees insanity known as the Pine Tar Game is all about a technicality and a tantrum. But scratch beneath the surface and it's a Shakespearean-caliber drama with complex characters and a generations-long feud.

Guest:

At one point, the Lawrence Journal-World was known for its innovative cable and web ventures, long before other newspapers. But after 125 years, the Simons family is selling the paper to a company that's based in West Virginia.

We explore the impact that this particular family business has had in Lawrence ... as well as what it means for coverage of local and state issues.

Guest:

Retake

Jun 22, 2016

We hear the story behind two men who discovered their KC connection on a movie set in Los Angeles. Their film, Retake, will make its local debut tomorrow night at the Kansas City LGBT Film Festival.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Five days after the mass shooting that killed 49 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Lawrence, Kansas based musician Kristie Stremel released a new song.

After a live performance in studio, we hear the story behind "Orlando (Keep Dancing)."

Guest:

 

Terrorism Surveillance

Jun 21, 2016

Attacks like the one in Orlando, or San Bernardino, or even closer to home in Overland Park, Kansas, seem random and terrifying. How can local law enforcement prevent something like that from happening again? How does surveillance both protect our safety, yet still preserve our civil liberties?

And, in the aftermath of Orlando, a representative from our local Muslim community shares how it feels to be part of a "targeted group."

Guests: 

https://www.facebook.com/RootsSeries/

In 1977, Roots became one of the most-watched TV miniseries of all time. Based on Alex Haley's book about his family's story, from enslavement to liberation, it won a multitude of awards and exposed Americans to the horrors of slavery.

The recent remake of Roots enters into a more complex and nuanced culture of racial representation. We explore the new version, its place in American culture ... and if we needed a remake of such an iconic series.

Guests:

Inspired by a Harvest Public Media series on safety in the meatpacking industry, we explore how you reform an industry.

Guests:

Ruth Hartnup/Flickr -- CC

Racism can be difficult to confront, particularly if it appears in a classic children’s book. We explore how diversity was represented in children's literature of the past, and how it's being redefined in the future.

Guests:

Last year, we asked our listeners to solve the Kansas School Funding Formula. As news develops around a potential public education shutdown in Kansas, we break out our calculators and enter the Kansas school funding debate. When legislators go back to Topeka next week, what will go into solving the state's toughest math problem?

A update on a proposed retail and residential development in Overland Park that would rival the size of the Plaza.

Guest:

Rick Hellman, freelance journalist

Courtesy of Joshua Hoffine

Joshua Hoffine is a local photographer. He doesn't take your typical wedding or graduation portraits, though — his specialty is "horror photography," and he features his daughters in his photo shoots.

Guest:

  We explore the issues related to infertility: Why is there a stigma attached to it, and how some women — and men — are creating communities where they're safe to open up.

Guests:

 

Michael Bentley / Flickr

A quiet debate is raging over liquor licensing laws in the Crossroads District. Does it matter, to the character of a neighborhood, what time bars and restaurants issue that famous last call? If you don't have to go home but you can't stay here, what are your options, and who's making those choices?

Guests:

When a child fell into the gorilla habitat of the Cincinnati Zoo last week, the event ended in the death of the gorilla. What are the ethics at the intersection of human and animal life?

Plus, the story of a KC resident who, as a toddler, escaped from his mom and entered the seal exhibit at the St. Louis Zoo.

Guests:

Members of KC's transgender community are finding their voice ... literally, their singing voice. We explore how transitioning isn't all about looks — it's also about sound.'

The Heartland Trans Chorus will perform for the first time this Sunday, June 5 at Kansas City Pride Fest.

Guests:

Is autism a culture, a disability ... or maybe both? We explore the community around autism, and if that “disability” is truly disabling.

Guests:

 

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

When you picture a break-dancer, or "b-boy," you may envision a skinny kid who drops to the ground and pops back up like it's no big deal, like gravity has no say in the matter. But the hip-hop culture that gave rise to break-dancing isn't getting any younger. Now that the original hip-hop generation is bringing kids to the club for events featuring crayons, how is the culture growing up with them? Bonus: profiles of three icons in Kansas City's hip-hop scene.

Guests:

Miguel Calderon / courtesy University Daily Kansan

In July 2017, a Kansas law that permits concealed carry in state hospitals and universities takes effect. We explore the idea of safety in places of healing and learning.

Guests:

  • Reinheld Janzen, Professor Emerita of Art History at Washburn University
  • Miguel Calderon, recent KU graduate

A new Missouri law (SB 919) has been a source of contention among craft brewers and beer lovers in the state. Craft brewers feel that it will give a big boost to companies like Anheuser-Busch in convenience stores by letting them lease out refrigerator space. Lawmakers say that stores could stock craft brews in those cases.

It's a question you hear a lot, especially if you have young children and live on the Missouri side of the state line: Where are you sending your kids to school?

We explore the world of charter schools — they're getting so big in KC that even the district is opening one. Who chooses charter schools and why? Are charters bringing on a new era of thriving public education in KC or taking away from struggling district schools? Are they integrating urban neighborhoods or segregating communities in new way?

Guests:

Wikipedia

Once upon a time, a paleontology expedition to dig up dinosaur bones might have been funded primarily by grants and major philanthropists. But KU's Natural History Museum has its eye on a tyrannosaurus rex, and if they succeed in bringing the specimen home from Montana this summer, guess who's footing the bill? You are, through crowd-sourcing. How the crowd-funding model is changing education, from grade school classrooms to university museums.

Guests:

A new book about Wichita artists has us intrigued. What's the art scene like in the biggest city in Kansas?

Guests:

  • Larry Schwarm, photographer
  • Elizabeth Stevenson, artist

He's been a gravedigger, a roadie, a truck unloader and more; now, he runs two popular Lawrence restaurants. We hear the stories behind Matt Hyde's eclectic resume ... and why he sometimes breaks plates on purpose.

Guest:

Many people dismiss Kansas as flyover country: squares and rectangles in a vast farmland quilt. A Lawrence author begs to differ; he spent years exploring the undiscovered wilderness in the state. He shares the last wild spots that still exist around Kansas ... and in the KC suburbs.

Guest:

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