Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways To Connect

Next week, KU will host a Black Arts Poetry Conference, which will feature readings by poets Frank X. Walker and Kevin Young at the Black Archives of Mid-America. A poet and one of the conference organizers discuss the past, present and future of African American poetry.

Most Kansas Citians have heard of Claycomo — officially called The Village of Claycomo — but how much do we really know about it? The mayor of Claycomo tells us more about his village — and dispels some myths.

What is life like for LGBTQ folks in rural Kansas and Missouri? A Kansas City actor/writer and residents from Kearney, Missouri and Hiawatha and Hays, Kansas share their perspectives.

All Aboard

Jul 14, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

It was smelly, crowded and potentially life-threatening, but riding on a steamboat was de rigeur for travelers to Kansas City in the mid-nineteenth century. For a brief and some might say "golden" era, the steamboat was also the primary agent of settlement and change. How steamboats shaped Kansas City.

Guests:

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Heidi Van says that Kansas City needs to send original, locally created theater out into the world every bit as much as it needs a baseball team. That means experimenting on stage, taking risks, re-tooling scenes and sometimes failing. In front of an audience. Get a window into the world of experimental theater in Kansas City. 

Guests:

When it comes to refreshing summer drinks, sour isn't a characteristic that usually comes to mind. We invite two local brewers to guide us through the sour beer trend, and our in-house expert samples their wares (for research purposes, of course).

Missouri Valley Special Collections/Kansas City Public Library

Hear the stories of historic Midtown Kansas City, from the heart of Westport to Manheim Park.

Guest:

  • Mary Jo Draper, author, Kansas City's Historic Midtown Neighborhoods

Ford's auto assembly plant in Claycomo employs 6000 auto workers. In a town of only 1500. We explore the relationship between Claycomo the factory and Claycomo the place.

Guests:

  • Dan Verbeck, former KCUR reporter, Northland resident
  • Lonnie Bush, auto worker, Ford
Celeste Lindell/Flickr -- CC

It's a well-known cycle: Artists move into neglected neighborhoods, use their creativity to transform the area, then get priced out. In a recently published article in Lumpen Magazine, two local thinkers wonder, do artists make these places? Or do they just move in? We invite one of those authors and another arts developer in town to discuss.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

As the National Council of La Raza prepares to convene its annual conference in Kansas City, a lively and heartfelt conversation about the term 'la raza' -- translated imperfectly as 'the race', but meaning something closer to 'my tribe', 'the big family' or 'my people'. 

Fear Factor

Jul 6, 2015
Pixabay

Kids are riding bikes less and less. Some of that has to do with parents' fears, and some of it has to do with a shift in community design (after all, you can only get so far in a cul-de-sac). Parents swap stories, strategies and concerns about getting the elementary-school set back in gear.

Guests:

Of The People

Jul 2, 2015
Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection

What is folk art? It's a seemingly simple question, but answers may vary. And when you put folk art in a museum... is it still folksy? Stories, insights and observations.

Suzanne Hogan, KCUR

The Missouri River plays an important part in Kansas City's history. But for many people today, it's an obstacle that divides our city. We look into how to cross the river if you don't have a car, and discuss what "The Northland" means.

Goal

Jun 30, 2015

The US Women's Soccer team is headed to the semi-finals of the World Cup in a high-stakes match against Germany. Four of the team members are from Kansas City. Should we be hearing more about that?

Guests:

  • Yael Averbush, midfielder, FCKC
  • Greg Echlin, sports reporter, KCUR
  • Chandrima Chaterjee, editor, Women United FC
Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

If music comes as much from an instrument as from a musician, the people who build and repair instruments are invisible collaborators. The poetics of piano-tuning, the heroics of a horn-doctor and the serenade of a violin-maker.

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR

And what hasn't? Kansas City couples tell us how the Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage has -- and hasn't -- changed things for them. 

Guests:

  • Donna and Dorothy Loyd
  • Angela Kelly

Bill Martin studied with revered lamas in India. He was also the charismatic founder of a money-making church, and ultimately, a sufferer from mental illness who died in a hospital for the homeless. Years later, his son tries to understand the man who raised him.

Guest:

Kansas City is known as a nice town that's filled with nice people. Nice, right? Or is it? We invite an etiquette expert, a KC native and a sociology professor to discuss the history and purpose of etiquette — and what the phrase "Kansas City nice" really means.

Guests:

  • Janis Kliethermes, owner, Etiquette Kansas City
  • Rashaan Gilmore, citizen, Kansas City
  • Michelle Smirnova, assistant professor of sociology, UMKC

Podcasts are becoming more mainstream all across the country, covering topics from baseball to Macintosh product training, to mystery solving. We explored podcasts with the help of local producer and co-host, Beckett Graham — her podcast is called the History Chicks, which dedicates each episode to one woman in history — and KCUR's own Jeremy Bernfeld, editor of Harvest Public Media, and an informal podcast enthusiast and critic.

We talk to the senior pastor of Kansas City's Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church about last week's shooting and murder of nine people at an AME church in Charleston, South Carolina. We also discuss the formation of racial identity in this country with a history professor, a vice-chancellor of diversity and inclusion (who is also a psychologist) and a high school teacher.

Wikimedia Commons

The car is a mechanical work of art. There are people who obsessively design, build and restore cars... and others crash them with just as much passion. From the Art of the Car Concours to the  demolition derby.

Guests:

  • Tony Jones, interim president, The Kansas City Art Institute
  • Mac McLanahan, artist and demolition derby driver

Lobbyists get a bad rap, but before we judge, let's hear from the lobbyists themselves about what they do and how they get it done. Everything you've always wanted to know but were too afraid to ask. Plus, notes on the recent legislative session in Kansas.

Guests:

  • Kimberly Svatie, lobbyist, Gencur Svatie Public Affairs
  • Bill Sneed, lawyer and lobbyist, Polsinelli

Seventeen

Jun 22, 2015

That's how many years it's been since the last time this summer's brood of cicadas came out of the ground. Why do they spend so long underground? What do they do down there? And should you consider eating them? Bonus sounds: Will Smith's Gettin' Jiggy Wit It and live cicadas in-studio.

Guest:

  • Mary McCoy, entomologist and professor emeritus in Washburn University's biology department

Pod People

Jun 22, 2015

On the newest edition of Audiofiles, an irreverent women's history podcaster tells her story and sings a drinking song. A prolific podcast-listener shares a playlist. Obama's visit to Marc Maron's garage is discussed.

Guests:

  • Beckett Graham, cocreator of The History Chicks podcast
  • Jeremy Bernfeld, editor, Harvest Public Media

Do you clean your plate? Should you keep a chicken that's been in your freezer for 10 years? We visit farms, a meat processing plant, a compost heap, grocery stores and Kansas Citians' kitchens to explore the issue of food waste.

When you smell fresh-mowed grass, you’re actually smelling botanical terror. Two MU professors fill us in on the intriguing ways plants communicate.

Guests:

  • Jack C. Schultz, director, Christopher S. Bond Life Science Center, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Heidi Appel, senior research scientist, Christopher S. Bond Life Science Center, University of Missouri-Columbia

Kansas Citians often overlook destinations north of the Missouri River when thinking about where to dine. Hear Northland restaurant recommendations from our listeners and food critic Charles Ferruzza. 

Guests:

  • Charles Ferruzza, The Pitch
  • Alyson Raletz, social media editor, KCUR
Ian Monroe / Flickr

Leaving Kansas City and moving back again are popular pastimes. But each decision is difficult and personal. Stories, data, weather-analysis and a reminder that jerks live everywhere.

Epic Summer

Jun 16, 2015

If summertime means being out of school, think again. Crestview Elementary is one of two schools in the metro experimenting with a year-long schedule. So we attempt to redefine summer, with great literature set amid sweltering summer heat and a roadtrip in search of a frozen dessert called "pineapple whip."

Guests:

Alyson Raletz, KCUR

Kansas City is a dress-casual town, for the most part — it's not uncommon to see people (especially guys) wearing baseball caps or Big 12 gear while out and about. However, there are signs that the men's fashion scene is branching out. We invite two local suit connoisseurs and a bow-tie entrepreneur to talk about style and what fashion means to them.

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