Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways To Connect

Kansas City is known as a nice town that's filled with nice people. Nice, right? Or is it? We invite an etiquette expert, a KC native and a sociology professor to discuss the history and purpose of etiquette — and what the phrase "Kansas City nice" really means.

Guests:

  • Janis Kliethermes, owner, Etiquette Kansas City
  • Rashaan Gilmore, citizen, Kansas City
  • Michelle Smirnova, assistant professor of sociology, UMKC

Podcasts are becoming more mainstream all across the country, covering topics from baseball to Macintosh product training, to mystery solving. We explored podcasts with the help of local producer and co-host, Beckett Graham — her podcast is called the History Chicks, which dedicates each episode to one woman in history — and KCUR's own Jeremy Bernfeld, editor of Harvest Public Media, and an informal podcast enthusiast and critic.

We talk to the senior pastor of Kansas City's Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church about last week's shooting and murder of nine people at an AME church in Charleston, South Carolina. We also discuss the formation of racial identity in this country with a history professor, a vice-chancellor of diversity and inclusion (who is also a psychologist) and a high school teacher.

Wikimedia Commons

The car is a mechanical work of art. There are people who obsessively design, build and restore cars... and others crash them with just as much passion. From the Art of the Car Concours to the  demolition derby.

Guests:

  • Tony Jones, interim president, The Kansas City Art Institute
  • Mac McLanahan, artist and demolition derby driver

Lobbyists get a bad rap, but before we judge, let's hear from the lobbyists themselves about what they do and how they get it done. Everything you've always wanted to know but were too afraid to ask. Plus, notes on the recent legislative session in Kansas.

Guests:

  • Kimberly Svatie, lobbyist, Gencur Svatie Public Affairs
  • Bill Sneed, lawyer and lobbyist, Polsinelli

Seventeen

Jun 22, 2015

That's how many years it's been since the last time this summer's brood of cicadas came out of the ground. Why do they spend so long underground? What do they do down there? And should you consider eating them? Bonus sounds: Will Smith's Gettin' Jiggy Wit It and live cicadas in-studio.

Guest:

  • Mary McCoy, entomologist and professor emeritus in Washburn University's biology department

Pod People

Jun 22, 2015

On the newest edition of Audiofiles, an irreverent women's history podcaster tells her story and sings a drinking song. A prolific podcast-listener shares a playlist. Obama's visit to Marc Maron's garage is discussed.

Guests:

  • Beckett Graham, cocreator of The History Chicks podcast
  • Jeremy Bernfeld, editor, Harvest Public Media

Do you clean your plate? Should you keep a chicken that's been in your freezer for 10 years? We visit farms, a meat processing plant, a compost heap, grocery stores and Kansas Citians' kitchens to explore the issue of food waste.

When you smell fresh-mowed grass, you’re actually smelling botanical terror. Two MU professors fill us in on the intriguing ways plants communicate.

Guests:

  • Jack C. Schultz, director, Christopher S. Bond Life Science Center, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Heidi Appel, senior research scientist, Christopher S. Bond Life Science Center, University of Missouri-Columbia

Kansas Citians often overlook destinations north of the Missouri River when thinking about where to dine. Hear Northland restaurant recommendations from our listeners and food critic Charles Ferruzza. 

Guests:

  • Charles Ferruzza, The Pitch
  • Alyson Raletz, social media editor, KCUR
Ian Monroe / Flickr

Leaving Kansas City and moving back again are popular pastimes. But each decision is difficult and personal. Stories, data, weather-analysis and a reminder that jerks live everywhere.

Epic Summer

Jun 16, 2015

If summertime means being out of school, think again. Crestview Elementary is one of two schools in the metro experimenting with a year-long schedule. So we attempt to redefine summer, with great literature set amid sweltering summer heat and a roadtrip in search of a frozen dessert called "pineapple whip."

Guests:

Alyson Raletz, KCUR

Kansas City is a dress-casual town, for the most part — it's not uncommon to see people (especially guys) wearing baseball caps or Big 12 gear while out and about. However, there are signs that the men's fashion scene is branching out. We invite two local suit connoisseurs and a bow-tie entrepreneur to talk about style and what fashion means to them.

Kansas City was founded as a Missouri River port, but we've come a long way from our waterway roots. Take Turkey Creek — it flows through Kansas City, Kansas by Southwest Boulevard (and makes for a scenic stop at Merriam's Waterfall Park), but few people know it's there. We talk to three local residents who use art to take a new look at our waterways.

A 13-year-old from Olathe won the title of co-champion of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. The omnivorous speller banters with other local word-enthusiasts, and correctly spells cruciverbalist

Guests:

An update on plans to repurpose about 30 vacated schools in Kansas City. Plus, the challenges, joys, and enduring impact of finding new uses for buildings that have outlived their intended functions. The transformation of gas stations, old theaters, churches and post offices.

Did Dr. Bennett Hyde kill his patient, Thomas Swope, of Swope Park fame? A true-life, historical, creepy and disgusting Kansas City murder mystery, courtesy of our historian, Monroe Dodd.

Boston Public Library/Flickr -- CC

Recently, the superintendents of the Kansas City Public Schools and the Blue Valley School District announced that they're leaving their posts. What does that mean to their school districts? We explore the role of the school superintendent.

East Of Westport

Jun 3, 2015

The corner of Westport Road and Main Street, presided over by a stopped clock tower, might just be undergoing a bit of a renaissance. We invite a business owner and a resident artist to discuss the changes at this iconic intersection.

Two retired MLB players--Rex Hudler of Fox Sports (now a Royals announcer) and Fred Kipp of the Dodgers and the Yankees--share their experiences on and off the field, then and now. 

Kansas City's Rosies

Jun 1, 2015

70 years later, we catch up with Kansas City's own Riveter Rosies--the women behind the manufacturing of the aircrafts taken to battle in WWII. 

During World War II, the noses and tails of airplanes often were painted with cartoon characters, topless women or even some geographical landmarks. A history professor explains the meaning and stories behind those iconic designs.

LIbrary of Congress/Google Images -- CC

During World War II, the Hollywood Canteen in Los Angeles was a famous nightclub where civilian hostesses danced with Allied soldiers of all races. It was an oasis during a time of segregation — or was it? KU professor Sherrie Tucker interviewed people who frequented the club and heard about their different — and sometimes contradictory — experiences on the dance floor.

Guest:

Monumenteer2014/Google Images -- CC

Multiple choice time. Was high school:

(a) The time of your life (kind of like Bruce Springsteen's "Glory Days")

(b) A soul-scarring period of angst (as depicted in any John Hughes movie)

(c) None of the above

We catch up with our Class of 2015 students. We also talk to a local podcast host about why he was ready to put high school behind him and a Kansas City Public Schools staffer about what comes after graduation for the most vulnerable kids.

Guests:

Judith G. Levy

Every family has its secrets and stories. Artist Judith G. Levy tells her family's stories — focusing on disconnects — through photographs and captions as part of a new exhibit at La Esquina. 

A Missouri inmate recently refused to participate in Alcoholics Anonymous; he explained that the faith-based recovery program goes against his beliefs as an atheist. Where do people who aren't religious turn for recovery?

Guests:

Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious / Flickr

Central Standard's annual check-in on Kansas City's attempts to become a bicycle-friendly town. News, obstacles, progress reports and more. Plus, voices and stories from Missouri's Katy Trail.

horslips5/Flickr -- CC

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill recently tweeted that she's done with Game of Thrones. Are you? We invite a critic, a medieval scholar and a political scientist to review the controversial show.

Guests: 

  • Loey Lockerby, media critic
  • Misty Schieberle, associate professor of English, University of Kansas
  • Jack Reilly, assistant professor of Political Science, New College of Florida
Americasroof/Google Images -- CC

How is the Kansas City Star adapting to the changing media environment? Editor Mike Fannin discusses the challenges of reaching readers, the redesign of the digital and print editions and the future of the newsroom.

A New York writer's journey home sheds light on family, keeping secrets, and the state of small-town Missouri. Plus, how one Missouri town might vote itself out of existence.

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