Matthew Long-Middleton

Central Standard Producer

Matthew has been involved in media since 2003. While hosting a show on his college radio station, he quickly realized the influence, intimacy and joys of radio. Rising up through the ranks, he became co-station manager of WKCO in 2006.

Matthew soon after graduated cum laude from Kenyon College. After a brief stint as a short-order cook in exotic Gambier, Ohio he joined Murray Street Productions as the marketing manager. At Murray Street he also conducted interviews, produced podcasts, wrote scripts for Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio, and made the office computers hum.

In addition to working at Murray Street, Matthew has done freelance radio production and his work has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s local news program Eight Forty-Eight. He has also worked as a marketing assistant at WBGO in Newark, NJ, where he helped to grow audience through placing advertisements, managing the station social media, improving the website, building email campaigns and doing in person promotion at jazz events throughout New York and New Jersey.

Matthew now enjoys the thrills of producing KCUR's daily talk show Central Standard. When he's not producing you can typically find him biking, reading, cooking or exploring Kansas City.

Ways To Connect

With Kansas City's transgender community reeling from news of the violent death of Tamara Dominguez, a 36-year-old woman who was both transgender and latina, concerns about safety for transgender people of color have risen to the surface.

UPDATE: As the show neared its conclusion, a story appeared in The Guardian suggesting another transgender homicide victim in Kansas City this year.

Charlie Parker's birthday is coming up, and Kansas City is all a-twitter. Hear a visiting jazz scholar's take on the history of Bebop, and Kansas City-born Charlie Parker's place in it. Bonus: a recording of a jam session where you can hear the Bird talking.

Guest:

Two sisters, both Blues singers, talk about being creative siblings, and what drives them to make music.

Guests:

  • Samantha Fish, musician, new album: Wild Heart
  • Amanda Fish, musician, new album: Down in the Dirt
Courtesy of Jim Wilson

This weekend, the Ethnic Enrichment Festival sets up shop in Swope Park. How do we think about ethnicity in America today? We invite a professor who focuses on ethnic and cultural studies, the co-founder of the Latino Writer's Collective and a local resident who runs the Indonesia booth to share their thoughts.

With the recent passing of Jesse Hope, the founder and curator of the Old Quindaro Museum and one of the historic township's most dedicated champions, questions arise about the future of the site and its legacy. 

Guest:

  • Laura Ziegler, community engagement reporter, KCUR

Humans and squirrels live side by side in urban and suburban neighborhoods. When humans observe and document these smaller animals in their yards and on their blocks, that isn't just a weird hobby; it informs science. 

Guest:

Recent calls for police body cameras raise questions about documenting truth. An art curator, a war historian and a police major discuss. 

Guests:

Where do you go to interact with your neighbors? Whether it's a soccer field, outdoor movie screening or a gathering of food trucks in a public park — or even a created space that a local artist filled with hammocks — we explore what makes for a good gathering spot.

Our resident historian and an attorney/engineer who is involved in KC's levee systems management discuss how floods have shaped and changed the city.

Sylvia Maria Gross/KCUR

Get into the world of KC garage sales, estate sales, yard sales and more. A local resident who runs an estate sale business and an author who has studied American garage sales share their thoughts on the thrill of the thrift.

When researchers stumbled upon a buttery substance under a lake, they thought maybe they'd also stumbled upon the answer to an age old mystery: why a pre-Columbian civilization near St. Louis abandoned the complex city they'd built. But with multiple research teams exploring the Cahokia Mounds site, not everyone agrees on what the new discovery means. 

Guests:

  • Sissel Schroeder, University of Wisconsin
  • Melissa Balthus Zych, University of Toledo
Courtesy of Gary Staab

You know those gigantic dinosaur models you see in natural history museums, frozen in mid-roar? There's a good chance they were made in Kearney, Missouri by a guy named Gary Staab. From his encounter with Lucy (the famous skeleton of our human ancestor) to a mummified human known as the Ice Man, Gary Staab takes us face to face with prehistoric life. 

Praeger publishing

The escalating problem of student debt isn't just about the pain of writing large checks. So say two University of Kansas professors who have co-written a book on the crisis, using their own personal stories to make a case that differences in access to higher ed begin long before loans, and influence life and career paths far beyond graduation.

Guests:

Photographer Lara Shipley discusses Devil's Promenade, her photo series that depicts life in the Ozarks, where she grew up.

A Kansas Citian with ties to Greece shares his perspective on the financial crisis there, and a UMKC professor who predicted trouble in the Eurozone in 1998 discusses how it all came about — and how UMKC approaches economics in a radical way.

Responding to our query about garage sales, two of our listeners explain their favorite finds.

Guests:

  • Brad Lieffring
  • Lynette Fisk

A KU professor discusses the history of Japanese desserts, and how they contain less sugar than their Western counterparts.

A food historian discusses why we prefer bold, dry wines like Cabernet and Chardonnay — and how Missouri grapes saved the French wine industry.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Research into income mobility across US counties inspires Central Standard to take a roadtrip, talk to an economist and hear from locals with their own research and experience to share. Is the "land of opportunity" created by individuals or their environments?

Guests:

Class issues can be all over the headlines, even when the word 'class' never appears. So says Kansas writer Sarah Smarsh. A quick breakdown of recent headlines through the lens of class in Kansas.

Guest:

On the face of it, the 1983 Royals-Yankees insanity known as the Pine Tar Game is all about a technicality and a tantrum. But scratch beneath the surface and it's a Shakespearean-caliber drama with complex characters and a generations-long feud.

Guest:

A KU ornithologist discusses how climate change has affected birds in Mexico and what this means for life on earth.

Should universities police student behavior on social media? Recently, a KU student was expelled for comments he made about an ex-girlfriend on Twitter. A reporter and a student discuss the case and whether social media is part of a school's learning environment.

Meet actor and Kansas City native Mark Patton. During the 1980s, he was an openly gay actor in Hollywood. After starring in Nightmare on Elm Street 2, his big-screen career took a hit because of homophobia in Hollywood. Patton is back in town for a screening for one of his movies, Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean.

For generations, fast-pitch softball united some of Kansas City's Mexican-American community. A new documentary and exhibit shines a light on local players and their histories. We invite the documentary's filmmaker and a fast-pitch softball player/coach to discuss the impact that softball has had on our community.

Wikipedia--CC

The 1974 Ozark Music Festival lives on in infamy.

It drew as many as 350,000 people to the small, family-oriented town of Sedalia.

Traffic ground to a halt. Temperatures were in the triple-digits. Nudity ran rampant and the cost of ice skyrocketed.

Residents came home to festival-goers camped out on their lawns, using garden hoses for "baths." People sent their children out of town for safety. Hungry, drug-addled music fans stole a cow. And it only gets crazier from there.

Guest:

Schoolchildren have been admiring Atticus Finch from To Kill A Mockingbird for generations. With the publication of Go Set A Watchman, readers are learning about a side of Atticus they're having a hard time stomaching. But fictional characters change all the time in their private lives with their authors.

Guest:

  • Catherine Browder, author of three collections of fiction, associate in UMKC's Creative Writing Program
Gina Kaufmann / KCUR

In 1966, the Kansas City Board of Trade Building was new. Then it got old. Now, the iconic modern structure is getting a makeover. How do you transform an iconic piece of architecture, and what's the state of modernism in the Kansas City area?

Guests:

Next week, KU will host a Black Arts Poetry Conference, which will feature readings by poets Frank X. Walker and Kevin Young at the Black Archives of Mid-America. A poet and one of the conference organizers discuss the past, present and future of African American poetry.

Most Kansas Citians have heard of Claycomo — officially called The Village of Claycomo — but how much do we really know about it? The mayor of Claycomo tells us more about his village — and dispels some myths.

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