Luke X. Martin

Associate Producer, Up To Date

Luke X. Martin is an associate producer for KCUR's Up To Date.

Born in Manhattan, Kansas, and raised in Wichita, Luke fell in love with public radio listening to KMUW. He got his start pulling early morning DJ shifts at KJHK in Lawrence while he was a student at KU.

Luke was previously an intern for Up To Date, and joined the team as a producer in 2016. His work has appeared online for UPI.com, The Daily Caller, Politics Daily and The Pitch.

He has a Master of Science degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. If you see him limping along a running trail in Kansas City or the suburbs, please offer him a drink of water or a high-five.

Ways to Connect

The University of Edinburgh

Nearly all your Web activity — from Google searches to your Amazon shopping cart — is saved, stored, and used to individualize the internet to you, or at least what an algorithm thinks is you. Today, we find out how your online footprint creates a digital profile, and where that profile goes wrong. Then, we consider whether the paradigm through which prospective reformers view problems in the education system needs to be changed.

Rene Ehrhardt / Flickr - CC

Should doctors and judges be able to decide on an infant's end-of-life care, even if it goes against the wishes of the child's parents? Does a presidential adviser owe his or her personal loyalty to their boss?

IFC Films

City planning flare-ups, folk-rock, and a poetry biopic ... if these aren't movie topics appropriate for a public radio audience, nothing is. This weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's independent, foreign and documentary film critics will give you the chance to revel in your nerdy-ness, and learn a little history in the process. We'd be lying if we claimed to be too cool for some popcorn and a well-crafted flick that features zero actual explosions.

Steve Walker

Julie Denesha / KCUR

There's a new proposal from architecture firm Burns & McDonnell that would use private money to fund construction of a new terminal to replace existing facilities at Kansas City International Airport.

Tech. Sgt. Linda Burger / Iowa National Guard

Midwesterners are used to extreme weather. We take pride in enduring everything from torrential downpours to the most desiccating drought.

Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of these fluctuations between drought and flood, though, according to new research published by scientists at the University of Kansas, and this "weather whiplash" will deteriorate the quality of drinking water.

Lynsey Addario

Your job might be challenging, but Lynsey Addario's is literally a battlefield. She's been injured, ambushed, and kidnapped while working as a photojournalist in war-torn countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. Today, we learn why the results motivate her to continue crafting stories out of conflict. Then, the life of a major league ace isn't all about 100 mile-per-hour fastballs ... or is it? We talk about the evolution of pitching with writer Terry McDermott.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Cycling 10,000 miles would be plenty of work for anyone. For Sara Dykman it's a labor of love.

The Johnson County native is pedaling her way from the mountains of Central Mexico all the way up to Southern Ontario, Canada, following the migratory pattern of millions of monarch butterflies.

"I love animals," Dykman says. "I like the underdogs — and lots of insects are ignored — but there is this one beautiful butterfly that everyone can get behind."

Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoman Collection / Doubleday

Even suave people blunder a bit here and there, but research suggests those weird traits have some advantages. Today, we look at the science behind social awkwardness. Then, we learn how vast new oil wealth among Oklahoma's Osage tribe engendered a heart-rending greed that led to a series of murders in the 1920s, and helped the fledgling FBI make a name for itself.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For many people, it is a career change, a promotion, or maybe an industry award that propels their professional life to the next level.

For Tom Toro, it was the first time he sold a cartoon to The New Yorker.

"It happened in a very modern way," says Toro. "My life changed via email."

It seems like a somewhat underwhelming email. The subject line, Toro says, read simply, 'Okay.'

Jalisco Campus Party / Flickr - CC

Are all those April showers making your May flowers feel a little soggy? Today, we get tips for late-spring gardening from the Kansas City Community Gardens. Also, we speak with Kevin Mitnick about how hackers can use digital know-how and social engineering to work their way into your computer. Mitnick gave up hacking after a five-year stint in prison for computer-related crimes. Now he helps companies and governments secure their own digital networks.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

There have been some hits and some misses during President Donald Trump's first 100 days in office. One thing everyone agrees on is there has been no shortage of surprises. Today, we hear from a distinguished panel of political observers; ABC News analyst Matthew Dowd, Time magazine editor-at-large David Von Drehle, and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial writer Colleen Nelson, of the Kansas City Star. They discuss the early days of the new executive administration.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Alexander Heffner thinks a lot about how to get millennials engaged in politics. Perhaps because he is one himself. Today, the host of PBS' The Open Mind, talks about framing old policy arguments in new ways and whether the media is fulfilling its civic duty. Then, we learn about the life of a Kansas City mermaid who — gasp! — doesn't like seafood!

Protagonist Pictures

What better way to spend a dreary weekend than taking in a few good movies at your local independent theater? If you have a hard time making up your mind, let Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics help out with their latest recommendations. They'll ensure your hair stays dry, but maybe not your eyes.

Steve Walker

Graduation, R

Transmission Films

It's not every day you can have a coherent conversation on topics ranging from "Seoul-crushing" monsters to daytime vampires and a movie about making a movie, but Up To Date's film critics manage to pull it off.

Advocate Jamie Manzer, right, shows reporter Mike Tobias a bag of essential items that a nonprofit gives trafficking victims.
David Koehn / NET News

The suburbs and shopping malls don't excite modern urban planners, but they were innovations in their own time. Today, we learn about urban designs that shape our cities. Then: Contrary to popular belief, sex trafficking is not just an urban phenomenon.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Jean Peters Baker's work doesn't end when she steps out of the Jackson County Courthouse. In fact, the county's top prosecutor recently hosted a cleanup event on the 2300 block of Denver Avenue in Kansas City to reduce blight and fight crime. She speaks about that, and about the work of Mayor Sly James' Citizens Task Force on Violence. Then, the only business school professor ever named a MacArthur Fellow tells us why he thinks fixing income inequality in America requires increasing the number of college graduates.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From attempts to overturn Obamacare to rumors of sweeping tax reform, there's plenty going on in the federal Capitol these days — not to mention the White House. Today, Democrat Emanuel Cleaver, of Missouri, and Kansas' Republican Kevin Yoder, both U.S. representatives, discuss the issues congress is grappling with now and will likely deal with in the near future. They also share their thoughts on President Donald Trump's first 88 days in office.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Today, we learn about two bills making their way through the Missouri General Assembly; one would place stricter rules on ride-hailing businesses like Lyft and Uber, another would create a statewide prescription drug monitoring database.

Kyle Espeleta / The Orchard

After your Easter plans for this weekend are done, gather the extended family together for some movie-binging. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have recommendations for the whole clan — even that one weird cousin. (You know who we're talking about!) Pro tip: Use the spoils from the Easter egg hunt to save yourself some cash on candy at the theater.

Steve Walker

Tommy's Honour, PG

Andrew Goloida / Flickr - CC

Some symptoms of allergies are easily recognizable: itchy eyes, runny nose, congestion and coughing. But excessive ear infections and sore throats — even snoring — can be a harbinger of sensitivity in some kids to the environment. Even doctors can be challenged to suss out whether little ones have a run-of-the-mill cold or something more. Today, pediatricians offer guidance for dealing with kids suffering from allergies.

Toronto International Film Festival

With the Kansas City FilmFest going on this weekend, there's no shortage of great cinema to take in (not to mention the New York Dog Film Festival and Pooch Party). For those of us not lucky enough to get tickets to that event, though, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few recommendations that can fill the festival void.

Kashif Pathan / Flickr - CC

If President Donald Trump's budget blueprint were to become law, the agency that administers federal museum and library programs would cease to exist.

In the 2016 fiscal year, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) had a budget of $230 million. Nearly 80 percent of that money went to fund library services throughout the country, according to their website.

Mongrel Media

While certain Missouri and K-State backers may have felt a little schadenfreude last weekend, fans of KU basketball had a tougher time, as the team lost to Oregon in an Elite Eight game in Kansas City's Sprint Center. Thanks to Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics, downtrodden Jayhawks fans have something other than the ongoing NCAA basketball tournament to watch this weekend, though their recommendations may not elicit any less emotion.

Steve Walker

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For Mayor Sly James, this has been a particularly busy time. On Tuesday evening, he gave his State of the City Address, which we discuss today, along with a bond proposal James says will trim, but not eliminate, a backlog of public works projects in Kansas City, Missouri.

Sarah Craig/Faces of Fracking / Flickr - CC

While scientists have gained a clearer understanding of what's causing recent earthquakes in the Great Plains, they haven't reached a point where people can let their guard down. That's according to Heather DeShon, associate professor and seismologist at Southern Methodist University.

"The earthquakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas ... have been linked to a process called wastewater injection," she says.

In that process, large volumes of salty, briny water are deposited into cavities in deep rock layers, says DeShon.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When Mamie Hughes first came to Kansas City, back in the early 1950s, things were a bit different than they are now.

"I used to wish I had a dollar for every time I was called n-----," says the 87-year-old.

Maj. Geoff Legler / Oklahoma National Guard

Donald Trump took over the Oval Office two months ago, and his trade policies are having an effect. Today, we'll find out how his search for better deals is creating divisions in Dawson County, Nebraska. Then, learn how building techniques, borrowed from construction practices in hurricane zones, can help Tornado Alley homes stand up to spring's strong winds.

Writers Guild Foundation

Despite its shoestring budget and remarkably short shooting schedule, High Noon is revered among cinephiles. Today, author Glenn Frankel reveals how the 1952 film reflects the turbulent political climate of the Red Scare. Then: Buildings can affect our sleep, what we eat and how we feel.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

If you're looking for a public-service job in law enforcement, the Johnson County Sheriff's Office wants to talk to you.

That's according to Sheriff Calvin Hayden, who says his department is a long way from where they need to be staffed — 50 uniformed deputies short, to be exact.

"That's our huge issue right now," he says. "Recruiting is our No. 1 priority for this year."

Hayden, who took office in January, attributed the deficiency to the increased criticism law enforcers are receiving.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Bloch family has given a lot to Kansas City, including a donation of 29 masterworks by Impressionist and Post-Impressionist artists of the late 19th century to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Today we're live from the Bloch Galleries, previewing the collection's new home inside the museum. 

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