Laura Spencer

Arts Reporter

Laura Spencer caught the radio bug more than a decade ago when she was asked to read a newscast on the air on her first day volunteering for KOOP, the community radio station in Austin, Texas. 

After moving home to Kansas City, she learned the fine art of editing reel-to-reel tape as an intern and graduate assistant with the nationally syndicated literary program New Letters on the Air. Since 2001, she's focused her efforts on writing and producing feature stories as KCUR's Arts Reporter. 

In 2011, Laura was one of 21 journalists selected for USC Annenberg’s seventh National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Arts Journalism Institute in Theater and Musical Theater. She's received awards from the Associated Press, Kansas City Art Institute (Excellence in Visual Art and Education), Kansas City Association of Black Journalists, Missouri Broadcasters Association, Radio-Television News Directors Association (regional Edward R. Murrow Award) and Society for Professional Journalists. 

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Arts & Culture
11:13 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Budget Cuts Proposed For KCMO Cultural Organizations

Cultural organizations in Kansas City, Mo., such as the American Jazz Museum and the Kansas City Zoo, could be facing budget cuts.

The city’s proposed budget for the next fiscal year calls for the following reductions: 

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Arts & Culture
11:23 am
Sun February 22, 2015

LISTEN: Lawrence Poet Mark Hennessy On Poetry As Performance

Lawrence poet Mark Hennessy, former vocalist and lyricist of the band PAW, has published two books of poetry.
Credit Karen Matheis / Larryville Artists

Throughout the 1990s, Mark Hennessy was the frontman for the hard rock Lawrence band PAW. After the band broke up in 2000, Hennessy turned his focus to writing — and continued performing.

"I think performance of poetry offers opportunities to communicate in ways that the page just doesn't," says Hennessy. 

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Arts & Culture
7:55 am
Fri February 20, 2015

Building An Art Collection In Kansas City 'Piece By Piece'

An installation view at the Kemper Museum.
courtesy: Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

Art collecting can be a hobby, a passion, or even an obsession. An exhibition at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Piece by Piece: Building a Collection, takes a look at the holdings of one Kansas City couple — and the connection between collector and artist.

A contemporary collection grows by a piece or two at a time

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Arts & Culture
6:25 am
Wed February 18, 2015

Kasey Rausch, On A New Album And 'Learning To Carve' Her Own Path

Singer-songwriter Kasey Rausch will attend, and perform during, the Folk Alliance International conference in Kansas City, Mo.
Credit Paul Andrews

Folk Alliance International kicks off its annual conference —and a new Music Fair — Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo. The five-day event is expected to draw nearly 3,000 musicians from around the world. 

Local folk performers will also be in the spotlight, such as Kasey Rausch. The singer-songwriter's latest full-length album, her third, is called Guitar in Hand. It's her first CD since 2007. 

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Arts & Culture
5:23 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Remembering Organist John Obetz

Organist John Obetz.
Credit courtesy of the family

Organist John Obetz, of Leawood, Kan., died Thursday morning in hospice care. He suffered from a rare and aggressive form of cancer. Obetz was 81. 

The former dean of the Kansas City Chapter of the American Guild of Organists, Obetz played what’s been called the king of instruments — the pipe organ. As an associate professor at the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance for three decades, he taught countless students to do the same.

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Arts & Culture
3:21 pm
Thu February 12, 2015

Nebraska Artist Sends Kansas City A Valentine In Lights

Lights on stands in the windows of Mayor Sly James' office at City Hall. A microcontroller takes care of the timing of the message.
Laura Spencer KCUR

Flashing lights are sending a message from the windows of downtown Kansas City, Mo., buildings. In Morse code, a signal taps out "LUV U." The light installation, in eight locations from City Hall to the Central Library, is called Message Matters. 

The project by Nebraska-based artist Jamie Burmeister, first appeared at the Bemis Center of Contemporary Art in Omaha, Neb. 

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Arts & Culture
2:35 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

Actor Kyle Hatley Takes A Heroic Journey In 'An Iliad'

Actor Kyle Hatley (The Poet) in Kansas City Rep's 'An Iliad.'
Don Ipock Kansas City Repertory Theatre

"This is the story of two great fighters: Achilles and Hector," says the Poet, a storyteller played by Kyle Hatley in the Kansas City Repertory Theatre's production of An Iliad. "What drove them to fight? The gods." 

An Iliad, adapted for the stage by Lisa Peterson and Kansas City native Denis O'Hare, is based on "The Iliad," a nearly 3,ooo-year-old epic poem attributed to Homer. The story takes place in the final year of the 10-year war between the Greeks and the Trojans.

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Arts & Culture
7:30 am
Sun February 8, 2015

LISTEN: Novelist Whitney Terrell On The Consequences Of An IED Attack

Novelist Whitney Terrell
Credit Gayle Levy / courtesy of the author

In 2006, Whitney Terrell experienced the conflict in Iraq first-hand as an embedded reporter — and wrote about it for NPR, Slate, and The Washington Post. 

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Arts & Culture
9:04 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

Community Gathers To Talk About A New Cultural District

(at right) Seft Hunter, president of the Historic Manheim Park Association, talked with area residents on Thursday at the Bancroft School Apartments.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

A three-day public planning charrette — a workshop exploring the potential of a new cultural district — wraps up on Saturday afternoon. For the last few months, community volunteers in work teams have met to generate ideas about what this district could look like. 

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Arts & Culture
9:55 am
Thu February 5, 2015

The Nelson-Atkins Museum Gears Up For Big Data To Shape Visitor Experiences

Julián Zugazagoitia is the director and CEO of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

Big Data – it’s a catch phrase these days. But museums in cities across the country, from New York to Dallas to Cleveland, are taking cues from corporations and shopping malls, and collecting data to track visitor behavior. It’s starting to shape what’s on view.

In December, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art hired Doug Allen as its first chief information officer, to help analyze data and map a technology strategy.

"Technology will allow us to enrich the experience of a visit, and also allow for a pre-visit," says director and CEO Julián Zugazagoitia.

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Arts & Culture
4:22 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

KC Rep Inches Closer To $5 Million Goal For Renovations

An exterior view of the updated Spencer Theatre.
Helix Architecture + Design

Kansas City Repertory Theatre will announce Tuesday that it’s close to its $5 million fundraising goal for renovations. To date, $4,793, 700 has been raised. 

The Hall Family Foundation contributed a $3 million lead gift. The Rep received other major gifts from individual donors and foundations, such as the Marion and Henry Bloch Family Foundation, Richard J. Stern Foundation for the Arts, and the William T. Kemper Foundation for the Arts. 

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Arts & Culture
5:57 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Kansas City Star Lays Off Art Critic Alice Thorson

Art critic Alice Thorson has worked for the Kansas City Star since 1991. On Monday, she was told that her job was eliminated.

Over the last decade, major newspapers and magazines across the country have cut back on arts coverage. 

Editors at The Kansas City Star notified art critic Alice Thorson on Monday that Feb. 6 would be her last day. The termination did not come as a surprise for Thorson, the paper's art critic since 1991. She knew she was "on borrowed time," she says. In 2009, Thorson's full-time job was reduced to part-time; theater critic Robert Trussell’s position was downsized at the same time. 

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Arts & Culture
3:49 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Number 2 Conductor At Kansas City Symphony Vies For Top Spot In Knoxville

Aram Demirjian, associate conductor of the Kansas City Symphony, started with KCS in 2012 as assistant conductor.
Credit courtesy: Kansas City Symphony

The Kansas City Symphony's associate conductor, Aram Demirjian, just on the heels of conducting his first classical series concert in Kansas City, is one of six finalists for music director of the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra (KSO). 

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Arts & Culture
5:30 am
Sun January 25, 2015

LISTEN: Natasha Ria El-Scari On Black Poets Speaking Out

Natasha Ria El-Scari.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

Spoken word artist Natasha Ria El-Scari is a self-described feminist, educator, and a mother of two.

"I've always written out of the expression of love," says El-Scari. "Not out of the expression of pain." But she says she was "urged to do so" by the movement Black Poets Speak Out, which started in response to the events in Ferguson, Mo.

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Arts & Culture
7:30 am
Sun January 18, 2015

LISTEN: Lawrence Poet Brian Daldorph On Playing Poker With Death

Poet Brian Daldorph reading his work at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library.
Credit Ann Palmer Photography

Poet Brian Daldorph is an assistant professor in the English department at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. Since 2001, he’s led a creative writing class for inmates at the Douglas County Jail. This experience has inspired his own work. 

For our new series WORD, Daldorph reads "One Time." 

All of our WORD readings, including bonus tracks by some poets, are archived on SoundCloud. 

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Arts & Culture
9:36 am
Thu January 15, 2015

The Glenwood Arts Theatre Closes On Metcalf

Mark Mossman changed the Glenwood Arts marquee on Thursday to announce the move from the (closed) Metcalf South Mall. Plans calls for merging with Leawood Theatre to become the Glenwood Arts at 95th and Mission Road.
Credit Julie Denesha / KCUR

When the Glenwood Arts Theatre at the Metcalf South Shopping Center closes on Jan. 25, it marks the end of an era, nearly 50 years of a Glenwood theater on Metcalf. 

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Up To Date
10:48 am
Wed January 14, 2015

Reproduction Of Harry S. Truman Portrait To Be Unveiled Wednesday At Library

This 1945 portrait of Harry S. Truman will be the latest addition to the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. A reproduction will be on permanent display at the Plaza branch of the Kansas City Public Library.
Credit Kansas City Missouri Public Library

    

A portrait from the early days of Harry S. Truman's presidency goes on display Wednesday at the Plaza branch of the Kansas City Public Library. A reproduction of the 1945 original, the painting is the latest addition to the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery.

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Arts & Culture
7:30 am
Sun January 11, 2015

LISTEN: Kansas City Poet Stanley Banks On Driving While Black

Stan Banks, and his wife Janet Banks, are both poets. Stan's poems launch our new series called WORD.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

For nearly 20 years, poet Stanley Banks has taught creative writing classes at Avila University in Kansas City, Mo. An assistant professor of English, Banks is also an artist in residence. 

For our new series WORD, Banks reads the poem "Racial Profiling on A Visit to Emporia." 

All of our WORD readings, including bonus tracks by some poets, are archived on SoundCloud.

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Arts & Culture
8:01 am
Fri January 9, 2015

100 Years On, Kansas City Arts Organizations Explore Impact Of WWI

On Christmas Eve, singers with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City's Veterans Chorus gathered at the Liberty Memorial to mark the centennial of the Christmas truce of 1914. They sang 'Silent Night' in three languages.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

In 1914, at the outbreak of World War I, many artists put their art-making on hold, leaving their studios for the battlefield. Some in the United States waited for years for their country to enter the conflict, and others forged a new path in neutral Switzerland. It was a time of radical approaches in music, visual arts and literature. And now, local arts organizations are marking the centennial of the Great War. 

Music reflects change

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Arts & Culture
12:07 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

Recent Deaths In The Arts Community Spark Reflection

Drummer Tommy Ruskin died on New Year's Day.
Credit courtesy of the family

Three notable arts figures died in Kansas City in recent weeks: Ann K. Brown, Brenda Nelson, and Tommy Ruskin.

Drummer Tommy Ruskin, 72, died the morning of Jan. 1, after a long illness.

A native of Kansas City, Ruskin’s career spanned nearly half a century. He began performing as a teenager with singers such as Marilyn Maye, and went on to play with other jazz greats like Al Cohn, Scott Hamilton, Gene Harris, Zoot Sims, and Bill Watrous.

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Arts & Culture
5:45 am
Tue December 23, 2014

A New Christmas Novel, Inspired By Charles Dickens, Takes Place In Topeka

Thomas Fox Averill's latest novel tells the story of Carol Dickens, whose life is in transition. She turns to cooking Victorian holiday meals, inspired by 'A Christmas Carol.'
Credit courtesy: Topeka Public Library

As a novelist, Thomas Fox Averill has explored country music, southwestern cuisine, Scotch whisky and the poetry of Robert Burns. 

Averill's fourth novel, A Carol Dickens Christmas, is a Christmas story, set in his hometown of Topeka, Kan. It's filled with recipes, puns, and modern characters inspired by Charles Dickens.  

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Arts & Culture
11:45 am
Mon December 22, 2014

Memorabilia Of Federal Reserve Employees Turned Into Art

The public sculpture project, commissioned by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, went on display in November 2014.
Credit courtesy: University of Kansas

More than 50 University of Kansas students, faculty and staff collaborated – over four semesters – to create a public sculpture project. The commissioned art, completed in mid-November, marked the 100th anniversary of the Federal Reserve System.

According to associate professor of art Matthew Burke, the team sifted through a collection of employee memorabilia, such as pens, stamps, and nameplates. 

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Arts & Culture
5:32 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Warren Rosser Steps Down As Chair Of KCAI's Painting Department

'View From the Top,' oil on clayboard, 2013
courtesy: Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art, KCMO

This week, colleagues and friends marked a ceremonial passing of the torch as Warren Rosser stepped down as chair of the painting department at the Kansas City Art Institute. 

"After 28 years, I think it was time to pass it on to someone else, so to speak," he says.

Rosser's tenure as chair of the department is reportedly the longest, to date. He's taught at the Art Institute for 42 years, and says he will continue to do so. 

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Arts & Culture
3:16 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Kansas City's New Director Of Creative Services Names Her Top Three Priorities

Megan Crigger has been appointed the first Director of Creative Services for Kansas City, Mo. She starts on January 5.
Credit courtesy of Artist INC.

Kansas City, Mo., officials announced the first director of creative services Wednesday. 

Megan Crigger is an arts professional with nearly 20 years of experience in Austin, Texas. Most recently, she served as that city's cultural arts division manager with a focus on tourism, arts and culture. 

"Things that are my priority so align with what Kansas City is focused on that it just feels like a great natural fit," Crigger says. 

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Arts & Culture
5:57 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

A Thomas Hart Benton Painting Returns To Missouri

President Harry Truman, a native of Missouri, acquired Thomas Hart Benton's 'The New Fence,' so the college could present it to Sir Winston Churchill.
Credit courtesy: National Churchill Museum

It's been away for nearly 70 years, but this week, a Thomas Hart Benton painting called "The New Fence" returned to Missouri. 

In 1946, Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., gifted the Benton painting to Sir Winston Churchill. It was Churchill’s request, in lieu of payment, for a college lecture that later became known as the historic “Iron Curtain” speech.

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Arts & Culture
2:19 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

Submit Your Story Or Poem To WORD

The KCUR Arts team asked for submissions on December 5, 2014. Since then we’ve received more than 200 poems, essays, and short stories to consider. From those, we’ve already selected the first few months of Word episodes.

But we still have a lot of submissions to read, and because we want to give all of them a thoughtful review, we’re hitting “Pause” and closing submissions for now. More information is here.

Thank you for your interest in WORD.

Arts & Culture
11:44 am
Wed December 3, 2014

Former Secretary Of State Madeleine Albright's Jewelry Diplomacy

Serpent Pin, circa 1860. Designer unknown. Secretary Albright wore this golden snake brooch to a meeting on Iraq after Saddam Hussein's press called her a serpent.
John Bigelow Taylor

As U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and then the first female Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright often signaled her mood or opinions with the brooch she had pinned to her suit. 

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Arts & Culture
6:06 am
Wed December 3, 2014

The Missing Piece Of The J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain Returns

Workers on Tuesday prepared to remove the sculptures, and installed a fence around the J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain in Mill Creek Park.
Credit Laura Spencer / KCUR

The bronze figures on horseback and children riding fish that are part of the J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain near the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, Mo., will be removed Wednesday for an extensive renovation.

"This is the iconic fountain for Kansas City," says Jocelyn Ball-Edson, landscape architect for the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department. "We have a lot of fountains. We love them all, but this is probably the one that gets the most photography and the most visibility."

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Arts & Culture
5:28 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

Curator Danny Orendorff On An Artistic Response To Ferguson

Kansas City artist Sean Starowitz collaborated with Lauren Tweedle on this flag project for The Griot Museum of Black History, one of more than a dozen galleries in St. Louis, Mo. showing work responding to the death of Michael Brown.
Credit courtesy of the artist

Ferguson, Mo., has been a site of civil unrest since August when Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed by police officer Darren Wilson. Tensions flared again last week when a grand jury decided not to indict Wilson.

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Arts & Culture
11:05 am
Mon December 1, 2014

PHOTOS: A Glimpse At Johnson County's Mid-Century Modern Architecture

A new exhibition at the Johnson County Museum in Shawnee, Kan., attempts to answer a tough question: What is modernism?

After World War II, architecture across the United States went through a radical, modern transformation. And Johnson County, Kan. was no exception. It was a time when North Americans believed "the future was bright and possibilities were endless."

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