Julie Denesha

Digital Media Specialist

Julie Denesha is a freelance documentary photographer based in the Kansas City area.

Julie graduated from The University of Kansas in 1993, with degrees in Journalism and Russian Language and Literature. After college, she worked as a staff photographer for The Kansas City Star. In 1995, she moved to Europe and from 1996 to 2004, Julie was based in Prague, Czech Republic, where she covered Central and Eastern Europe for newspapers and magazines. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Time, Newsweek, The Economist and The Christian Science Monitor.

After moving back to the United States, Julie spent three years working as a photo editor for The Washington Times.

In 2007, Julie was awarded both a Fulbright and a Milena Jesenská Fellowship to continue her ongoing project on the Roma in Slovakia. Her project on the Roma was featured in an exhibit of the Roma at the U.S. Embassy in Bratislava, Slovakia, The World Bank in Brussels, Belgium, The Half King Gallery in New York, and The Institute For Human Sciences in Vienna, Austria.

View more of Julie's work on her website.

Ways To Connect

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Historic Kansas City Foundation releases a list each year of buildings and city landmarks in danger of being lost due to demolition or neglect. This year’s "endangered" buildings include the oldest in the Crossroads, Lane Blueprint Building, as well as Disney’s Laugh-o-Gram studios, and the Country Club Plaza

Julie Denesha / KCUR

For most dancers, the off-season is a time of rest and recuperation from the rigors of performance. But six months ago, Kansas City Ballet dancers Anthony Krutzkamp and Logan Pachciarz began to plan a more ambitious summer break.

Art is not always easy

Laura Spencer / KCUR

It’s been two years since officials at the University of Missouri-Kansas City unveiled a plan for a downtown arts campus, which would relocate the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance. On Wednesday, the Muriel McBrien Kauffman Foundation announced a pledge of $20 million to support the effort.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

With the opening this week of The Death of Cupid at the downtown performance space The Living Room, author and director Kyle Hatley is revisiting a play he's been refining since 2008. Its eternal themes of peace, war and sex have its roots in ancient Greece but still maintain a relevance to what the world looks like today.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The click of a hair curler and a spritz of hairspray punctuated conversation in the small side room of Monarch Watch, a conservation project based at the University of Kansas. Normally home to a display of tarantulas, the room on Friday was transformed into a dressing room for New York-based dancer Gwynedd Vetter-Drusch, who wore a black unitard decorated with sequins. In one corner of the room were the vividly-colored orange and black silk butterfly wings that would complete her metamorphosis.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

This year's Heart of America Shakespeare Festival production of As You Like It, one of the Bard's romantic comedies, is set in 1967. And it's been at least 15 years since the festival presented a "full modern dress production," according to the festival's executive artistic director Sidonie Garrett who recalls it was Measure for Measure in 1998.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Alvin Ailey was an African American choreographer who founded the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in New York City. For the past 25 years, Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey have held AileyCamp, a month-long session for junior high-age students, to honor Ailey's work.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Kansas City Board of Trade is slated to close its trading floor on June 28 after more than 150 years in Kansas City. In December, CME Group bought the exchange and plans to move operations to Chicago. The Board of Trade building at 4800 Main is on the market, including one of Jac T. Bowen's sculptures.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Heart Of America Shakespeare Festival celebrates its 21st season in Southmoreland Park with the comedy As You Like It. This year, the production is set in 1967 and the costumes and music hearken back to the Summer of Love.

Act Three, Scene Two, In The Forest of Arden

In this scene, Rosalind, played by Carla Noack, is banished from her uncle's court. She takes refuge in the Forest of Arden disguised as the boy, Ganymede. There she meets Orlando, played by Todd Carlton Lanker.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The 13th Annual West 18th Street Fashion Show started at dusk on June 8, and drew a crowd of onlookers both on the street and from the windows above.

Camera phones flashed as models, wearing the creations of eighteen designers, pranced on a lighted runway in the canyon between buildings lining 18th Street. Behind-the-scenes, designers made last-minute adjustments and models primped as they prepared to mount the runway. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Owen/Cox Dance Group, with pianist Kairy Koshoeva, performs its interpretation of The Goldberg Variations and brings its 2012-2013 season to a close.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art celebrated the opening of "Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection" on May 31, 2013, with an opening reception for museum members.

The exhibition showcases more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs and drawings collected by the Gelmans in their adopted homeland of Mexico.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

New theater companies and performance spaces are increasingly popping up in Kansas City. So when the American Heartland Theatre announced it was closing its doors in August, it was a startling development, especially to an actor like Debra Bluford, who has spent a good deal of her acting life there.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

It was once a barbeque joint, then a Colombian restaurant. But now this storefront in Strawberry Hill has traded out sizzling slabs of ribs and empanadas for another kind of oven: a kiln.

The Epic Arts studio is the brainchild of Steve Curtis, a photographer and community organizer for Community Housing of Wyandotte County. Curtis has long wanted to make art more accessible in Wyandotte County.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The signature style of the vocal group Octarium is eight singers, blended into one voice. After a decade of performances, this weekend marks the group's farewell concert. Octarium anticipates continuing to perform at least once a year, over the holidays.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

This marks Artistic Director William Whitener's final season with the Kansas City Ballet. After 17 years with the company, he's preparing to return to New York. Whitener answered a few questions before the final performances.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

This Sunday, the lawn of The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art will be transformed into the main stage for the larger-than-life puppets of StoneLion's puppet pageant "Mother’s Day for Mother Earth." 

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Kansas City Ballet tops off its 55th season with a playful mix of dance.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The new director of the International Center for Music at Park University says the young musicians who study in the program often arrive with the same dream. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Love conquers all in "The Mikado," a comic opera by Arthur Sullivan and W. S. Gilbert introduced in London in 1885. The Lyric Opera of Kansas City presents the satirical comedy in five performances through April 28.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The play Kansas City Swing is set in Kansas City in 1947 when the nation was on the cusp of great change.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

In Lenexa, Kansas, a local, family-owned distillery is producing craft spirits in a micro-distillery. Dark Horse Distillery was established in 2010, and since 2011, the Garcia clan has been producing bourbon, whiskey, and vodka hand-crafted in small batches. 

A recent edition of Central Standard featured guests from three distilleries, including Dark Horse Distillery.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

If you’re from Kansas, or even from Kansas City, Missouri, no matter where you go in the world, someone’s going to make a crack about Dorothy, or Toto.

Or how about this witty remark? “You’re not in Kansas any more, are you?”

The latest Hollywood blockbuster, Oz the Great and Powerful, brings it all back. The movie tells the back-story of the Wizard, who also happened to hail from Sunflower State.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Musical Theater Heritage opens their 11th season with the Kansas City premiere of Stephen Sondheim's "Sunday in the Park With George." The musical explores the intense single-mindedness of artist Georges Seurat during the creation of "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte."

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Dublin-born Irish musician Eddie Delahunt, has lived in Kansas City since 1989. His first St. Patrick's Day celebration in Kansas City took him by surprise. "The Kelly green was everywhere and I went, 'Oh my gosh, what is this?' I was in shock." Delahunt said.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

St. Patrick's Day is a cultural and religious holiday that takes place every March 17 – and it’s been embraced widely in America by descendants of Irish immigrants. Kansas City's celebration began early this year with the annual St. Pat’s Senior Ball.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Kansas City Ballet’s "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is a Shakespeare comedy performed in dance. The process of developing a character through movement and pantomime is one that often takes a close collaboration between dancer and choreographer.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

True/False Film Fest celebrated its tenth year, February 28 - March 3, 2013, presenting forty-two full-length documentaries and sixteen short films from around the globe. In addition to the films, the Columbia, Mo. festival hosts musicians, art installations, and events.

KBIA interviewed filmmakers whose work screened at this year's True/False. Read or listen to the interviews here.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

"The Flying Dutchman" is an early opera by Richard Wagner. And, like many of Wagner's later works, it's rooted in myth. The Lyric Opera of Kansas City presents this tale of a ghost captain, cursed to roam the high seas. Every seven years, the captain goes ashore – and if he finds true love, he’ll be released from the curse.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

Composer Paul Rudy's favorite moments in music are accidents. His new work, Martian Chronicles, will have a different sound each time it is played. Rudy takes gleeful pleasure in allowing musicians so much freedom.

Pages