Jason Rosenbaum

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

Government
7:51 am
Mon September 15, 2014

It's Time To Answer The Five Burning Questions From Veto Session

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:06 pm

From looking at the raw numbers, Republican legislators might consider the Missouri General Assembly’s recent veto session a smashing success.

After all, the Republican-controlled body overrode 10 of Gov. Jay Nixon’s vetoes – and even more of his line-item vetoes. Nixon even faced a blistering condemnation from a Democratic senator over his response to Ferguson.

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Five Things To Watch For During Legislative Veto Session

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 1:53 pm

Updated Tuesday with audio from the "St. Louis on the Air" veto session preview. 

The Missouri General Assembly’s veto session, which begins Wednesday, generally shuffles into the background during an election year. While legislators could have very busy day (or two), the unrest in Ferguson has sucked up most of the state’s political oxygen this year.

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Community
3:34 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

For Michael Brown, Wheels Of Justice May Turn Slowly

Protestor Allen Smith holds his sign up for passing traffic as he stands outside of the QuikTrip Gas station that was burned down in Ferguson. It may be awhile before investigators determine whether to bring state or federal charges against a Ferguson police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Originally published on Tue August 12, 2014 9:48 pm

St. Louis Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed has an idea about what’s driving the frustration about Michael Brown’s death. 

As federal and local investigations into Brown’s shooting death unfold, Reed said more and more people want details and quick action. They want to know what really happened when a Ferguson police officer shot the 18-year-old last Saturday.

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Elections
8:46 am
Mon August 4, 2014

Lessons Learned In Missouri's Relatively Tranquil Primary Season

Councilman Steve Stenger and St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 10:05 am

By any conceivable measure, Missouri doesn’t have a particularly robust election cycle this year. But that doesn't mean that there aren't lessons to learn.

Even though this year's primary season featured fewer contested races than usual, the past few months still produced twists, turns and surprises. That’s especially true because a number of ballot initiatives were placed on the August ballot, making up for a relative dearth of competitive legislative contests.

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Government
7:55 am
Wed July 2, 2014

Five Things You Need To Know About Transportation Tax

Originally published on Wed July 30, 2014 11:42 am

Missourians will vote Aug. 5 on a 0.75 percent sales tax increase for transportation projects. The proposal — commonly known as the transportation tax — would generate billions of dollars over the next decade to fix roads, repair bridges and improve mass transit. 

The stakes are high. Supporters say Missouri needs more money for its aging transportation infrastructure. With gas tax revenue dwindling and federal funding uncertain, some policymakers see the sales tax as a guaranteed way to fund transportation needs.

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NPR Story
8:23 am
Mon June 30, 2014

St. Louis' Newly Wed Gay Couples Reflect On Why Attitudes On Gay Marriage Have Shifted

Tod Martin, left, and David Gray speak at a press conference last week. St. Louis officials married the couple last week, sparking a challenge -- and public reflection -- of the state's gay marraige ban.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 10:07 pm

Tod Martin wasn’t going to let 20 words keep him from marrying David Gray.

While it took more than 20 years, St. Louis officials last week issued Martin and Gray a marriage license. They’re among eight people who are testing the state’s nearly 10-year-old, 20-word ban on gay marriage.

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Missouri Statehouse
9:20 am
Wed May 28, 2014

In Missouri Senate, Justus Went From Partisan To Pragmatist

Senate Minority Leader Jolie Justus, D-Kansas City, will leave the Missouri Senate later this year. She reflected on her time in state legislative office before the end of this year's session.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 9:59 am

The Missouri Senate had seven new members after the smoke cleared from the 2006 election cycle. Only two served for the maximum time allowed under term limits – Senate Minority Leader Jolie Justus, D-Kansas City, and state Sen. Brad Lager, R-Savannah.

The two lawmakers are at the opposite ends of the political spectrum. Justus entered the General Assembly as a combative fighter who fought tooth-and-nail against the Republican majority. Lager, who was arguably more conservative than his Republican counterparts, seemed on a course for higher office.

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