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12:20 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

'Fresh Air' Remembers Actor Meshach Taylor

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. The actor Meshach Taylor died on June 28 at the age of 67. We're going to remember him by listening back to our 1990 interview. Taylor was best known for his role on the TV sitcom "Designing Women" playing Anthony Bouvier, an ex-convict who's a deliveryman for a company of women interior designers in Atlanta. He eventually became their partner in the company.

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News
12:15 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In California Town, Protests Shed Light On National Immigration Debate

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'll start today by talking about immigration and the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border. We've been reporting on the search of illegal border crossings, particularly of unaccompanied children. And we're talking about how federal authorities have been scrambling to shelter these would-be migrants and meet the demands of the law for evaluating each person's circumstances.

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Shots - Health News
11:45 am
Mon July 7, 2014

With Gene Disorders, The Mother's Age Matters, Not The Egg's

All of the eggs that a woman carries are produced while she's still in her mother's womb.
Pascal Goetgheluck Science Source

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 2:47 pm

We women are all too aware that as we get older the risk of having a baby with genetic disorders goes up. All of a woman's eggs are primed up and ready to go before we are born. But the ones we ovulate later are more prone to genetic errors than the earlier ones.

As a friend of mine surmised, "We age, so you kind of think our eggs would, too."

For a long time, doctors have thought that was because the eggs formed earlier are better than those formed later. They call it the "production-line hypothesis."

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Early Afghan Vote Count Gives Ex-Finance Minister The Lead

Afghanistan's presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani leads his rival, Abdullah Abdullah, in the Afghan presidential runoff.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:18 pm

Former Afghan Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani is in the lead to succeed Hamid Karzai as the country's next president, according to preliminary results Monday from the disputed vote.

The country's Independent Election Commission said Ghani had 56.44 percent of the vote. His main rival, Abdullah Abdullah, received 43.56 percent. The results were due last week but were delayed amid Abdullah's allegations of widespread fraud.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Will You Ride The World's Tallest Water Slide?

A view from the top of the Verrückt water slide's launch point, in a video that showed a recent test of the slide.
Schlitterbahn Development Group

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:36 am

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Afghanistan
11:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Preliminary Results Show Ghani Winning Afghan Presidency

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Preliminary results are out for the run-off in Afghanistan's presidential elections. And the winner seems to be former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani. His opponent, Abdullah Abdullah, was considered the front-runner after winning 45 percent of the vote in the first round back in April. Now Ashraf Ghani appears to be winning with almost a million more votes than Abdullah. NPR's Sean Carberry joins us from Kabul. Good morning.

SEAN CARBERRY, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Dozens Of Women Reportedly Escape Nigeria's Boko Haram

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:32 am

More than 60 women and girls who had been abducted by Nigerian extremist group Boko Haram have reportedly escaped to freedom, after their captors left for a raid. More than 200 schoolgirls abducted in April remain missing.

Nigerian officials say 68 women were abducted two weeks ago in the country's northeast. The Associated Press, citing a vigilante leader in the town of Maiduguri, reports that 63 of them made it to safety over the weekend.

From Dakar, NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports for our Newscast unit:

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NPR Ed
7:36 am
Mon July 7, 2014

What We Don't Know About Summer School

While their friends line up for ice cream, some students are stuck in summer school.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:01 am

It's a warning echoed in countless teen movies — "If you don't pass this class, you'll go to summer school!" Kids for generations have been threatened with the elusive summer school: fail this test, miss this day and kiss your vacation goodbye.

This summer is no exception, with districts around the country pulling students in for all sorts of programs. But surprisingly, it's really hard to get a head count — either nationally or at the district level — of how many kids are going to summer school.

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Mon July 7, 2014

TSA Tightens Rules For Devices At Overseas Airports

In Paris, soldiers patrol at Charles de Gaulle Airport last week. French airports have reportedly agreed to a new TSA policy requiring electronic devices to be powered up before they're allowed on U.S.-bound flights.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 3:55 pm

Update at 4:54 p.m. ET

People flying to the U.S. on international flights may want to keep their cellphones charged: Under a new policy, these and other devices might not be allowed on the plane if they can't power up.

The Transportation Security Administration says its new guideline is aimed at certain airports that have direct flights to the U.S. Officials at those overseas facilities should require passengers to turn on electronic devices before they're allowed to board, the TSA says.

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Around the Nation
6:55 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Firecracker Man Calls Himself A Little Nuts

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Remember that old safety advice - if your fireworks don't go off, lean over the top and shake them. That's a joke but this is not. John Fletcher of Michigan celebrated Independence Day by setting off 10,500 firecrackers attached to his body. He's done this for years. In the past, he's fractured ribs and been knocked unconscious. This year, he only got a bloody nose. Though he admits, he says, he is a little nuts. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:55 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Funnel Cloud Photo Bombs Wedding Pix

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Weddings are always a whirlwind - from the engagement to the wedding photos, which for a couple in Saskatchewan, Canada involved a real tornado. As the bride and groom posed for a close-up, down the road from their ceremony a funnel cloud swirled behind them. The tornado touched down far enough behind them that the wedding photographer was able to capture the moment - perhaps the best wedding photo-bomb ever. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:50 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Hamas Vows Revenge For Fighters Killed In Air Attack

Palestinians inspect a damaged building after an Israeli airstrike in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip on Sunday.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:31 am

The Islamic militant group Hamas says it will avenge the deaths of seven militants who reportedly were killed as a result of Israeli airstrikes in the Gaza Strip. Israel says the strikes were retaliation for a burst of rocket fire from Gaza into southern Israel.

From Jerusalem, Daniel Estrin reports:

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Shots - Health News
6:07 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Stressed Out: Americans Tell Us About Stress In Their Lives

Aly Hurt/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:57 am

Everyone seems to talk about feeling stressed out. But what's the reality of stress in America these days?

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find out.

Our questions zeroed in on the effect of stress in Americans' lives. We asked about people's personal experiences with stress in the preceding month and year. We also asked about how they perceived the effects of stress, how they cope with stress and their attitudes about it.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Eduard Shevardnadze, Former Georgian President, Dies At 86

Then-Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze flashes a "V" sign in France in 1989, after attending the International Conference on Chemical Weapons. Shevardnadze died Monday at age 86.
Derrick Ceyrac AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:06 am

Former Soviet minister and Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze, who is credited with helping end the Cold War, died Monday after a long illness, his spokeswoman tells the media.

To remind you of the former leader's career, NPR's Corey Flintoff has this report for our Newscast unit:

"White-haired and dapper, Eduard Shevardnadze was the face of Soviet foreign policy during the era when President Mikhail Gorbachev was attempting to liberalize the Communist bloc.

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Remembrances
5:49 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Ex-Georgia President Eduard Shavardnadze Dies. He was 86

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's take a moment to remember Edward Shevardnazde. He was the foreign minister for the Soviet Union in the 1980s. That means he was one of the faces of the Soviet Union during its final period of reform under Mikhail Gorbachev. When that union broke apart, Shervardnazde became the president of his home republic, Georgia. And he has died at the age of 86. We're going to talk about Shevardnazde with Pavel Palazhchenko. He was an interpreter for both Gorbachev and this Shervardnazde. He's on the line. Welcome to the program.

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NPR Story
5:46 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Wash. Retailers To Sell Recreational Marijuana On Tuesday

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR Story
5:46 am
Mon July 7, 2014

'A Hard Day's Night' Premiered In London 50 Years Ago

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 3:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And here's our last word in Business today.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT")

THE BEATLES: (Singing) It's been a hard day's night, and I've been working like a dog. It's been a hard day's night, I should be sleeping like a log.

INSKEEP: You hear the screaming in the background. "A Hard Day's Night" premiered at London's Pavilion Theater on July 6, 1964.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Michelle Obama Lobbies Congress Over School Lunch Program

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

CBS Lost Appetite For Government Watchdog Stories, Attkisson Says

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson left CBS this year, she did not go quietly. She contends, the network refused to run stories that might damage President Obama. And her claims have become a flashpoint in arguments over ideological bias in the media. NPR's David Folkenflik has more.

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Video Of Extremist Sunni Group's Leader Needs To Be Confirmed

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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U.S.
2:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

A Presidential Contest ... For Obama's Library

This undated file photo released by Obama for America shows Barack Obama teaching at the University of Chicago Law School in Chicago, where he was a faculty member for more than a decade. The university is contending for his presidential library.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

There are 13 presidential Libraries in the United States run by the National Archives, and when President Obama leaves office, the construction of the 14th library won't be far behind.

A nonprofit foundation created to fund and build the Obama presidential library is already beginning to mull proposals from contenders who'd like to be home to the facility.

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Shots - Health News
2:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:14 pm

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

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The Salt
2:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers.
Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:45 am

A growing number of Americans are buying raw milk. That's milk that has not been pasteurized to kill bacteria.

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National Security
2:16 am
Mon July 7, 2014

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:51 am

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

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Around the Nation
5:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Law
2:12 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Rare Unanimity In Supreme Court Term, With Plenty Of Fireworks

The recent Supreme Court term resulted in an unusual number of unanimous decisions — but that doesn't mean there wasn't disagreement.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 2:10 pm

The nation greets the coming of July each year with fireworks on the National Mall and, days earlier, explosive decisions at the U.S. Supreme Court.

While the Mall fireworks dissipate within moments, the court's decisions will have repercussions for decades. Indeed, no sooner was the ink dry on this term's contraception decision than the court's three female justices accused their male colleagues of reneging.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

California Highway Patrol Probing Videotaped Beating Of Woman

In this July 1 image from video provided by motorist David Diaz, a California Highway Patrol officer straddles a woman while punching her on the shoulder of a Los Angeles freeway.
David Diaz AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:14 pm

The California Highway Patrol says it is investigating a video that shows an officer repeatedly punching a woman after trying to stop her from walking into traffic.

As Reuters notes: "The video, which was taken by a passing motorist, posted online and broadcast by local television stations, has caused an outcry from community activists who say the officer used excessive force in the arrest on Tuesday."

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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Novak Djokovic Beats Roger Federer For Wimbledon Title

Novak Djokovic of Serbia celebrates after defeating Roger Federer in their men's singles finals tennis match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London.
Suzanne Plunkett Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:43 pm

Novak Djokovic won his first Wimbledon championship in three years in a hard-fought contest that went five sets, denying Roger Federer's bid for a record eighth title.

Djokovic took the trophy in a 6-7, 6-4, 7-6, 5-7, 6-4 victory.

USA Today says:

"Djokovic was serving for the match at 5-3 in the fourth set but Federer broke him twice and won the set forcing the match to go the distance.

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The Two-Way
9:21 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Separate Attacks In Uganda, Kenya Leave Dozens Dead

Armed police walk past a truck set on fire by attackers who raided Gamba police station at the Kenyan coast on Sunday.
Joseph Okanga Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:47 pm

This post was updated at 12:30 p.m. ET.

At least 17 people were killed in Uganda in an attack by armed gunmen on three police stations in an area of the country that had once been the focus of an Islamic insurgency.

Meanwhile, the al-Qaida-linked group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for attacking on two coastal villages in Kenya that left at least 22 people dead. NPR's Gregory Warner, reporting from Nairobi, says the deaths in Kenya include one Russian tourist.

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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Sun July 6, 2014

Report: Most NSA-Intercepted Data From 'Ordinary Internet Users'

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:50 pm

A Washington Post analysis of data provided by Edward Snowden has revealed that nine out of 10 communications intercepted by the National Security Agency were from ordinary Internet users, not legally targeted foreigners. But the examination also showed that officials gleaned valuable intelligence from the wide net the agency cast.

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