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Shots - Health Blog
9:22 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Analysis Finds Lung Cancer Screening Worthwhile For Longtime Smokers

Dr. Steven Birnbaum positions a patient inside a CT scanner at Southern New Hampshire Medical Center in Nashua, N.H., in June 2010.
Jim Cole AP

Now there's fresh evidence that CT scans to detect early lung cancer belong on the short list of effective cancer screening technologies — at least for people at high risk.

Researchers conclude that spiral CT, which makes 3-D pictures of lungs, could reduce lung cancer deaths by 35 percent at a cost of $19,000 to $26,000 per year of life saved.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Carriers, FCC Join In Bid To Curb Cellphone Thefts

On the phone in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Wireless providers have agreed to create a national database of stolen cellphones that it is hoped will make the devices somewhat less tempting to thieves.

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, and a group of lawmakers and law enforcement officials are set to announce outlines of the plan at 10 a.m. ET.

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The Two-Way
7:20 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Tips Led To Tulsa Shooting Suspects' Arrests; Police Say They've Confessed

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 7:31 am

The key moment in the manhunt for suspects in a murder spree that terrorized African-Americans in Tulsa, Okla., came Saturday morning when a tip was called in to the city's Crime Stoppers hotline, the Tulsa World says.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Syria Says It Is Pulling Troops Back, Activists Say Army Continues To Attack

At a refugee camp in Reyhanli, Turkey, on Monday, Syrians sought help and safety.
Germano Assad AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:58 am

On this day when a U.N.-brokered cease-fire was supposed to go into effect in Syria, "activists reported military attacks on two towns ... even as the government claimed its military forces have begun pulling out" of some areas, The Associated Press reports.

The BBC says:

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Europe
6:44 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Sarkozy Bans Cheese Course At Presidential Palace

The chef at the presidential palace recently revealed that Nicolas Sarkozy has said no to the cheese course after meals. He doesn't drink, so no wine for him either.

Around the Nation
6:26 am
Tue April 10, 2012

18 Year Old Runs For Honolulu City Council Seat

If E.J. Delacruz, 18, were elected, he would be the youngest person ever to hold political office in Hawaii. Not that it will be easy. A state representative is running for the same job, which also has an incumbent seeking re-election.

The Two-Way
6:15 am
Tue April 10, 2012

George Zimmerman Launches Website And Seeks Support, Lawyer Says

TheRealGeorgeZimmerman.com

A new website — TheRealGeorgeZimmerman.com — was indeed launched over the weekend by the Florida man who shot and killed a black teenager in an incident that has ignited a national discussion about race relations and racial profiling, one of his attorneys tells local news outlets in Orlando, Fla.

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Business
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

For $1.1 Billion, Facebook Snaps Up Instagram

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Facebook likes Instagram. That's the top of our business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: And they did more than just click the little thumbs up. Facebook is buying the photo application Instagram and the price is higher than it has ever paid for an acquisition - $1 billion; this for a company with only around a dozen employees. As somebody joked yesterday, why didn't they just download it?

As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, some analysts say the purchase is a defensive move.

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Business
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Microsoft To Buy Patents From AOL For $1.1 Billion

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Moving on to another billion dollar tech deal, Microsoft has agreed to pay AOL over $1 billion for hundreds of patents. Microsoft outbid several rivals, including Amazon and eBay, in a deal which saw AOL's stock price jump by over 40 percent. The over 800 patents include internet search, email and customized advertising and are seen as a push by Microsoft into the lucrative smartphone and tablet market.

Business
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Machine Evens Sushi-Making Playing Field

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today: sushi bot.

It's where raw fish and robots meet up. More specifically, it's a cutting-edge, sushi-making machine. A company called Suzumo introduced a prototype at a food expo in Tokyo last week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: It is true that a skilled chef has trained for a long time. However, with Suzumo sushi-making machines, everyone can make stable-quality sushi very easily.

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Around the Nation
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

1921 Riot Reveals Tulsa's History Of Race Relations

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Police are still investigating whether the Tulsa shootings were racially motivated. We do know some of Tulsa's history. It has a difficult history of race relations, including a riot in 1921 that left scores, if not hundreds, of people dead.

Scott Ellsworth has studied that event closely. He's a Tulsa native who now teaches African-American history at the University of Michigan. He's on the line from Michigan Radio.

Welcome to the program.

SCOTT ELLSWORTH: Thank you very much.

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Sports
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Miami Outraged Over Guillen's Castro Comments

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And one of baseball's better-known characters, with a knack for testing the boundaries of free speech, has created a controversy in the very first week of the season. Ozzie Guillen, new manager of the Miami Marlins, is holding a press conference today in Miami to apologize. It's all about some comments he made about Cuba's Fidel Castro. Joining us now is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

MONTAGNE: OK. What did he say?

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Technology
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

'Do Not Track' Web Browser Option Gains Steam

Several Web browsers, including Mozilla's Firefox, enable users to request additional privacy online via a "do not track" button. But there's no consensus on how much privacy the button should offer users.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 10:10 am

Government regulators in the U.S. and Europe are putting pressure on the online advertising industry to adopt a new Web browser option called "do not track." The option is designed to let people request more privacy from the websites they visit.

But there's no consensus yet on how much privacy users should expect. An Internet industry task force convenes Tuesday in Washington to try to hash that out.

Some browsers, like Internet Explorer, Safari and Firefox, already come with a "do not track" button. Other browsers are expected to add the feature soon.

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Education
3:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Vets Help Others Move From Combat To College

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 4:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Thanks to the new GI Bill, which went into effect in 2009, hundreds of thousands of U.S. veterans have the opportunity to go back to school. For many veterans, heading to college or university often involves a difficult transition. Sean Bueter of member station WBOI in Fort Wayne, Indiana explains how one university is helping veterans succeed.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:43 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Calif.'s Prescription-Drug Monitoring System Feels Pain From Budget Cuts

At Universal Pain Management, Dr. Francis Riegler confers with Trudy Roberts, the clinic's nurse practitioner, over a patient's record of prescription drug purchases.
Sarah Varney KQED

This is a story about what can happen when no one is looking. For the patients at Universal Pain Management, a medical clinic in northern Los Angeles County, Dr. Francis Riegler is always looking.

Riegler huddles with the clinic's nurse practitioner over a computer printout. The one-page report from the state's drug-tracking system shows that a patient was on the hunt for more Vicodin, a powerful pain reliever that he was already getting from Riegler's clinic.

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Business
2:42 am
Tue April 10, 2012

For Freelancers, Landing A Workspace Gets Harder

Workers share office space at Grind, a co-working company in New York City. Those who want to use Grind's facilities are vetted through a competitive application process.
JaegerSloan

The recession brought widespread unemployment across the U.S., but it also prompted a spike in the number of freelance or independent workers.

More than 30 percent of the nation's workers now work on their own, and the research firm IDC projects the number of nontraditional office workers — telecommuters, freelancers and contractors — will reach 1.3 billion worldwide by 2015.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:40 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Bird Flu Studies Mired In Export Control Law Limbo

An electron microscope view of the bird flu virus.
PR Newswire

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:50 am

Scientists who created mutant forms of bird flu want to see their research published, and an influential advisory committee recently gave them the green light after a debate that lasted for months.

But one of the manuscripts is now being blocked from publication because of Dutch legal controls on the export of technology that could potentially be used for weapons.

It's just the latest example of how complicated international export control laws have affected the debate over what to do about two studies on bird flu.

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Europe
2:39 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Unemployed Greeks Look To Create Their Own Jobs

Panos Papadopoulos, 28, is the co-founder of BugSense, which makes a service to track bugs in mobile phone applications. He also mentors other young entrepreneurs at CoLab, a business incubator in Greece.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

In Greece, more than 21 percent of the working-age population is jobless. For Greeks under age 25, the rate is more than double that.

Some young Greeks are frightened that the economy, now in free fall, will take years to recover, so they're leaving for jobs abroad. A few entrepreneurs, however, are trying to start businesses during the worst recession in decades.

A magnet for these young entrepreneurs is CoLab, a business incubator in a weathered building near the Athens Cathedral in the city center. CoLab opened in 2009, with just one occupant — a Spanish travel writer.

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Law
2:38 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Federal Court To Weigh Graphic Cigarette Labels

This image provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows one of nine new warning labels it wants cigarette makers to use. Tobacco companies have sued, claiming the mandate is unconstitutional.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 7:09 am

The question of how far the government can go in forcing a business — in this case cigarette makers — to warn consumers about its product is before a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

The Food and Drug Administration wants large, graphic warning labels to scare smokers, but tobacco companies say that violates their right to free speech.

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Books News & Features
2:25 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Best Books (And Surprising Insights) On Lincoln

iStockPhoto.com

In a 24-hour, Internet-fueled news cycle, political campaign reporters often seem to be focused on what just happened, and only what just happened. But presidential candidates profess to take a longer view: They consciously link their critiques and promises to the influential figures and debates of the past.

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Author Interviews
2:24 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Carole King, From Doo-Wopper To Chart Topper

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager.
Jim McCrary

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:16 am

Carole King has an armful of Grammy Awards and countless Top 10 hits, both under her own name and as a songwriter for artists from Little Eva to the Monkees to Aretha Franklin.

Her solo album Tapestry spent 15 weeks at the top of the charts, becoming one of the biggest-selling records of all time. King managed to fit in all those hits by starting very, very young. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that she was just 15 when she and some classmates formed a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines.

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Planet Money
2:16 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Why Matzo Makers Love Regulation

Rabbi Yaakov Horowitz at the Manischewitz factory in 2007
Mike Derer AP

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 10:06 am

For more, see our video, Inside The Matzo Factory, and see Adam Davdson's latest NYT Magazine column

The matzo business may be the most heavily regulated business in the world.

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The Two-Way
7:00 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Paintball Journalism? Ex-Army Ranger, Journalists Trade Shots With Hezbollah

Meeting Hezbollah on the paintball playing field.
vice.com

"Paintballing With Hezbollah Is The Path Straight To Their Hearts," says the headline at the Vice.com newssite.

In a quest to get to better know members of the Hezbollah militia in Lebanon, four Western journalists and a former U.S. Army Ranger last year arranged to play paintball in Beirut with some men who said they were among the group's fighters.

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All Tech Considered
6:17 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Man Behind Commodore 64, Has Died

Jack Tramiel, the man behind the Commodore 64 computer, died Sunday, according to reports. Tramiel, who was 83, came to America after World War II. He was a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp in his native Poland.

Update: This post has been updated to reflect Tramiel's liberation from the Ahlem work camp, after his time in Auschwitz.

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The Two-Way
6:16 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Father Of Commodore 64 And An Auschwitz Survivor, Dies At 83

Jack Tramiel, seen in 1984, founded Commodore International as well as Atari Corp.
Sal Veder AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:35 am

Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore International, whose iconic Commodore 64 was one of the best-selling computers of all time, has died. He was 83.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:11 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Jack Tramiel, Father Of Commodore 64, Dies

Jack Tramiel, seen in 1984, founded Commodore International as well as Atari Corp.
Sal Veder AP

Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore International, whose iconic Commodore 64 was one of the best-selling computers of all time, has died. He was 83.

Forbes reports that Tramiel was born in Poland in 1928 to a Jewish family, and sent to Auschwitz during World War II. He and father were then sent to the Ahlem labor camp near Hanover from where he was rescued in 1945. He came to the U.S. in 1947 where he started Commodore as a typewriter business.

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The Two-Way
5:30 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Maryland Says Mega Millions Winner Has Come Forward

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:31 pm

The second of three winning tickets in last month's $656 million record-breaking Mega Millions lottery has been turned in, officials at the Maryland Lottery just announced.

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The Two-Way
4:35 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Obama's Off His Game — Basketball, That Is

Presidential pique at a missed shot.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Four years ago, then-candidate Barack Obama famously sank a 3-point shot when he visited U.S. troops in Kuwait who had gathered in a gym to hear from the Democratic senator. The video was a cable TV favorite for a day or two.

Today, the first hoopster's shot wasn't dropping, as Politico reports.

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All Tech Considered
4:23 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Like The Instagram-Facebook Deal? Depends On Your Filter

A photo illustration shows the photo-sharing app Instagram's fan page on Facebook's website. Facebook is acquiring Instagram for some $1 billion.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:00 pm

Facebook's decision to acquire Instagram for $1 billion set off strong reactions among Instagram users Monday, when the deal was announced. And if any users of Instagram's photo-sharing service were in love with the deal, they seemed to be keeping pretty quiet about it.

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The Salt
4:11 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Now On The Menu For Hungry Kids: Supper At School

Students at Garfield Elementary School eat dinner as part of an after-school program in Kansas City, Mo. In the past few years, a federally subsidized school dinner program has spread from six to all 50 states.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 12:34 pm

Not long after the start of the school year, Monique Sanders, a teacher at Nathan Hale Elementary School in Manchester, Conn., realized many of her students were going to bed hungry.

"It was very bad. I had parents calling me several times a week, asking did I know of any other way that they could get food because they had already gone to a food pantry," Sanders says. "The food pantry only allows you to go twice per month, so if you are running low on your food stamps or you didn't get what you needed and you're not able to feed your family, that's very stressful."

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