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Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
2:07 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Paying For College: More Tough Decisions

Kelley Hawkins (center) smiles at her daughter Carley (left) as her other daughter, Chelsea (right), looks on, in their family home in Harrisburg, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:48 am

Middle age is prime time for saving money. From your late 40s through early 60s, you're supposed to squirrel away cash to cope with health care costs in your old age.

But for millions of Americans, middle age also is the time when children are seeking help with higher-education bills, and elderly parents may be needing assistance with daily care.

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The Salt
2:06 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Jetlagged By Your Social Calendar? Better Check Your Waistline

It doesn't take a transcontinental flight to end up out of sync with your body clock. It might just be that you stay up too late.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 8:51 am

It doesn't take a transcontinental flight to end up out of sync with your body clock. It might just be that you stay up too late.

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Your Money
2:06 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Canada's Housing Market Booms; Experts See Trouble

Canada's real estate market is one of the hottest in the developed world.
Mike Cassese Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 8:51 am

Housing prices are going through the roof in Canada. The real estate market there is one of the hottest in the developed world. In Toronto, prices increased 10 percent in March alone. The average detached house in the city costs more than $600,000.

That has economists and the government worried that Canada is experiencing a housing bubble that's about to burst.

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Europe
2:04 am
Tue May 15, 2012

From Iowa To Russia, Tractors Build Economic Bridge

Employees fit a tire to a John Deere W540 combine inside the company's Domodedovo manufacturing center near Moscow, Russia. The tractors are built in Waterloo, Iowa, and then taken apart and shipped to the Russian plant for reassembly.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 8:51 pm

The green is unmistakable at a plant in Russia as workers put together a John Deere tractor. The roughly 90 employees, however, don't actually make the tractors.

The engine, the drive train and the tractor itself are all built in Waterloo, Iowa. The completed tractor is tested, and then it is disassembled and prepared for shipment.

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The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
2:03 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Sick From Fracking? Doctors, Patients Seek Answers

Michelle Salvini (left) and Terri DiCarlo take a break from work outside the Cornerstone Care clinic in Burgettstown, Pa. Mysterious fumes have repeatedly sickened clinic staffers, forcing them to evacuate the building several times.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:48 am

Kay Allen had just started work, and everything seemed quiet at the Cornerstone Care community health clinic in Burgettstown, Pa. But things didn't stay quiet for long.

"All the girls, they were yelling at me in the back, 'You gotta come out here quick. You gotta come out here quick,' " said Allen, 59, a nurse from Weirton, W.Va.

Allen rushed out front and knew right away what all the yelling was about. The whole place reeked — like someone had spilled a giant bottle of nail polish remover.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:02 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Should Parents Be Able To Sue For 'Wrongful Birth'?

Arizona state Sen. Nancy Barto, R-Phoenix, listens during a special budget briefing at the state Capitol in October 2008. Barto sponsored a new law that prohibits wrongful birth lawsuits. She says the bill "sends the message that all life is worth protecting."
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 8:51 am

Several states, including Kansas and New Jersey, are debating so-called "wrongful birth" laws that would prevent parents from suing a doctor who fails to warn them about fetal problems.

Abortion rights activists say the laws give doctors the right to withhold information so women don't have abortions.

In Suffern, N.Y., Sharon and Steven Hoffman's son, Jake, was born with Tay-Sachs, a genetic disease that mainly affects Jewish families and is usually fatal by age 4 or 5.

"There's no treatment. There's no cure. There's nothing," Sharon says.

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Family Matters: The Money Squeeze
2:01 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Caring For Grandparent Matures A Young Man

Maryland resident Nicholas McDonald, 24, has briefly abandoned his musical aspirations to enter the workforce and contribute to the family's finances. "I'd like to give my mom $100 every now and then," he says.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:47 am

Nicholas McDonald grew up tempted by drugs and under pressure to hit the streets. Lacking male role models, the Maryland resident says he always saw his mom as "the apple of my eye."

Natasha Shamone-Gilmore tried to protect her son growing up. Now, 24-year-old Nicholas is doing his best to return the favor.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:33 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

To Fight HIV, Indian Health Workers Say Homosexuality Must Be Legal

Participants carry a rainbow flag during a gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender parade in Mumbai, India.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 8:20 pm

It's just after nightfall as Anandrag Davinder, an outreach worker among Mumbai's mostly hidden community of gay men, wanders down a dark alley beside a busy railway station in Mumbai. His stop is a squalid row of urinal buildings where gay men go to meet, hidden from public view. The stench inside is overwhelming.

"This is a loo. This is a cruising center," Davinder says, stepping into the crowded, nearly pitch-black room. "All the gays are standing here only and saying, 'I like these guys. I want to do sex with this person.' "

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Syrian Violence Spills Into Neighboring Lebanon

A Sunni gunman fires during clashes in the northern port city of Tripoli, Lebanon on Monday.
Hussein Malla AP

For a third day in a row, the violence of Syria spilled into the northern city of Tripoli in Lebanon.

The AP reports that the Alawites, who support the regime of Bashar Assad, and the Sunnis, who support the Syrian uprising, traded fire in Lebanon using assault rifles and rocket propelled grenades. Five people were killed and 100 were wounded in Lebanon's second-largest city.

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National Security
4:27 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Military Looks To Redefine PTSD, Without Stigma

The U.S. military is trying to encourage service members and veterans to seek treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. The military is also seeking to remove any sense of stigma for receiving treatment. Here, military personnel attend a presentation on PTSD at Fort Hamilton Army Garrison in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 2009.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

The military and the Department of Veterans Affairs say they want more veterans and service members to get appropriate treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

That's why they're tweaking the way they define and treat PTSD. But if this approach works, it could add to the backlog of PTSD cases.

For years, the standard definition for post-traumatic stress disorder had a key feature that didn't fit for the military. It said that the standard victim responds to the trauma he or she has experienced with "helplessness and fear."

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

At Basque Cookings Clubs, Food And Fraternity Mix Heartily

Enrique Vallejo serves soup at the Amaikak Bat txoko in San Sebastian.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:52 pm

Spring crops like asparagus and sorrel are poking up all over the hemisphere. And in the autonomous region of Northern Spain known as Basque Country, people are taking that spring harvest to a txoko.

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All Tech Considered
4:17 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Draw Something App Reveals The Artistic Chimp In Us All

" href="/post/draw-something-app-reveals-artistic-chimp-us-all" class="noexit lightbox">
New Yorker cartoonist Matthew Diffee tries his hand at illustrating the word "Travolta" using the Draw Something app.
Courtesy of Matthew Diffee

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 10:23 am

Every week, as part of a new tech segment, we'll be digging into our digital sandbox for some fun. New Yorker cartoonist Matthew Diffee is starting things off with a review of Draw Something, a popular app that works a lot like Pictionary: Players pick a word, draw clues and then watch as their opponents guess the answer. But, as Diffee explains, the app's name is a bit misleading.

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Asia
4:13 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

India Debates Re-Banning Homosexuality

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:44 pm

India's Supreme Court is now weighing arguments by opponents and proponents of legal homosexuality. Same-sex relationships were decriminalized in 2009, but a number of political, social and religious groups are fighting to reinstate a colonial-era law that punished homosexual acts with prison time. Public health workers say legal recognition of India's gay community is critical in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

Shots - Health Blog
3:56 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

In Talent Hunt, Some Businesses Offer Health Benefits For Same-Sex Couples

Reaction to President Obama's bombshell that he now supports gay marriage ran the gamut from profound to lighthearted.
The White House Getty Images

President Obama's pronouncement last week in favor of same-sex marriage has no legal effect on employers' decisions on whether to offer benefits to workers' domestic partners.

But some advocates say it could reinforce a decade-long trend toward coverage.

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Election 2012
3:54 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Obama's Gay Marriage Stand May Not Sway Latinos

President Obama speaks during a campaign fundraiser Monday at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City. The event, co-hosted by gay- and lesbian-rights leaders and a Latino nonprofit, featured singer Ricky Martin.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

President Obama is attending a campaign fundraiser Monday night co-hosted by gay- and lesbian-rights leaders and a Latino nonprofit. The event is being headlined by singer Ricky Martin.

Obama maintains a commanding lead over likely GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney when it comes to support among Latino voters. But those same voters are generally regarded as socially conservative, leading some to wonder how the president's support for same-sex marriage might affect the Latino electorate.

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All Tech Considered
3:42 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Facebook's Success Hinges On How Much More It Can Learn About Us

Investors will be betting that Facebook won't make its users so uncomfortable over privacy that they quit.
Photo Illustration: Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

This week, All Things Considered is hitting refresh on its All Tech Considered segment — taking you into the changing landscape of technology and how it intersects with everyday life. From Silicon Valley to China, we'll feature stories from around the world, stay on top of innovations that matter — and get you the news you need to know. Every Monday, we'll preview the week's big tech stories.

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Europe
3:42 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Europe's Austerity Plans Face Growing Backlash

Spanish protesters gathered in Madrid on Saturday as the country's economic problems continued to worsen. The country's banking system is seen as particularly vulnerable.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 10:45 pm

A political crisis in Greece and economic woes in Spain are again raising concern about the future of the eurozone.

In Athens today, Greek politicians tried again and failed to form a coalition government, though talks are ongoing. There is growing fear that Greece will not be able to remain in the currency union and avoid defaulting on its debts.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:42 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Garth Knox: One Viola And 1,000 Years Of Musical History

On Garth Knox's new album, Saltarello, the adventurous violist creates surprising musical juxtapositions.
Dániel Vass ECM Records

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

Garth Knox was born to play the viola. As a youngster, he already had two sisters who played violin and a brother who played cello. "So for the family string quartet," Knox says, "it was very clear from the start which instrument I would play."

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The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Striking Deal With Israel, Palestinian Prisoners Will End Hunger Strike

Palestinians hold pictures of prisoners and Palestinian flags as they celebrate the end of a prisoners' hunger strike in Israeli jails, in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Monday.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 7:41 am

Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners agreed to end a hunger strike, today. In exchange, Israel agreed to end solitary confinement for the detainees.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia Navarro filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Some of the hunger strikers have not been eating for more than 70 days, making this the longest hunger strike ever by Palestinians and certainly the largest.

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The Record
3:05 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Stax Bassist Duck Dunn Remembered In Memphis

Donald "Duck" Dunn onstage about 1990.
David Redfern Redferns/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:49 pm

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All Tech Considered
2:57 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Algorithms: The Ever-Growing, All-Knowing Way Of The Future

Quid's algorithm mapping software shows where discussion of higher taxes is taking place. Yellow dots represent articles that focus on taxation, while the teal dots show articles that don't.
Courtesy of Quid

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 4:24 pm

My favorite movie, Days of Heaven, is at the top of my recommendations list on Netflix. But I've never actually watched it on Netflix, so how did they know I like it?

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It's All Politics
2:38 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Romney And Obama: A Tale Of Two Commencement Speeches

President Obama delivers the commencement address Monday at Barnard College in New York.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:06 pm

As close as the general election is expected to be, virtually everything the presidential candidates do from here until November is about maximizing the turnout of voters in their respective bases without repelling independents or moderates.

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

'All About Family': Listeners' Stories On Living In Multigenerational Households

have a blog with a friend all about our grandmas!"" href="/post/all-about-family-listeners-stories-living-multigenerational-households" class="noexit lightbox">
"This is me and my grandma, May Lee, who is turning 105 in June. I live with her and my aunt so I can help take care of her. I also have a blog with a friend all about our grandmas!"
Courtesy of Kristina Kaufman

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 10:26 am

The emotional and financial costs of caregiving have been a central theme in Morning Edition's special series called "Family Matters: The Money Squeeze." It profiles three families struggling with the complexities of living in multigenerational households and facing difficult financial decisions: how to afford care for an elderly relative while paying for college and saving for retirement.

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Asia
2:08 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Australia's Poker Machines: Are They Too Popular?

Gambling machines are extremely popular in Australia, and there are concerns about the level of gambling addiction. Opinion polls show that many Australians would like to see greater regulation of gambling.
Paul Miller Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

It's a weekday night at the Welcome Stranger pub in downtown Melbourne. Tom Cummings, who used to be a regular here, shows me around the gaming room.

"This machine here, which is called Shaman's Magic, has four different jackpots that you can win. If you'd like to give it a whirl, you can see how you go," says Cummings.

The machines here take Australian $50 bills (Australian dollars are currently worth almost exactly the same as U.S. dollars). You can lose $1,200 in an hour. And a win is not always what it appears to be.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Ron Paul Will Stop Campaigning, But Will Continue Delegate Hunt

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, in February.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 9:39 am

Rep. Ron Paul, of Texas, issued a carefully worded statement today, saying his team will no longer campaign in the rest of the primary states.

Does that mean he's bowing out of the GOP primary and leaving the nomination all to Mitt Romney? Not really.

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Opinion
1:52 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Op-Ed: Euro Crisis 'Uniquely Greek'

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now, the Opinion Page. Markets around the world continue to fall. After losing ground several days in a row, the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 80 points at last glance as the political stalemate drags on in Greece. A final push is set to begin tomorrow in Athens to form a coalition government after elections that served as an angry rebuke of austerity by Greek voters. Analysts are increasingly concerned that Greece's political paralysis may lead that country to leave the eurozone and head towards default.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Calif. Governor Proposes Closing $16 Billion Deficit With Cuts, Tax Hikes

California is facing a budget shortfall of $15.7 billion. Today, Gov. Jerry Brown released a budget that closes that budget with a combination of tax hikes and deep cuts to health and welfare spending.

The AP reports:

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Shocking' Dinner With Washington

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 9:35 am

In 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited African-American educator Booker T. Washington, who had become close to the president, to dine with his family at the White House. Several other presidents had invited African-Americans to meetings at the White House, but never to a meal. And in 1901, segregation was law.

News of the dinner between a former slave and the president of the United States became a national sensation. The subject of inflammatory articles and cartoons, it shifted the national conversation around race at the time.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:18 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Jobs And College Pose Big Challenges For Young People With Autism

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 6:50 am

Times are tough for young people. Unemployment is high, and college costs are soaring.

For those who've been diagnosed with autism, the challenges of life after high school are even steeper, according to a study just published in the journal Pediatrics.

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Education
1:11 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Third Grade A Pivotal Time In Students' Lives

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 1:52 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The age of eight or nine, when kids complete third grade, represents a key turning point. Up until then, children are learning to read. Afterwards, they read to learn. Many educators believe that kids who can't read should be held back, and several states use standardized tests. Kids who don't pass are automatically held back, or retained.

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