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Hillary Clinton's increasingly dominant lead in the presidential race is solidifying many Republicans' worst 2016 fears that Donald Trump will cost the party not only the White House but also control of the Senate.

"The bottom is starting to fall out a little earlier than expected," says a top Senate GOP campaign aide who requested anonymity to speak candidly about the state of the race. "We started off with a very difficult map. No matter what, this was going to be a very difficult year."

It's a line that draws thunderous applause at Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign rallies, one that can sometimes even bring the crowd to its feet: Let's bring back America's lost manufacturing jobs.

And is there any question why? The United States has lost nearly 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2000 alone, hollowing out factory towns all over the country and leaving countless working-class Americans struggling.

In the 1500s, an Italian scientist named Giambattista della Porta made a discovery near and dear to many a frozen dessert lover's heart: By mixing salt and snow, you could lower the melting point of ice.

Della Porta used this discovery to freeze wine in a glass of salt and ice. Specifically, he took a vial of wine, added a dash of water and immersed it in a wooden bucket full of snow mixed with saltpeter, then turned the vial round and round. The saltpeter made the snow colder than it would have been otherwise, allowing the wine inside the vial to freeze.

The U.S. Department of Transportation released a statistic on Wednesday that should surprise no one who flies: In the first six months of the year, nearly 1 in every 5 flights was delayed.

Flights can be delayed for reasons ranging from bad weather to mechanical problems, but airlines know delays are a problem.

In a report on Monday, Human Rights Watch described a harrowing series of events that took place less than a mile from a U.N. base in South Sudan's capital, Juba. On July 11, the report said, dozens of men in government uniforms "ransacked and looted" a hotel compound, first killing a South Sudanese journalist and then assaulting and raping aid workers staying there.

Fu Yuanhui, a Chinese swimmer at the Rio Olympics, made headlines this week for telling the world she was on her period.

How do you move a 12,000-pound, 120-year-old lighthouse across a river? Very slowly.

For 60 years, the Port Clinton Lighthouse sat in a private marina on the Portage River, moved from its original spot on Lake Erie. One of the only remaining wooden lighthouses on the Great Lakes, the structure deteriorated over the years.

But five years ago, a group of conservationists began to restore the lighthouse. And Tuesday, it moved back across the river.

Many people lined up in this Ohio town for hours to watch the lighthouse take its place on the lakefront.

Yesterday, we looked at a new rail line being constructed in London, a massive project that’s set to be completed on time and under budget.

Today, a look at the challenges of improving and maintaining the New York City subway, operated by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

At age 48, former tech entrepreneur and author James Altucher prides himself on owning just 15 things.

It’s not that he can’t afford more. But after a series of financial failures, and hitting bottom emotionally, he realized the best way to heal was to give away everything. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Altucher living more with less.

Read Altucher’s essay “I Want to Die.”

Once people realized that opioid drugs could cause addiction and deadly overdoses, they tried to use newer forms of opioids to treat the addiction to its parent. Morphine, about 10 times the strength of opium, was used to curb opium cravings in the early 19th century. Codeine, too, was touted as a nonaddictive drug for pain relief, as was heroin.

Those attempts were doomed to failure because all opioid drugs interact with the brain in the same way. They dock to a specific neural receptor, the mu-opioid receptor, which controls the effects of pleasure, pain relief and need.

Turkey is ordering the conditional release of some 38,000 prisoners to free up space for the thousands of people arrested in the aftermath of last month's failed coup.

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag announced the order Wednesday, NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul. Peter tells our Newscast unit:

"[Bozdag] posted the news on his Twitter account: tens of thousands of inmates to be released early, none of them violent offenders and all nearing the end of their terms.

Kids are headed back to school, and this year, a couple hundred thousand K-12 students will be walking unfamiliar halls because their previous public school closed, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Over the past 15 years, between 1,000 and 2,000 public schools have shut down each year.

The "Shadow Brokers" are in the spotlight.

The mysterious group has seized the attention of the cybersecurity world with its claim to have stolen code from the Equation Group — a team of hackers who have been tied to the National Security Agency.

American Ashton Eaton may be the reigning Olympic champion and world record holder in the decathlon, but there's still one thing that makes him nervous during his two-day, 10-event competition: the pole vault.

Eaton, 28, is the heavy favorite to win the decathlon at the Rio Games. The decathlon, which ranges from sprints to the 1,500 meters, from the shot put to the high jump, is being held Wednesday and Thursday. And ever since American Jim Thorpe won the 1912 decathlon, the winner has customarily been described as the "world's greatest all-around athlete."

Michelle Scott, 38, has been arrested at least five times from 2000 to 2007 in Florida, according to court records. Most of her charges stem from stealing cars or some other type of theft. Since her last arrest, Scott has struggled to pull her life together. The mom of a 12-year old boy and an adult daughter, Scott, who is black, struggles with depression, and currently lives in a homeless shelter working less than 20 hours a week as a housekeeper. Because of her criminal history, stable jobs and housing are hard to come by.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Police visited the athletes' village in Rio Wednesday, hoping to seize the passports of Ryan Lochte and James Feigen as part of an inquiry into Lochte's report that he was the victim of a robbery — a crime that has since been called into question.

Lochte's attorney, Jeffrey M. Ostrow, tells NPR that the decorated swimmer is already back in the United States.

No one would want to throw the biggest party in the world if they were in the middle of divorce, broke and being audited.

That's pretty much the situation Brazil finds itself in right now, during the Summer Olympic Games.

President Dilma Rousseff is in the midst of being impeached. Her trial starts in a few days, after the end of the games. The country is going through a historic recession and budgets are being repeatedly slashed. And the largest corruption investigation in Latin American history has taken down politicians and captains of industry alike.

North's Korea's No. 2 diplomat in the U.K. has defected to South Korea — one of the highest-ranking officials to do so, according to South Korea.

A spokesman for South Korea's Unification Ministry announced Wednesday that London-based Thae Yong Ho had recently arrived in the country and that he and his family are now under government protection, the Yonhap News Agency reports.

It's not often in the midst of an antitrust fight that the public gets a look at the gamesmanship that's happening behind the scenes.

But thanks to the Huffington Post's Jonathan Cohn and Jeff Young, we got a glimpse at how health insurer Aetna is making its case to acquire rival Humana — and new insight into Aetna's decision announced Tuesday to pull out of Obamcare exchanges in 11 states.

It's increasingly clear that bad experiences during childhood are associated with long-lasting health effects, including higher rates of heart disease, diabetes and depression. And childhood abuse in particular has been associated with psychiatric problems and chronic diseases years down the line. But whether that translates to a higher risk of early death for abuse survivors isn't well studied.

Police in Rio de Janeiro served Patrick Joseph Hickey, the president of Ireland's Olympic Committee, with arrest and search warrants Wednesday morning, in an embarrassing development in a scandal over accusations that he was involved in the scalping of some 1,000 tickets to Summer Olympics events.

Hours after he was taken into custody, Hickey, who serves on the International Olympic Committee's 15-member executive board, stepped down from all Olympic roles, in what was called a temporary move.

In 1874, when the painter and naturalist Henry Wood Elliott was observing a small crowd of walruses on the Punuk Islands off Alaska's coast, he was preoccupied with the appearance of their pustules and the precise texture of their skins.

"The longer I looked at them the more heightened was my disgust; for they resembled distorted, mortified, shapeless masses of flesh," he wrote. Almost off-handedly, he noted their number — around 150, all male — before pondering their resemblance to "so many gnomes or demons of fairy romance."

Distilling The Story Of California Wine, One Label At A Time

19 hours ago

For the first half of the 20th century, nobody would have ever compared the wines of California's Napa Valley to the great wines of France.

"It's amazing when you think about it," says Amy Azzarito, online strategist at the University of California, Davis, library. "California wines were a joke for a long time. And they're not anymore."

Six men were abducted from an upscale restaurant in the Mexican resort town of Puerto Vallarta on Monday — including the son of imprisoned drug cartel kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, officials say.

The kidnapping was a brazen crime, one that might signal a major drug cartel rivalry, NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

"Jalisco state's attorney general confirmed that 29-year-old Jesus Alfredo Guzmán, a son of Chapo Guzmán, was one of six men abducted by armed assailants in Puerto Vallarta," Carrie says.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is shaking up his campaign staff, after a series of missteps that led to slumping poll numbers.

Trump has tapped Stephen Bannon of Breitbart News to serve as chief executive of the campaign. Pollster Kellyanne Conway was promoted to campaign manager. Paul Manafort will stay on as Trump's campaign chairman. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news.

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