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Calling members of the transnational street gang MS-13 "animals" who like to let their victims "die slowly because that way it's more painful," President Trump on Friday sought to highlight his administration's efforts to crack down on illegal immigration, reduce violent crime and secure additional congressional funding for immigration enforcement.

Republican Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma talks to NPR's Robert Siegel about why he's disappointed that the health care vote failed. His state has only one insurer available to Oklahomans on the exchange, and premiums have increased an average of 76 percent.

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The CEO of Royal Dutch Shell this week said his company is making a striking shift in its thinking: It now expects oil prices to remain low forever. The global oil glut of recent years shows no sign of diminishing. Energy demand has leveled off. And if electric vehicles take off, oil prices could come under even more downward pressure.

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As speculation continues in Washington over Attorney General Jeff Sessions' future, in his home state, Alabama, there's a raucous race for his former Senate seat. And President Trump is playing a big role in that race. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

The Food and Drug Administration is proposing sweeping changes to how it regulates cigarettes and related products, including e-cigarettes. One big change: It's planning to reduce the amount of nicotine allowed in tobacco cigarettes.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

President Trump's White House has been operating so far outside of this country's traditional ethical "norms" that it's been "a shock to the system," Walter Shaub, former director of the Office of Government Ethics, said Friday.

"We are truly in an ethics crisis, and something needs to be done about it," he said at a news conference at the National Press Club.

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

President Trump ended a week defined by White House staff turmoil when he named retired Marine Gen. John Kelly as his new chief of staff on Friday evening.

Trump made the announcement via Twitter.

"He is a Great American and a Great Leader," Trump said. "John has also done a spectacular job at Homeland Security. He has been a true star of my Administration."

Trump also tweeted his thanks to Reince Priebus, who had been his chief of staff since Inauguration Day.

In body camera footage released by police in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., an officer tells tennis star Venus Williams that she is at fault in a car crash, but that he is not going to cite her. "You just got stuck in a bad situation there," he says.

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The Senate effort to undo the Affordable Care Act failed dramatically early Friday morning, with Sen. John McCain casting a deciding "no" vote. The promise of repeal has animated the Republican Party for seven years, and the defeat was a devastating loss for the GOP and President Trump.

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Updated at 8 p.m. ET

He rose from relative state-party obscurity and reached an unlikely pinnacle as the man responsible for the agenda of the president of the United States.

Now, Reince Priebus is out of that job as White House chief of staff in the most significant shake-up of the rocky Trump presidency.

President Trump announced on Twitter on Friday that Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has been named to replace Priebus, who says he resigned Thursday.

A U.S. government venture capital fund supporting efforts to end extreme poverty will stop accepting new grant applications tonight.

Friday's announcement puts a hold on a program that provides seed funding for innovative initiatives like developing low-cost smart tractors in Nigeria and running a peer support group for pregnant women in Nepal.

Updated 9:45 p.m. ET

The vacation wasn't supposed to end this way — or end so early.

The human brain knows what it knows. And so, it appears, does a rat brain.

Rats have shown that they have the ability to monitor the strength of their own memories, researchers from Providence College reported this month in the journal Animal Cognition.

Brain scientists call this sort of ability metacognition. It's a concept that became famous in 2002, when then Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld explained to reporters:

Nawaz Sharif, who served until Friday as the 18th prime minister of Pakistan, is no stranger to his country's courts. In three tumultuous go-rounds as premier over the past 27 years, he's been embroiled repeatedly in judicial cases on charges ranging from corruption and contempt to terrorism and treason.

A New Life For Old School Board Games

14 hours ago

Gaming enthusiasts are everywhere. Kickstarter’s most funded category has long been games — especially board and card games — and hobbyists are also breathing new life into so-called “old school games.”

In the startup-savvy San Francisco Bay Area, they’re trying to take them to the next level. Sonia Paul (@sonipaul) reports for KALW.

In May 1969, Jim McCloughan was a 23-year-old private serving as an Army medic in Vietnam. During the ferocious, dayslong battle of Nui Yon Hill, he repeatedly entered the kill zone to rescue wounded soldiers, despite being wounded himself. McCloughan was wounded so badly that an officer suggested he leave the field for treatment. Instead he stayed, risking his life on nine separate occasions to rescue his comrades.

When he was 16 years old, Melvin Caballero left his life of picking coffee in Honduras in search of more opportunity in the United States. Part of the journey involved 36 hours crammed into the back of a sweltering tractor-trailer with one small hole for ventilation.

Deputy White House counsel Gregory Katsas is the leading candidate for a judgeship in one of the most important federal appeals courts in the nation, NPR has learned.

While the White House has not yet named its pick for the seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, a Katsas nomination would open the door to confirmation hearings that could plumb a series of legal controversies from the first six months of the Trump administration.

A German court sentenced a 29-year-old British hacker who confessed to committing a cyberattack last November that temporarily took down Internet access for nearly 1 million German consumers, according to news reports.

The court in the city of Cologne handed down a suspended sentence Friday of one year and eight months, Reuters reports. The news service adds that the maximum sentence was 10 years; prosecutors had sought a sentence of two years.

Paul Shanley, a Boston priest notorious for his role in the Catholic Church's sex abuse scandal, was released from prison on Friday morning.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

The Atlantic magazine, founded in 1857 as a crusading publication by an anti-slavery group, will be acquired by the widow of the man behind the iPod and whose philanthropic organization is named for one of those very abolitionists.

Laurene Powell Jobs's Emerson Collective, named for Ralph Waldo Emerson, will buy a majority stake in The Atlantic. The current owner, David Bradley, has transformed the magazine in his eighteen years there, with a greater focus on politics and a refashioning of its finances.

Charlie Gard, the British baby with a terminal illness who became subject to a high-profile legal dispute, has died in hospice care, according to multiple media reports.

The Guardian, citing Gard's parents, reports that the infant died on Friday, one day after being transferred to an unidentified hospice facility.

Charlie had an rare genetic disorder known as MMDS, which affected his brain and his muscles. He could not move his limbs or breathe on his own.

William Browder knows Vladimir Putin's Russia all too well.

Browder made a fortune in Russia, in the process uncovering, he says, incredible amounts of fraud and corruption. When he tried to report it to authorities, the government kicked him out of the country and, he alleges, tortured and killed the lawyer he was working with.

An effort to help global sexual health charities losing support under the Trump administration has reached a new milestone: $300 million in fundraising.

The Dutch government revealed the new figure on Friday. The "She Decides" initiative — the brainchild of one Dutch official — kicked off earlier this year, and announced $190 million in funding as of early March.

As the International AIDS Conference took place in Paris this week, UNAIDS issued a report with an encouraging statistic.

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