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New advances in medicine also tend to come with a hefty dose of hype. Yes, some new cancer drugs in the hot field of precision medicine have worked remarkably well for some patients. But while many patients clamor for them, they aren't currently effective for the vast majority of cancers.

All it took was one Facebook post and it seemed the whole Internet, or Twitter at least, knew what happened at The Red Hen in Lexington, Va., on Friday night.

The Facebook status update posted by a server at the small farm-to-table restaurant in the Shenandoah Valley read: "I just served Sarah huckabee sanders for a total of 2 minutes before my owner asked her to leave." The post has since been deleted.

This past Sunday, as many Americans wrapped up their Father's Day celebrations, White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller — purported architect of the administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy at the southern border — had a hankering for Mexican food.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of people gathered Saturday in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, bearing flags and seeking a glimpse of a reformist leader whose tenure is just months old. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was in the central Meskel Square to deliver a speech — but not long after he finished, a deadly blast unraveled the crowd.

An explosion narrowly missed Zimbabwe's President Emmerson Mnangagwa Saturday at a rally filled with his supporters, in what the state-owned newspaper The Zimbabwe Herald is calling an assassination attempt.

Predictions

16 hours ago

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the first thing our new American Space Force does - Alonzo Bodden?

ALONZO BODDEN: Hopefully, the first act of Space Force will be to remake "Solo" because that was just horrible.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Faith Salie.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

16 hours ago

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

Limericks

16 hours ago

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Just about 10 days ago, Katie Arrington was celebrating a hard-fought electoral win. The conservative South Carolina state lawmaker had dealt longtime incumbent Rep. Mark Sanford a surprising defeat in the state's congressional GOP primary.

Now Arrington, 47, is in the hospital facing quite another kind of fight.

A friend had been driving the U.S. House hopeful Friday night when their car was struck by a vehicle driving the wrong direction on the highway, according to her spokesperson.

The U.S. and South Korea have called off upcoming military exercises that were set to occur over the next three months, the Pentagon announced Friday evening.

According to the statement, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis made the decision to "indefinitely suspend select exercises," including the Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise, which was put on hold earlier this week, along with two Korean Marine Exchange Program training exercises.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

The fact that rural, economically disadvantaged parts of the country broke heavily for the Republican candidate in the 2016 election is well known. But Medicare data indicate that voters in areas that went for Trump weren't just hurting economically — many of them were receiving prescriptions for opioid painkillers.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now, a story about how a high school history project ended up making history - the project, by a teenager in Nebraska, helped reunite twin brothers separated at death during World War II. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sends this report from the American Cemetery in Normandy.

A Global Guide For Leery Travelers

23 hours ago

With its tropical beaches and a memorable national park, Venezuela was a popular destination for American tourists a decade ago. But years of political and economic turmoil have left its tourism industry in tatters.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

World Health Organization recognizes gaming as addictive disorder

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

Peace talks between the leaders of South Sudan's warring factions have proven so far to be unfruitful, with no agreement on the table and their June 30 deadline nearing, Carolyn Thompson reports for NPR.

A spokesman for South Sudan government said Friday "we have had enough."

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

The fear of family separation is not new for many immigrants already living in the U.S. In fact, that fear, heightened in recent weeks, has been forcing a tough decision for some families. Advocates say a growing number of American children are dropping out of Medicaid and other government programs because their parents are undocumented.

Marlene is an undocumented resident of Texas and has two children who are U.S. citizens. (NPR is not using Marlene's last name because of her immigration status.) One of her kids has some disabilities.

It's the summer driving season, when millions of Americans take road trips to the beach, big cities, national parks and beyond.

And what goes along with an increase in road trips? A hike in gas prices.

Indeed, historically summer is the time of year gas prices go up because more people are on the road, increasing demand. Oil refineries also introduce special fuel blends during the summer, which emit fewer emissions than winter blends but are more expensive to produce.

Despite the cloudy skies that have been looming over Senegal's seaside capital of Dakar the past few days, there is plenty of sunshine in the streets.

The country's national colors, yellow, green and red, can be spotted all over the city as part of growing enthusiasm over the national team's World Cup hopes. The excitement is building as the Lions of Teranga head into their second World Cup match this weekend after their 2-1 win over Poland in Moscow on Tuesday.

It’s been another busy week on social media, with users sharing photos of protests as migrant parents waited to be reunited with their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. First lady Melania Trump also caused a firestorm over a jacket she wore to visit a children’s shelter in Texas. And New Zealand’s Prime Minister gave birth to a baby girl — and Twitter is celebrating.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

More than a decade and a half after a weeks-long sniper rampage paralyzed the region around Washington, D.C., one of its two perpetrators is likely to get new sentencing hearings. An appeals court in Virginia confirmed Thursday that several of Lee Boyd Malvo's life sentences without parole must be vacated.

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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