The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Canada Stops Its Defense Of Asbestos, As Quebec's Mines Close For Good

A former Asbestos plant is seen February in Thetford Mines, Quebec. Canada has ended its refusal to allow chrysotile asbestos to be added to the U.N.'s Rotterdam Convention on hazardous materials.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:45 am

Canada's leaders have ended their country's longstanding resistance to asbestos being called a dangerous material under United Nations guidelines, a decision that reflects a shift in the leadership of Quebec province, home of Canada's asbestos industry.

Quebec's incoming premier, Pauline Marois, promised late in her campaign that she would shut down the region's asbestos mines for good. She says that she will use money that would have gone to restart the mines to diversify the local economy.

As Dan Karpenchuk reports for NPR's Newscast unit:

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KC Currents
2:22 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Mo. Farmers Recovering From Flood Hit With Drought, Nerd Nite KC: Erin Dahl Talks Silk Worms

After the Birds Point Levee breach last year, water coursed through farmland, leaving debris and destruction in it wake.
Samantha Powers Harvest Public Media
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Shots - Health Blog
2:13 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Where There's 'Sexting, 'There May Be Sex

When texts become "sexts."
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 2:35 pm

How many teens are sending sexual photos or texts by phone? And what else are they doing?

Researchers surveyed nearly 2,000 high schoolers in Los Angeles to find out. Among kids who had cellphones or access to them (and that cover almost all of them), about 15 percent reported "sexting."

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KC Currents
2:11 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Google’s Fiberhood Rally Results Are In, Now What?

The Google Fiber rabbit.
Google

The deadline to pre-register for Google Fiber, what Google is calling their new super-fast internet service, came to a close September 9th.

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Books
1:43 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

How Obama, Roberts Interpret Laws In 'The Oath'

Barack Obama is sworn in as the 44th president of the United States on Jan. 20, 2009, in Washington.
Tim Sloan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 11:25 am

During his 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama ran on the platform of "change we can believe in" — but he has a different approach to the Supreme Court's interpretation of constitutional law.

"Obama is a great believer in stability — in the absence of change — when it comes to the work of the Supreme Court," Jeffrey Toobin, author and senior legal analyst for CNN, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "He is the one trying to hold onto the older decisions, and [Chief Justice John] Roberts is the one who wants to move the court in a dramatically new direction."

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

What 'The Influencing Machine' Teaches College Kids

W.W. Norton & Co.

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 10:56 am

Several colleges and universities have adopted a common read program, in which first year students read the same book during the summer, then discuss it when they get to campus.

NPR'S Neal Conan talks with Brooke Gladstone, co-host of On The Media, about her book, The Influencing Machine, a graphic novel that tries to decipher the rapidly changing media business and the ways people interact with it.


Interview Highlights

On why her book works as a freshman read

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It's All Politics
1:38 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Football And (Conservative) Politics Do Mix For Some NFL Fans

Rowdy Smith, who brought his sons to the St. Louis Rams game on Sunday, said that President Obama's "not a leader" and is hurting the energy industry. He's shown here walking in front of the Americans for Prosperity campaign bus.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 2:18 pm

There's nothing like a ready-made crowd to help a group get its message out. That's why a conservative political organization set up shop Sunday outside the St. Louis Rams-Washington Redskins NFL football game.

Why mix politics and football?

"People are here," explained Patrick Werner, Missouri state director for Americans for Prosperity.

Football fans are used to encountering promotional tents for sports-talk radio stations and brands of beer and mixed nuts on their way to the game. Not so many of them expect to discuss politics as part of the pregame festivities.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Exploring 'Hidden' Jobs, From Coal Miner To Cowboy

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 11:31 am

Jeanne Marie Laskas first came across "hidden America" 500 feet underground, traveling with miners through a narrow, dark coal mine in Ohio. There, she realized how dependent Americans are on the work of miners, yet most people know very little about their world or their work.

In a new book, Laskas chronicles her weeks spent following the lives of those whose jobs are nearly invisible to most of us, from air traffic controllers and truck drivers, to migrant workers and professional football cheerleaders.

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Opinion
12:58 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Op-Ed: It's Time To Fix Our Broken Password System

Many of us use the same password in multiple locations, which can leave us vulnerable to hacking.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:09 pm

You need one password to log in to your computer, another for your smartphone, one for your email, for your bank, your music collection, your Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn accounts. Experts tell us those passwords should be long, contain numbers, letters and symbols and not include personal information like birth dates. Oh, and you're supposed to remember them all, too.

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World
12:58 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Politics, Religion And Power Behind Protests

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 10:30 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. In Beirut today, American diplomats burned classified documents as a security precaution while Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah made a rare public appearance to demand suppression of an Internet video that's triggered sometimes deadly protests since last week.

The world should know our anger will not be a passing outburst, Nasrallah told tens of thousands of his supporters. The world did not understand the level of insult to God's prophet.

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