Food And Drink

Everyone's A Critic: Yelp Reviews

May 23, 2012
Victor1558 / Flickr

There's that old saying everyone’s a critic, and at no point in human history does this ring more true. In our wired world, we love to discover new places to whine and dine.

Food Critics: Dining Al Fresco

May 17, 2012

Coming up on Central Standard Friday, host Charles Ferruzza and the Food Critics share their favorite places for dining outdoors, including a patio in Parkville that feels like a tree house and a deck overlooking Lake Lotawana.

Laura Ziegler

The U.S. created its food aid program more than 50 years ago in part to alleviate surpluses in agricultural commodities. Surpluses aren't a persistent issue today, but world hunger has become a more acute problem.

So Long, Boulevard Twist-Off Caps

Apr 26, 2012
Herkie / Flickr--CC

Kansas City's Boulevard Brewery is no longer making beers with twist-off caps, reports Brad at the KC Beer Blog. Now all the beers produced by the Midwest’s largest specialty brewer will be capped with more effective, less hand-friendly pry-off tops.

A British winemaker has finally been given official approval to release a limited-edition wine made in collaboration with Malbec grape growers in Argentina, on one condition: It can't sell the wine, or label it a Malbec. Actually, it can't even call it wine at all.

The Chapel Down winery's only option for getting rid of its wine is to give it away as a sample, calling it a "fruit-derived alcoholic beverage from produce sourced outside the EU."

Spring-Inspired Recipes

Apr 18, 2012
Beth Bader

With each season comes exciting seasonal produce – but now what? On today's Central Standard, how to give your go-to recipes a spring makeover with seasonal ingredients including peas, garlic scapes & herbs, to name a few.

Could knocking back a few beers influence a person’s political views?

Food stamps have long been a favorite whipping boy of politicians looking to beat up on government spending. But the massive food-assistance program does help keep people out of poverty, according to new research.

Food stamp benefits led to a decline of 4.4 percent in poverty from 2000 to 2009, according to a new report from the USDA's Economic Research Service.

Want extra salt with that fast-food meal? Then buy it in the United States, where chicken dishes, pizzas, and even salads are loaded with far more salt than in Europe and Australia, according to new research.

The McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in the United States have more than twice as much salt as their sister nuggets in the United Kingdom. That's 1.6 grams of salt for every 100 grams of American nugget, compared with 0.6 grams in the U.K.

Not long after the start of the school year, Monique Sanders, a teacher at Nathan Hale Elementary School in Manchester, Conn., realized many of her students were going to bed hungry.

"It was very bad. I had parents calling me several times a week, asking did I know of any other way that they could get food because they had already gone to a food pantry," Sanders says. "The food pantry only allows you to go twice per month, so if you are running low on your food stamps or you didn't get what you needed and you're not able to feed your family, that's very stressful."

Food Critics: Finding A Great Sandwich

Apr 5, 2012
Ulterior Epicure / Flickr

Coming up on this Friday's Walt Bodine Show, a conversation about the greatest sandwiches in town – from Reubens and Clubs, to Meatball Subs and Tortas.

As we've reported, fish fraud – labeling a less-desirable species as a more desirable one – is more widespread than you'd think. Olive oil, too, isn't always what it seems. And honey from Asia is fraught with suspicion.

Food Critics: The Service Show

Mar 15, 2012

There's more to going out to eat than what's on your plate. On this Friday's Walt Bodine Show, we turn the tables for a look at area dining from the service perspective.

Rush Limbaugh To Enter Hall of Famous Missourians, Nuclear Officials To Hold Meeting Near Wolf Creek Plant & more: A daily digest of headlines from KCUR.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

Some vegetarian food is getting a makeover. It's being made to look, feel and taste more like meat.

Food Critics: Takeout

Feb 24, 2012
pirate johnny / flickr

On some nights, there’s no greater luxury than ordering a meal to go. In this edition of the Walt Bodine Show, the Food Critics share their favorite take out spots – from Mediterranean kebabs, to Chinese noodles.

The Psychology Of Eating

Feb 20, 2012
celeste343 / flickr

On this Central Standard, we explore what happens to our brains on food. Have you ever wondered what goes on when you lie in bed, thinking about that late night snack?

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

Pick up your favorite packaged food and read the ingredient list. If you stumbled over any of the words or a color jumped out at you, you might be looking at what’s known as a food additive.

A daily digest of headlines from KCUR.

Christi Nielsen

NOTE: Audio is unavailable from today's show. We apologize for the technical difficulties.

Consumers are getting smarter about the food they eat.  We know to check labels for the levels of sodium and saturated fat, and that "high fructose corn syrup" is still sugar.   Most of us hit a wall though when it comes to ingredients such as malodextrin, flavonoids and silicon dioxide.  What are these ingredients found in the  foods we eat and drink

Healthy Food As Love

Feb 7, 2012
Vegan Fest Catering / Flickr

If you have a special someone in your life and you want to show them how you feel... is a box of chocolates really the best you can do? What about the fat? The calories? The guilt? On the second half of today’s Central Standard, food writer Beth Bader will join us with a new way to tell your special someone you care- by making them something healthy to enjoy.

The Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services recently cut off hundreds – possibly thousands – of immigrant families from receiving food stamps.

Food Critics: Your Nontraditional Valentine

Feb 3, 2012
Beth Berst-Gregory / Flickr

Forget the lobster and candlelight... how about spicy ceviche and mango smoothies? On this Walt Bodine Show, the Food Critics share ideas for taking your Valentine out for a nontraditional evening.

Farmanac / Flickr.com

Throwing food scraps to hogs and other farm animals is an age-old practice. As food production has become more industrialized, food factories have found ways to continue to recycle massive amounts of would-be food waste.

A Kansas social services official today defended a policy that has effectively made hundreds of children ineligible for food stamps. The Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services recently changed how household income is calculated for the program.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

Walk into your neighborhood grocery store looking for healthy food and you might get lost amid a sea of confusing labels and dubious claims. Consumers looking to eat right may get the wrong ideas.

HyVee, like many grocery chains, is trying to part that sea and simplify nutrition for consumers who may not want to read the fine print on their food.

At HyVee stores, you’ll find NuVal. It’s a scoring system on a scale of 1 to 100. The healthier the food, the higher the score.

flickr/Martin Cathrae

Eating healthy doesn't have to be a chore.

On Friday's Walt Bodine Show, join co-host Charles Ferruzza and the Food Critics for a conversation about finding tasty, yet nutritious food options in Kansas City.

Vegetarianism In KC / Pity The Billionaire

Jan 12, 2012

How difficult is it to be a vegetarian in Kansas City? Then later... Even Mr. T pities a fool, but why pity a billionaire?

If you've been to a Hy-Vee grocery store recently, chances are you've seen some numbers right next to the price of an item of food.

It's a "NuVal" - a nutritional value placed on each and every food product. 

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The Food and Drug Administration is clamping down on the off-label use of certain antibiotics in food-producing animals. 

In an order published today, the FDA said meat producers can no longer use the class known as cephalosporins in ways not approved by the agency. While curbing use won’t change much in the meat industry, the order signals a bigger concern about antibiotics regulation, some farmers say.

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