Film

Submarine Deluxe

Just when you thought it was safe to go out and enjoy the warm weather this weekend, the temperatures are set to take a dive. So ward off the chill  at a neighborhood theater showing one of these films recommended by the Up to Date film critics.

Cynthia Haines

Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, Not Rated

Embrace of the Serpent, Not Rated

Lady in the Van, PG-13

Steve Walker

Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict

Up To Date's film critics review the latest independent, foreign and documentary movies showing in area theaters.

Here's a list of films discussed during the show:

  • Hitchcock/Truffaut
  • Rolling Papers
  • Embrace of the Serpent
  • The Boy and The Beast
  • The Witch
  • Triple 9
  • Lady in the Van
Rooks Nest Entertainment

Awards season is over, which means there's a fresh crop of independent, foreign and documentary films for you to take in this weekend.  With pollen counts so high, who wants to go outside anyway? Whether you're looking for something creepy or something sweet, Up To Date's film critics have a suggestion for you. 

Cynthia Haines

Hitchcock/Truffaut, PG-13

What better place to shelter from those March winds? Your local movie theater, of course! Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have suggestions that'll entertain and help keep your hair more manageable.

Cynthia Haines

Mustang, PG-13

  • After innocently playing with boys on a beach, five orphan girls, their scandalized guardians confine them and arrange forced marriages.

45 Years, R

Remembering Fred Andrews, who helped build Kansas City's filmmaking community.

Guests:

Feeling the need to cram before the Oscars are presented this Sunday? Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics suggest a few nominees to get you caught up.

Cynthia Haines

Mustang, PG-13

  • After innocently playing with boys on a beach, five orphan girls, their scandalized guardians confine them and arrange forced marriages.

45 Years, R

https://www.facebook.com/PrettyInPinkMovie

Pretty in Pink, the classic John Hughes film, turns 30 this Sunday. We talk about class differences, high school culture, the mystique of the record store ... and prom (of course).

Guests:

Al Pitzner

Kansas City Mayor Sly James established Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, as "Fred Andrews Day" to honor Andrews's 20-year commitment to the city's film community. 

But as friends gathered to celebrate, Fred Andrews was not there. He died on Wednesday after a six-year struggle with cancer.

In 1996, Andrews had an idea for a film festival. And the following year, he made it happen on the campus of University of Missouri-Kansas City — in collaboration with other area universities, the Independent Filmmakers Coalition, and the Film Society of Kansas City — on a shoestring budget. 

Does the warm weather have you in a festive mood? Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas to celebrate with some current cinema offerings.

Cynthia Haines

Room, R

  • A young woman and her son are imprisoned in a shed.

Spotlight, R

  • Reporters working for the Boston Globe uncover evidence of the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal.

Rolling Papers, not rated (showing at Liberty Hall)

cooltagged.com

A proposal for tax incentives to bring production of films, television series episodes and major TV commercials to Kansas City cleared a City Council committee Wednesday.

The details of the plan have been in the making for several months at the Film and Media Office of the city's Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Development chair Scott Taylor told the Finance Committee that Kansas City is losing talent and production contracts to cities that offer the incentives. A particularly frustrating case, he said was losing a movie set in Kansas City to Atlanta.

Bob Mahoney / Courtesy Warner Brothers

A proposal that would give rebates to film and television companies for working in Kansas City, Missouri goes to a City Council committee for consideration on Wednesday.

Kat Shiffler / Center for Rural Affairs

On a Monday night, Main Street in Lyons, Nebraska, is closed — for a movie, according to signs on the barricades. A crowd has gathered on the brick pavement. Suddenly, what appears to be an empty storefront begins to move. People watch with anticipation as the facade leans forward, lowering toward the street.

After the façade comes down, a stand of bleacher seats slides forward from the empty building, creating outdoor seating for 80 people. Lyons’ Storefront Theater has become a reality. The crowd claps and cheers.

Cuddle up with your sweetheart, a box of chocolate and a good film this Valentine's Day weekend. Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas to fill your screen.

Cynthia Haines

Son of Saul, R

  • It has been nominated for best foreign film, and I would maybe put money on it (winning). This is (the director's) first feature film, which is absolutely incredible to realize. 

45 Years, R

If your weekend isn't consumed with conversation of the gridiron, Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have some suggestions to make your weekend entertainment a touchdown.

Cynthia Haines

45 Years, R

  • Approaching their 45th anniversary, a couple confronts a secret from their past.

The Animated and Live Action Short Films nominated for Oscars

Spotlight, R

We're walking on sunshine with a warmer weekend ahead, but if you're not feeling outdoorsy, Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas to light your fire.

Cynthia Haines

The Animated, Live Action and Documentary Short Films nominated for Oscars

Theeb, not rated

  • During World War I, a Bedouin boy guides a British officer on a perilous journey across the desert

Spotlight, R

Meet Sonia Warshawski, a local Holocaust survivor and tailor. Her family tells her story in a documentary-in-progress called Big Sonia. Selected scenes will be screened at the Jewish Film Festival this Sunday.

Guest:

  • Sonia Warshawski

Brrr, it's cold outside. Let's warm up with a box of popcorn and a great film. Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have some suggestions that will fire up your imagination.

Cynthia Haines

Theeb, not rated

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

Spotlight, R

Energized by the Oscar nominations this week? Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have some suggestions to shape your weekend cinematic experience.

Cynthia Haines

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

Room, R

  • A young woman and her son are imprisoned in a shed. 

Spotlight, R

Need to relax after the shock of being back at work after the holidays? Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have just the thing this weekend.

Cynthia Haines

Spotlight, R

  • Reporters working for the Boston Globe uncover evidence of the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal. 

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

The Danish Girl, R

Steve Kraske talks with University of Kansas film professor John Tibbetts about his new book, Those Who Made It: Speaking with the Legends of Hollywood. A collection of interviews with Hollywood stars and directors spanning more than three decades, the book includes conversations with Spielberg, Altman, Roger Ebert, Michael Moore, and John Houseman.

The holiday weekend means plenty of time to catch a film . . . or two! If you're undecided which to see, here's some suggestions from one of Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics.

Cynthia Haines

Spotlight, R

  • Reporters working for the Boston Globe uncover evidence of the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal.

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

Carol, R

When Anthony Ladesich found his father's youthful correspondence with an old Navy friend on a stack of reel-to-reel tapes, he also found so much more: a portal into Kansas City's jazz history, material for his films, and a way of keeping his dad with him a little longer.

This is an encore edition of Central Standard.

Guest:

  • Anthony Ladesich, filmmaker, Be It Ever So Humble, There Is No Place and Studio A

Whether you're anticipating the arrival of St. Nick or just enjoying a few days off from work, Up to Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few ideas about how to spend your vacation. 

Cynthia Haines

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

Spotlight, R

Courtesy Photo / Bruce Branit

Kansas City visual effects artist Bruce Branit and his former partner, Jeremy Hunt, are getting credit for making the first viral online video.

This according to no less a pop culture authority than Bravo TV, which is scheduled to air a segment about Branit and Hunt's video Wednesday on "Then and Now with Andy Cohen."

In 2000, Branit and Hunt made a three-minute video in which a computer-generated DC 10 lands on a California freeway. They posted it on what was a still-novel Internet:

Independent Lens

Last-minute preparations for the holidays can be exhausting. Take a break this weekend and go see an indie or documentary film. Up To Date's  film critics share their recommendations:

Cynthia Haines

Spotlight, R

  • Reporters working for the Boston Globe uncover evidence of the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal.

Brooklyn, PG-13

  • An young Irish immigrant is torn between her new home in Brooklyn and her life back in Ireland.

Room, R

Pages