World War I

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For centuries, refugees from all over the world have taken to the seas to escape violence and persecution in their homelands. Today, the author of a children's book published this year recounts just a few of their stories. Then, we speak to the director and producer of a new film about Gertrude Bell, who's been called the most powerful woman in the British Empire during World War I.

Michael St Maur Sheil

The National World War I Museum and Memorial plans several events, along with free admission for veterans and active-duty military personnel, to celebrate Monday's national holiday recognizing the men and women who've died in service to the U.S. military. 

"For a lot of families, it's really a significant moment to honor those who have served and especially those whose lives were lost," says Matthew Naylor, the museum's president and CEO.

Robert Drózd / Wikimedia Commons

John Scofield continues to make strides in the music world. His latest album, Country For Old Men, won the 2016 Grammy for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. Today, the renowned guitarist recalls playing with the likes of Miles Davis and Charles Mingus.

Eric Williams / Kansas City Symphony

Many composers have set the Roman Catholic Mass for the Dead to music. Mozart, Berlioz, Brahms and Verdi famously come to mind. Their compositions are considered masterpieces.

But Benjamin Britten’s genius was to juxtapose the austere and solemn Latin of the Requiem liturgy with the visceral and searing poetry of Wilfred Owen, who served in the British Army during World War I and died in France just days before the Armistice was signed.

Protagonist Pictures

What better way to spend a dreary weekend than taking in a few good movies at your local independent theater? If you have a hard time making up your mind, let Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics help out with their latest recommendations. They'll ensure your hair stays dry, but maybe not your eyes.

Steve Walker

Graduation, R

www.tommyshonour.com

Steve Walker

Cézanne et Moi​, R

  • Director Daniele Thompson's sumptuous account of the lifelong bromance between artist Paul Cezanne and writer Emile Zola adroitly captures the self-doubt and self-importance that shaped their artistic temperaments.

David Lynch: The Art Life, Not Rated

Kyle Espeleta / The Orchard

After your Easter plans for this weekend are done, gather the extended family together for some movie-binging. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have recommendations for the whole clan — even that one weird cousin. (You know who we're talking about!) Pro tip: Use the spoils from the Easter egg hunt to save yourself some cash on candy at the theater.

Steve Walker

Tommy's Honour, PG

Toronto International Film Festival

With the Kansas City FilmFest going on this weekend, there's no shortage of great cinema to take in (not to mention the New York Dog Film Festival and Pooch Party). For those of us not lucky enough to get tickets to that event, though, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few recommendations that can fill the festival void.

Charvex / Wikimedia Commons

As the centennial of the United States' entry into the First World War approaches, eyes across the globe are on Kansas City, Missouri. 

Today, we learn how the National World War I Museum and Memorial is commemorating the occasion, and who you can expect to see at the event.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

More than 3,000 people are expected to attend a centennial commemoration of the United States’ entry into World War I in Kansas City on Thursday.

COURTESY OF NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL

When does information become propaganda? We look back at posters from World War I, currently on display at Kansas City's World War I Museum, and draw connections to the memes of today.

Guests:

Manitoba Provincial Archives - CC

Do moderates even exist in today's bifurcated political landscape? Today, we examine the ideals of centrism and learn about some of history's notable moderates. Then, we celebrate National Winnie the Pooh Day by remembering the morale-boosting bear of World War I who inspired the world-famous cartoon character.

U.S. Library of Congress

President-elect Trump's first formal news conference lasted into today's Up To Date broadcast, so the show is shorter than usual. 

courtesy: National World War I Museum and Memorial

Weeks after the end of World War I in 1918, Kansas Citians started fundraising for a memorial. A community fund drive raised more than $2.5 million, and Liberty Memorial opened on Nov. 11, 1926. In 2006, the National World War I Museum, a $102 million project "dedicated to remembering, interpreting and understanding the Great War" opened to the public

Men In Uniform

Mar 28, 2016

According to Pellom McDaniels, when African-Americans served in World War I donning uniforms, the experience empowered them, not just as Americans but as men. On the homefront, they relived that dignity in their baseball careers. 

Guest:

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

Florence Hemphill grew up in a small town in Kansas, and saw the horrors of World War I up close when she served as a nurse in France. She wrote more than a hundred letters, sharing her experiences with family members. 

Singer-songwriter Joe Crookston recently teamed up with the National World War I Museum and Memorial to tell her story – through art and music — at the Folk Alliance International Conference in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Nurse, Please

Jan 4, 2016

The history of nursing started on the battlefield. The profession that emerged is still with us, but in a totally transformed medical landscape. Using an exhibit at the World War I Museum as a jumping off point, this discussion explores how the origins of nursing have shaped both the realities and misconceptions of the field today. 

Guests:

Video Gurus: World War I

Aug 28, 2015

Whether you want to view World War I from the trenches, explore the war's Christmas truce or cruise the skies, our Video Gurus have something to feed your historical need. Check out what they had to say on this edition of Up to Date.

All Quiet on the Western Front, unrated (before current ratings)

In May 1915, a German U-boat sunk one of the world's greatest ocean liners, the Lusitania. Erik Larson's new book, Dead Wake: the Last Crossing of the Lusitania, maps the tale known to many as the event that launched America into the Great War. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Erik Larson about his research process, the captains behind the ships involved, and the mystery of Room 40.

Guest:

Laura Spencer / KCUR

In 1914, at the outbreak of World War I, many artists put their art-making on hold, leaving their studios for the battlefield. Some in the United States waited for years for their country to enter the conflict, and others forged a new path in neutral Switzerland. It was a time of radical approaches in music, visual arts and literature. And now, local arts organizations are marking the centennial of the Great War. 

Music reflects change

National World War I Museum

For many families in America during World War I, newspaper reports were their only connection with loved ones serving in the trenches. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a journalism historian and an archivist from the World War I museum about the life of journalists reporting from the front lines during the Great War.

Western Newspaper Union / NARA/Wikimedia Commons

They served with distinction in World War I but the Buffalo Soldiers are not always remembered for their contributions during the Great War.

On Monday's Up to Date, we look at these regiments of African-American soldiers, their heroism and the racism they faced. 

Guest:

In the wake of swirling fears about the spread of Ebola as well as Kansas cases of pertussis and measles, we look back on a pandemic that hit home for Kansas City: the Influenza pandemic of 1918. The death rate in Kansas City outpaced that in other places, and some say the city's politics and public health infrastructure were largely to blame.

Stubby: The Hero Dog of World War One

Sep 30, 2014

In World War I, he served alongside American forces in 17 battles. He had a unique talent for locating wounded soldiers, and he often alerted his unit to incoming gas attacks. This unlikely hero was Sergeant Stubby a stray stump-tailed terrier mutt who became a national hero.

Random House

Of the 4.7 million Americans who took part in World War I, over 116,000 of them died. Many were given a final resting place in American military cemeteries in Europe. After the Great War a program was begun to give Gold Star mothers and widows (those whose son or husband had served during the conflict) the opportunity to cross the Atlantic to visit their loved one's grave.

WWI: Changing The Dynamics Of Espionage

Aug 20, 2014
Archives New Zealand / Flickr-CC

World War I brought a new kind of warfare to the battlefield in many ways. The world of espionage got a facelift, especially in America, with aerial photography, code breaking and more.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with a former intelligence analyst about these strategies and how they changed the way spies work.

Guest:

When World War I broke out in Europe a century ago, more than one in 10 Missourians was German-American. Host Monroe Dodd is joined by Petra DeWitt, author of a book about the struggles that Missouri's German population faced during the war.

Guest:

  • Petra DeWitt, Assistant Teaching Professor at Missouri S&T and author of Degrees of Allegiance: Harassment and Loyalty in Missouri's German-American Community during World War I.

A century ago, America got hooked on speed. On the ground, speed meant motor cars and in the air, it meant planes. All that speed was delivered by the internal combustion engine, and no one represented the new world of motor speed better than Eddie Rickenbacker. He was not only a champion race-car driver, but also the greatest of World War I flying aces.

Whoever Credit Goes To / Flickr--CC

Everyone is familiar with the National World War I Monument in Kansas City, but there are others.

On Monday, we'll hear the stories behind some of the most prominent WWI monuments and memorials in Kansas City. James J. Heiman the author of Voices In the Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials joins us.

Guest:

James J. Heiman is the author of Voices In Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials.

The U.S. National Archives / Flickr / Creative Commons

On today's Central Standard, culinary historian Andrea Broomfield joins us to discuss the importance of food during the first World War.

Broomfield explains what the food industry was like during that time at War Fare: Chow Challenge on April 30. Chefs from area restaurants will compete in an Iron Chef-style event using food available during World War I. 

 Guest:

Pages