women

Courtesy of Arionne Yvette Williams

 When Arionne Yvette Williams first heard “Formation,” the lead single of Beyoncé’s album, Lemonade, one of the lyrics inspired her to start a Bible study group for women.

“I just love the song; it just resonated with me as soon as I heard it,” Williams told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Corpus Christi Caller-Times-photo from Associated Press

Inspired by a one-woman play about Marilyn Monroe at The Fishtank Theater, we explore the phenomenon of female celebrity in the United States, then and now.

Guests:

In 1967, a young woman runner looked to make the Boston Marathon her first marathon. She signed up using her first two initials and her surname. That year, Kathrine Switzer became the first registered female runner of the Boston Marathon, an event that changed the course of her life.

University of Texas Press

Mary J. Blige has been called the Queen of Hip-Hop Soul, but what fans love most isn't her status as pop culture royalty, but her vulnerability and honesty, especially with her own struggles. What is it about this artist that accounts for her staying power, since 1992?

Guests:

Low-wage workers nationwide are continuing their fight to raise the minimum wage and have a voice in the workplace. On this edition of Up To Date, we talk about the important role women play in the labor movement, back in the 60s and today. 

Guests:

Broad City is about the friendship between two twenty-something women scraping by in New York City. In light of the Season 3 premiere in February, we ask: Are Abbi and Ilana feminist heroes or depraved slackers ... or both? (Or neither?)

We delve into Abbi and Ilana's world with a comedian, two young feminists and a TV critic. Plus, an interview with Mike Perry, a KC native who animates the opening title sequences for the show.

Guests:

The U.S. Secretary of Defense recently announced that as of January 2016, all gender-based restrictions on military service will be lifted. Despite this change, research by the Women's Foundation of Kansas City in conjunction with the University of Kansas and the Army Research Institute shows that females still face barriers within the military.

Guests:

Cody Newill / KCUR

Gov. Jay Nixon signed an executive order in Kansas City Friday promoting best practices to help end Missouri's gender pay gap.

Nixon signed the order at the Women's Foundation's annual luncheon at the Sheraton Hotel. The event drew nearly 1,600 people who came to see Nixon, Kansas City Mayor Sly James and Huffington Post co-founder Arianna Huffington speak, among others.

Has America created a culture of sexual violence? We talk about how this country’s social norms sanction rape and the role that men have in solving this serious issue.

Guests:

Lou Eisenbrandt / Courtesy Photo

When 21 year-old Louise Eisenbrandt signed up for the U.S. Army in May 1967, she had no idea what she had gotten herself into.

Eisenbrandt, who now lives in Kansas City, went from nursing school in Alton, Illinois, to South Vietnam in the middle of one of the most dangerous wars in U.S. history — for adventure's sake.

“I saw the Army as my way of seeing the world. I got more than I bargained for,” Eisenbrandt told host Steve Kraske on Up To Date.

The Equal Rights Amendment has one of the longest sagas in U.S. Congressional history. Passed in 1972 but never ratified, advocates continue to pursue strategies for its enactment.

Guest:

Jessica Neuwirth is the founder of the ERA Coalition, which has over 50 member organizations. She is the author of Equal Means Equal: Why the Time for an Equal Rights Amendment Is Now.

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill has battled through a political world dominated by men to get where she is today. She talks about that journey in her memoir, Plenty Ladylike.

Senator McCaskill will speak at 2 p.m. Sunday, August 16 at Unity Temple on the Plaza. For admission information, visit www.rainydaybooks.com.

Courtesy Photo / KC STEM Alliance

The White House has made it a point to urge girls to get involved in math, science and engineering.

In 2013, President Obama said, "We’ve got half the population that is way underrepresented in those fields and that means that we’ve got a whole bunch of talent … not being encouraged the way they need to.” 

Despite that, KC STEM Alliance director Laura Loyacono says that females are actually a shrinking percentage of the computer science workforce.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Audio Pending...

Democrat Katheryn Shields, who will take her seat on Kansas City Council on Aug. 1 after a close election win, didn't grow up dreaming of political campaigns, though the Parkville farm where she grew up as an only girl with four older brothers did teach her to be "a bit of a scrapper." 

Women make up almost half of the workforce in the United States. Even so, the higher you look on the corporate ladder the fewer women you'll find.  On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with a journalist and producer who continually explores how gender is perceived in the workplace. 

Guest:

Courtesy Photo / Paula Rose

Gender representation at Wikipedia is well-documented. Studies conducted by the Wikimedia Foundation (which serves as Wikipedia’s support structure) conclude that less than 15 percent of the popular online encyclopedia’s contributors are female.

According to Siko Bouterse, director of community resources at the Wikimedia Foundation, diversity among editors is vitally important to Wikipedia’s vision.

“Our vision for Wikipedia is ‘the sum of all human knowledge,’” she says. “We need everyone to contribute to that. The encyclopedia is incomplete without that.”

The lack of female editors has significant repercussions on the encyclopedia’s content. Pages on women’s health, women’s issues, and famous women artists tend to be mere paragraphs long, or as Wikipedians say, “stubs,” if they even exist at all.

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. Research by the Wikimedia Foundation determined that less than 15% of its contributors identify as female, which creates a great disparity in the popular online encyclopedia's content. We discuss what organizations in Kansas City and around the world are doing to fix this problem.

Guests:

Eleanor Klibanoff / KCUR

If I asked you to imagine the next great tech mind, you might picture a 20-something man in Silicon Valley. But the 20 girls at Coding and Cupcakes at the Sprint Accelerator last Saturday don't have time for gender stereotypes. They've got a website to design. 

Like 8-year-old Kyanne Carlgren, who says she "just maked an account" — her first e-mail account.

The Women's Foundation of Greater Kansas City

In a country where almost 51 percent of the population is female, positions of leadership in politics, education and business are largely dominated by men. On this edition of Up To Date, we discuss why women lag in leadership positions and how to reverse the trend.

Guests: 

  Violence against women always has a profound effect, even on the men who witness it. V-men is a workshop where men examine abuse against women through the lens of their own experiences.

Guest:

  • Rodney Smith is the associate director of Student Support Services at UMKC.

EVENT INFO: The V-Men workshop will take place Wednesday, Feb 18 at 5 p.m. at UMKC Women's Center, 105 Haag Hall (5120 Rockhill Road).

Creative Commons, Wikimedia

Her children's books shaped ideas about the Midwestern experience for multiple generations worldwide. She's been gone more than sixty years, but her influence remains strong; even now, fans and scholars attend a yearly Laurapalooza festival in her honor. Her autobiography has just recently been published, but good luck finding a copy. The first print run has sold out and the second will not even fill existing orders.

    

Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric and Christiane Amanpour shattered the glass ceiling when they broke into the boys' club of TV news. These gifted journalists transformed the way Americans view the news.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with the author of a new book that examines the struggles these women faced on their path to the anchor chair. We look at the individual strengths that shaped them and pushed them to success, and what their legacies will be. 

Guest:

julie / Flickr, Creative Commons

You could be forgiven if you happen to believe that Mother's Day is a holiday invented by florists, candy stores and greeting card companies. In point of fact, however, this holiday has a hard-won, grassroots history that puts today's celebrations in context.

On Central Standard, a historian introduced us to three women who lobbied for a mother's day of sorts: the first out of a desire for peace, the second to decrease infant mortality through education, and the third in service of her own professional yearnings.

wonderwomendoc.com

When you talk about heroes of the cape-and-tights variety, it’s not just a boy’s club. Just look at the comic book powers of Wonder Woman or the X-Men’s Storm, or even live-action heroes like Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Xena.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with the director of a new documentary about female superheroes and how they reflect and affect society’s ideas about women.

Guests:

(Peggy Lowe/KCUR)

  It was a chant from a different era.

“ERA now! ERA now! ERA now!”

As much as it sounded straight out of the past, the rallying cry was used Tuesday as a coalition of women’s groups marched to the Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City on Equal Pay Day, the day marking how far into a new year it takes a woman to earn what a man took home last year.

Kauffman Foundation

A recent Forbes.com article headline touted “11 Reasons 2014 Will Be A Breakout Year For Women Entrepreneurs.” 

And, indeed, the statistics are looking good.

The business world is infamous for its “glass ceiling.” And it’s true that being a woman in a man’s world can make it more difficult to succeed.

In the second part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with the president the Kansas City Sports Commission and the publisher of The Kansas City Star — both women — about how they reached the top and what advice they have for other women.

Guests:

An Unconventional First Lady

Jun 4, 2013
firstladies.org

Thomas Jefferson's eldest and favorite daughter, Martha Jefferson Randolph, would often assume the role of First Lady after her mother died.

Jessica Hills

In 1889, it wasn't a woman's world, but that didn't dampen the enthusiasm of reporters Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland when they embarked on a journey to beat Phileas Fogg's fictional travels.

Although they’ve just recently been allowed in combat, women in the military have long faced a host of challenges, both on the battlefield and at home.

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