voter ID

Barbara Shelly / KCUR 89.3

A coalition of social justice groups is pushing for the Unified Government of Wyandotte County to become the first government in the Kansas City area to issue municipal identification cards to residents.

The coalition, which includes the ACLU of Kansas, says as many as one in five Wyandotte County residents belong to demographic groups that are likely to have trouble obtaining a government-issued photo ID. 

A Kansas City woman who says she intentionally went to the polls Tuesday morning without a photo ID, says she was first told erroneously by poll workers that she could not vote. When she insisted she could still cast a provisional ballot, she says an election judge checked a voting manual and then allowed her to vote on a paper ballot. 

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

A new constitutional amendment requires Missourians show photo ID when they cast a ballot.

That means if you want to vote in Tuesday’s special election, you’ll need to take your ID into your polling place.

Here’s what you need to know.

I’m registered to vote, and I have a current driver’s license.

Charvex / Wikipedia Commons

Next week's primary elections will be the first under a new set of voter ID rules in the state of Missouri. While Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft says the regulations will help thwart fraud, some civil rights groups worry about voter suppression and have sued the state in response.

File Photo / KCUR 89.3

Officials from multiple states say they will not turn over voter data requested by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

This week, Kobach sent letters to all 50 states requesting their "publicly available voter roll data" to help with the work of a presidential commission on "election integrity" established earlier this year.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft is confident the state's new voter ID law won’t disenfranchise anyone.

“I’ve spent over 70,000 miles traveling the state over the last two years, and I’ve challenged anyone to point to someone that can’t vote under this law that would’ve been able to vote under the prior law,” says Ashcroft, who was in Blue Springs Tuesday morning to explain how the law has changed. “No one’s been able to find someone.”

A day before Missouri’s new voter ID law takes effect, a coalition of civil rights groups and Democratic politicians warned Wednesday that the law could disenfranchise minority voters and older people.

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft, whose office oversees elections, scoffed at the concerns, arguing that “if you’re a registered voter, you’ll be able to vote.”

File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

President Donald Trump today named Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to help lead a commission on voter fraud and suppression, a body he has promised to create since taking office nearly four months ago.

Kobach, who has gained national notoriety for his claims of widespread voter fraud, will serve as vice chair alongside Vice President Mike Pence, who will chair the commission.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Every major advancement of African-Americans since the Civil War has been met and opposed by "white rage," says Carol Anderson. Today, she explains how resentful whites have looked to halt the progress of blacks through discriminatory policies, laws, intimidation and violence.

A cold arctic blast greeted lawmakers, lobbyists and reporters who filtered into the state Capitol Wednesday for the start of Missouri's 2017 legislative session.

But it didn't take long for things to heat up, at least on the House side of the building.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

We take a close look at election results from Kansas, Missouri, and the nation with a panel of political journalists. We're also joined by Kansas City 4th District Councilwoman Jolie Justus, U.S.

Briana O'Higgins / KCUR 89.3

By 7 a.m Tuesday, the line for voting at All Souls Church in midtown Kansas City had more than 100 people in it.

Numerous other polling places around the metro reported a similar early morning rush, especially in Missouri, where there was no early voting period as in Kansas.

"I was expecting to wait, and I'm glad to wait," said Linda Rives, a voter who waited at All Souls. "Sometimes I come here, and you can walk right in. There's hardly anybody here [other elections], but I'm excited to see such long lines today. It means people are participating." 

BigStock Images

Most of us have a week to go before the Big Vote. Kansans can cast their ballots early (and many are doing so), but Missourians have to wait until Nov. 8. For everyone who wants to vote on Election Day, here are some things you need to know:

1. What’s my registration status?

It doesn’t hurt to check before you go.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

In his third and last stop of the day, Missouri gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens made a campaign appearance in Kansas City Sunday night, after stops in both Springfield and St. Louis.

In what campaign workers described as one of the more crowded rallies of the day, over 130 people gathered for the event, with women making up about half of the crowd, many holding pink campaign signs reading "Women for Greitens."

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker joined Greitens on the campaign trail.

First, local undecided voters react to the slug fest that was the second presidential debate. Then, a look at a few measures on the Missouri 2016 ballot concerning cigarette taxes and establishing ID requirements for voting. 

Debunking The Voter Fraud Myth

Sep 29, 2016

In an effort to protect against voter fraud, new and stricter voter I.D. laws have proliferated. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach now requires proof of citizenship when registering to vote. We take a look at how claims of ballot-rigging are not as accurate as once thought.

Guests: 

Matt Hodapp / KCUR 89.3

On this week's episode of the Statehouse Blend Missouri podcast, Rep. Joe Don McGaugh (R-Carrollton) talks about the 2016 veto session and the upcoming election.

Guests:

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

As he gears up for next week's veto session, Governor Jay Nixon is maintaining his stance on two controversial bills — a gun law that would loosen concealed carry regulations and a voter ID law. 

Both bills were passed with veto-proof majorities in both chambers, and the Republican legislature is expected to try and override the vetoes. 

Still, Nixon is doubling down on his position.

With regards to legislation that would require photo identification to vote in Missouri, he says Republicans are trying to bring attention to what he calls "a nonexistent problem."

Secretary of State Kris Kobach says the voting in yesterday’s primary election went smoothly across Kansas, with no significant problems. But one issue that remains is how many Kansans cast provisional ballots after a judge allowed 17,000 previously suspended voters to take part in the election.

The provisional ballots from those voters will be hand counted in the coming days. Kobach says he does not expect any issues handling those extra votes.

In the latest development in a long-standing disagreement between Kansas election officials and the federal Election Assistance Commission, a judge in Kansas has ruled that the state can't require people to show proof of U.S. citizenship when registering to vote at a motor vehicle office.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR 89.3

As the Missouri and Kansas 2016 legislative sessions come to an end, Statehouse Blend hosts, Sam Zeff and Brian Ellison, discuss the most impactful and surprising events on both sides of the state line with the assistance of guest host, Kyle Palmer.

Wikimedia Commons - CC

Did U.S. Election Assistance Commissioner Brian Newby's recently unearthed emails with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach violate federal rules? 

The Washington, D.C.-based advocacy group Allied Progress alleges they did and now wants the EAC's Inspector General to dig further into the matter. 

The right to vote was not in the original version of our Constitution, but the fight to vote has been with us since Revolutionary times. Hear how voter ID, suppressed voter turnout and other issues are not exclusive to the current day.

Guest:

  • Michael Waldman is president of the Brennan Center of Justice and the author of The Fight to Vote.

KCUR

Republican Missouri Sen. Will Kraus from District 08 provides an insider perspective on the Missouri General Assembly as we discuss prefiled bills about conceal carry, voter IDs, and infrastructure. 

This is an excerpt from Statehouse Blend. You can listen to the full episode here, or by subscribing on iTunes.

Guests:

  • Will Kraus, Senator from District 08, Missouri General Assembly 
  • Nic Zweifel, Citizen
  • C.J. Janovy, Arts Reporter, KCUR

KCUR

Republican Missouri Sen. Will Kraus from District 08 provides an insider perspective on the Missouri General Assembly as we discuss prefiled bills about conceal carry, voter IDs, and infrastructure. 

Guests:

  • Will Kraus, Senator from District 08, Missouri General Assembly 
  • Nic Zweifel, Citizen
  • C.J. Janovy, Arts Reporter, KCUR

Voter registration continues to be a hot issue, including in Kansas, where in 2011, the state instituted a strict photo ID rule and a proof of citizenship requirement for those registering to vote. Now, some voting experts advocate a different way of handling the registration of voters: automatic and permanent voter registration. We discuss it on this edition of Up to Date.

Guests:

Frank Morris / KCUR

In Kansas, you have to show proof that you are a U.S. citizen to register to vote, and that requirement has held up tens of thousands of registrations and produced an enormous list of would-be voters who are essentially in limbo — all because they haven’t shown a birth certificate or passport. 

Now Kansas’ top elections official in Kansas wants that list purged, and that’s leading to a fight. 

County election officials in Kansas are starting to cancel incomplete voter registrations that are more than 90 days old.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach put the rule in place to clear out thousands of incomplete registrations. There’s a legal challenge against the new rule, but a court last week declined to put it on hold.

Shawnee County Election Commissioner Andrews Howell says it could take weeks to sort through and identify the registrations that will be canceled.

This week, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office will take comments on a plan to cancel incomplete voter registrations after 90 days. There’s a public hearing on the proposal Wednesday in Topeka.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach  joins Statehouse Blend to discuss voter fraud, immigration, and his treatment in the media.

Guests:

  • Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State
  • Melissa Carlson, Citizen Voice
  • Nick Haines, Executive Producer of Public Affairs, KCPT

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