Greg Lam Pak Ng / Flickr - CC

When US Airways Flight 1549 took off from La Guardia airport on January 15, 2009, no one expected it to come to rest minutes later in the middle of the Hudson River. A movie released this month recalls the incident and the quick thinking of pilot, Chesley Sullenberger. Sully recounted that experience with host Steve Kraske in October 2009.

ivabalk / Pixabay / Public Domain

While some passengers may find the additional fees for carry-on bags to be an annoying part of traveling, a group of economists led by a University of Kansas professor found that these fees have actually had a positive impact on the flying experience as a whole.

Mazhar Arikan, who teaches at KU's School of Business, published the findings in this study

It's a familiar sight in airplanes today: hordes of people, trying to avoid the checked baggage fee, struggling to shove their wheelie suitcases in an overhead compartment.

But a KU professor says that checked baggage fees not only are improving an airline's bottom line — they also make the flying experience better.


It was a conversation with his father when he was only seven years old that laid out the direction of author Andrew Solomon's life. Now, Solomon has chronicled his travels in a new book of essays, Far & Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change: Seven Continents, 25 Years.

We check in with two local artists who, about a year ago, quit their jobs to travel the country in a 16-foot Airstream trailer.


Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

On average, about 10,000 Americans retire every day, and rather than “aging in place,” retirees increasingly are doing just the opposite.  

Take Diane Herynk, president of the Working Sams RV club. “Sams” is short for Samaritans. Good Samaritans is a national camping group with hundreds of local chapters. The Working Sams group is based in Topeka, Kansas.

“Once upon a time when this was a brand new club, everyone worked," recalls Herynk. “And no one could go camping until they got off work. But, now everyone is retired, but we’re still Working Sams.”

Kansas City-native Sara Dykman just completed a 3,500 mile, 13-state adventure that took her and her crew from Glacier National Park, to a series of creeks and rivers, to the Missouri River and eventually to the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico — all by canoe.

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR

Imagine swapping your cubicle for a beach.

For Kansas City-native Shawn Hansen, that’s not a dream — it’s real life. Sometimes that beach is Rio, sometimes it's Mexico — it doesn’t really matter where, as long as he has his laptop and a decent Wi-Fi signal.

Hansen gave up his permanent residence in Kansas City in January 2014, opting instead to travel the world doing freelance writing, technical consulting and teaching English.

There’s a term for people who leverage technology in order to travel freely around the globe: digital nomads.

How many times have you dreamed that your workplace was anywhere but a cubicle in an office? Perhaps a beach somewhere? On this edition of Up To Date, we speak with people who have given up their permanent residence for a laptop, a passport and a travel guide.


From the podcast the memory palace, by Nick DiMeo: The Ballad of Captain Dwight, an African-American astronaut who, during JFK's administration, almost made it to the moon.

photo courtesy of the author

Delays, misplaced reservations, waking up hungover and discovering your money is gone ... those are the hazards of travel today. Or are they? A writer with Kansas roots tells us about The Misadventures of Wenamun, his new comic about an ancient Egyptian priest who is known as "history's original literary traveler."


David Goehring / Flickr-CC

The summer months are fast approaching, which means summer vacations are too. Whether you're taking a day trip or an international excursion, travel apps can take some of the burdens of planning, booking, even packing, off your shoulders.

In the first half of Friday's Up to Date, guest Dustin Jacobsen joins Steve Kraske with his recommendations for travel apps to help with everything from currency conversion to finding good hotel deals.


After losing his job and his first wife, William Least Heat-Moon needed to do some soul searching. Thirteen thousand miles and dozens of no-name towns later, he had plenty of stories to tell.

In the first part of Thursday's Up to Date, we sit down with the New York Times best-selling author to talk about that fateful trip and his career since.


Ever dreamed of cruising across the United States with a retro Airstream trailer named Ethel? What about making that journey in your 70s?

Your Road Trip Memories

Jul 2, 2013

Did your car break down five miles away from the closest gas station? Did you pass the time by playing the license plate game? What unexpected discoveries did you make while traveling America’s roads?

On Tuesday's Up to Date, Mark Sedenquist, the editor of RoadTrip America, gives you tips for you're next trek across the highways of America. 

Here are tips and advice from Sedenquist for the next time you plan that long trip in the car:

Matt Kleinmann / Matt Kleinmann Photography

From the hair museum, to the bridge to nowhere and Big Brutus, there are some interesting and even bizarre things to see and do in Missouri and Kansas.  

So grab the kids and a cooler, and take a day trip to one (or more) of these quirky destinations in our corner of the Midwest.

Ever had one of those vacations where nothing seems to go right? Your luggage gets lost, the reservation’s for the wrong day, and you accidentally asked for a sub-compact car for your family of five?

Catherine Karnow

From the Australian Outback to Bollywood, Albanian farmland to Vietnam, National Geographic travel photographer Catherine Karnow has been around the world to capture its images with her camera.

Food Critics: Destination Dining

Jun 15, 2012
Willowtree2005 / flickr

Coming up on Central Standard Friday, host Charles Ferruzza and the Food Critics share their favorite spots outside the KC metro area for dining -- including Baldwin City, Leavenworth, Atchison, and Rocheport.

Philosopher Alain de Botton says it’s time for those who believe in religion and those who don’t to stop denigrating each other and find common ground on art, community and morality.

It's easy to vilify an entire country because of its political leadership. But don't you think it'd be interesting to explore the Middle Eastern treasures of Iran or visit the southeast Asian jewel of Vietnam?

Travel from KCI the day before Thanksgiving; relatively stress-free.Photo by Laura Ziegler

Kansas City, Missouri – While airline industry officials nationally expect a drop in the number of people flying this holiday season, that's not supposed to be the case at KCI. The Kansas Aviation Department say almost 400 thousand will be travelling through the Kansas City airport this holiday season.

As the Thanksgiving holiday weekend began,most said their experiences were good, that lines were not long, and that the delays were much shorter than they'd expected.

Using Technology To Travel

Sep 19, 2011
Ed Yourdon / Flickr

If you have a smartphone, it probably goes everywhere with you… but, what if you’re leaving the country? Can you charge your iPad in Costa Rica? And much will your mobile phone company charge for roaming in Malaysia? Join the Computer Guys as they search for the best ways to avoid technology snafus on your travels abroad.