therapy

Todd Feeback / The Hale Center for Journalism at KCPT

If the idea of music therapy brings to mind 1960s-era folk singers warbling to bemused patients, you haven’t seen Deanna Hanson-Abromeit at work.

At Operation Breakthrough in Kansas City, the University of Kansas assistant professor sings a good morning song to Daren, a curious, if slightly cautious, infant. 

The tune is a simple one, and the singer bubbles over with enthusiasm, but her musical interventions are more of a conversation than a performance.

Hien Nguyen CC Flickr

   

At "cuddle houses," you can pay a stranger to cuddle with you--it's supposed to be a form of touch therapy. Professional cuddling has set up shop in Wisconsin, New York and has now come to Kansas City. How does touch affect our physical and psychological well-being?

Guests:

  • Anne Graham, ​former professional cuddler
  • Jason O’Brien, director, Cuddle: A Documentary
  • Carolyn Guenther Molloy,  infant touch therapist, Stress Free Start LLC

Alzheimer's and dementia can make loved ones appear unreachable, like shells of their former selves. A new documentary and increasingly popular treatment program use music to connect with the dynamic inner lives of patients. 

Guests:

Using Music As Therapy

Oct 30, 2013
Children's Hospital Colorado / Google Images -- CC

Music therapy has been a growing form of complementary medicine for the past 50 years. Studies have shown music therapy can help with everything from Alzheimer’s to depression to developmental disorders and even cancer treatment. 

We invited three local music therapists to speak about local and national research being conducted, as well as their own experience in using vocal and instrumental music in a patient's treatment and recovery process. 

Guests:

One of the problems of autism is that its origins are still fairly mysterious. But a more pressing, everyday concern for parents is how to pay for therapy for their children without going bankrupt.

Speech and communication is a fundamental and necessary part of our days.  Being able to articulate I thoughts, feelings and desires is perhaps the most distinguishing characteristic of being human.  But how hard is it to correct or relearn this intrinsic skill?  Today we explore the practice of Speech Therapy with Carol Koch, Associate Professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Rockhurst University and Shatonda Jones, a Visiting Instructor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Rockhurst University.


Dealing With The Loss Of A Child

Nov 5, 2012
http://catalystsforhealth.com

When a parent outlives their child, the amount of grief, remorse, and guilt can be overwhelming.  These emotions are compounded when dealing with the matters of death that follow.

What Your Story Says About You

Jun 4, 2012
Aptmetaphor / flickr

You know the phrase "that’s my story and I’m sticking to it?" Don’t! On this Monday's Central Standard, learn how changing the way you tell your story can help free you from your past.

KDHE report on Kansas dental workforce

Analysts have known for years that Kansas has a severe shortage of dentists -- and that shortage is getting worse.  

The Remarkable Impact Of Art Therapy

Feb 15, 2012

From African refugee camps to Alzheimer’s clinics to returning vets from Iraq and Afghanistan, discoveries in the field of art therapy are helping to change lives.

Parenting

Dec 5, 2011
Flickr/Daquella manera

Can you ever love your child too much? Today on the show, join Dr. Bruce Liese for a look at what happens when parents are too attuned to their children, and how our culture’s obsession with happiness can lead our children towards an unhappy adulthood.

GUEST:
Dr. Bruce Liese, University of Kansas School of Medicine 

Kansas City, MO – Missouri's autism insurance mandate takes effect this month. The law requires insurance companies to cover autism therapies for children. The state's gearing up to license therapists to do the work, but as KCUR's Elana Gordon reports, that process is just getting underway.
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Missouri's new law requires state-regulated insurance companies to cover up to $40,000 a year in an intensive therapy, called applied behavioral analysis (ABA), for children up to the age of 18.

Kansas City, MO – Jason Strachman Miller, a senior and editor-in-chief of Kansas State University's Collegian, stumbled upon a gripping story while researching a project for his Computer Assisted Reporting class.