TellKCUR

You don't need a TV screen or a newspaper subscription to get your news anymore.

Gone are the days of waiting for a specific time or a delivery boy to check in on the day's weather or headlines.

Desktop computers and smartphones bring news to our fingertips via websites and apps, countless blogs and social media outlets.

So, do you need a quick hit of Twitter before starting your day or is the Huffington Post a must-read? What about your hometown newspaper or news stations?

Earthworm / Flickr--CC

As a nation we have been talking about race a lot lately. And with Mother's Day just ahead we thought we would pair two unlikely subjects.

"How did your mother talk with you about race?" we asked.

What you told us ran the gamut from “my mother didn’t talk to me about race,” to “she let us know her feelings, but indirectly,” to “she told us exactly what she thought and what she wanted us to know.”

We’re linking two slightly unlikely topics this week for our Tell KCUR question.

As we consider the unrest in Baltimore, Ferguson, and other places around the country and as Mother’s Day approaches, we thought it was a good opportunity to ask about race — and your mother.

Tell KCUR: How did your mother talk to you about race?

Did she talk to you about it at all, and if so, was it direct, coded, comfortable or uncomfortable?

Scutter / Flickr--CC

Kansas City is up-and-coming. We're totally cool, and this October we found out our city (and our boys in blue) look great on national television.

We are used to telling visitors what they should do while they are here (Eat the barbecue! Go to the Nelson-Atkins!). 

Kevin Harber / Flickr--CC

The 2014 American League Champion Kansas City Royals  face the Chicago White Sox in their home opener Monday afternoon. And to get ready, we asked you to imagine yourself in the line up. What music would you want to hear blasted over the speakers at Kauffman Stadium as you stepped up to bat?

We had a deluge of Tweets, Facebook comments and phone calls with a range of responses — from the silence of John Cage’s "4'33"" (hmmmm ...)  to "You Sexy Thing" by Hot Chocolate, to George Frederic Handel’s Royal Fireworks Suite.

Bennie Campbell called to say he’d like hear Jim Neighbors singing "To Dream the Impossible Dream." Come on, Bennie, have a little confidence!

Baseball’s opening day is just right around the corner — so imagine this — as you enter the batter’s box the PA person announces your name, followed by a tune.

But what is it? Is it your favorite song? Do the lyrics describe you? Is it lucky?

Tell KCUR: What Would Be Your 'At-Bat' Theme Song?

Tweet us your answers with the #TellKCUR hashtag or go to our Facebook page and leave your answer in a comment.  

Just who is the middle class?  The Wall Street Journal wondered in a piece earlier this year. The paper points out the term means little, and that’s why politicians love to use it.

Middle class in the Kansas City metro is certainly different than middle class in San Francisco, but how should we decide who fits into that category?

Bullying became the topic of a national conversation in 2010 after a young college man committed suicide after his roommate filmed him being intimate with another man.

Since, there have been major campaigns to combat bullies and bullying, and schools across the country have mobilized anti-bullying efforts and policies.

Even though both Wyandotte and Johnson Counties were founded with connections to Native American tribes, the two have evolved into dramatically different places.

As we pursue the next segment of our look into lines that unite and divide the metro, we're turning our attention the boundary between Wyandotte and Johnson Counties. What do you know to be true about these counties? What have you heard that isn't true? 

Tell KCUR: What do people get wrong about Wyandotte and/or Johnson Counties?

Wikimedia Commons - CC

As legislators in Kansas and Missouri get back to work, we thought it a good time to ask you, the people of Kansas City, what you would like to ask them. Or tell them, if you're so inclined. 

We got an array of responses back.

@Mattk2 tweeted: if given the choice between funding education and cutting taxes, which would you choose and who (did you) listen to?

A number of you referred money in politics.

As the legislative sessions in both Kansas and Missouri get under way, lawmakers face a number of challenging and controversial issues.

In Kansas, education funding and state finances are at the center of debate. In Missouri, school transfers and ethics are at the top of a long agenda.

In 2014, we launched a series to look at why people come to Kansas City and why they stay, called Going To Kansas City.

file photo / Harvest Public Media

Here at KCUR we grew a lot in 2014, not only in numbers but also in the way we go about reporting the news. Our Community Engagement team launched a long-term project and mobilized our staff to get out and meet you and to listen more to our community.

It's here, another year. 2015. 

Last year was a big one for KCUR. Our newsroom grew and grew; we launched a big project called Beyond Our Borders, a health collaborative called Heartland Health Monitor and a new talk show with a new host.

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

We asked for haikus/ to sum up 2014/ Thanks, Kansas City.

That is our thank you poem to everyone who obliged us and answered this week’s Tell KCUR question: What are your most important memories of 2014 in haiku?

The three-line, five-seven-five-syllable formula proved most effective in conveying 2014, with muses ranging from sports, to engagements, to family and public tragedies — plus one of KCUR's transmission hiccups.

Courtesy photo / KCUR

The past year was an eventful one in the Kansas City area, marked by big moments in sports, politics and high-profile tragedies.

We want to know what memories you think of when you ponder 2014.

But this week's Tell KCUR question isn't that simple. We want you to use a little poetry, too.

Tell KCUR:  What are your most important memories of 2014 in haiku?

To put it another way, "KC, what’s your fave/ 2014 memory/Haikus only please."

Mingo Hagen / Flickr--CC

As podcasts pick up in popularity across the country, we wanted to see what Kansas Citians were choosing for their earbuds.

This week, we asked: What podcasts are you listening to? Why?

The question came as we prepared for our event, “Serial: The Listening Party,” set for Thursday night in Westport.  

Courtesy photo / KCUR

 

The whodunnit treatment of a real-life murder mystery in "Serial" the podcast, from the producers of "This American Life" has captivated millions of listeners.

The podcasting medium's first "breakout hit" — as dubbed by the New York Times — has us wondering about other podcasts that are on  your radar.

michaelfranks6 / Flickr--CC

Kansas Citians love eating and drinking, so it should come as no surprise that food and drinks top their list of the best Kansas City gifts.

In our social media quest for a rundown of presents that would represent the Kansas City area , you shot back a grocery list of items that sound like the makings for a fun holiday party: regional beer, popcorn, coffee, chocolate, pastries, toffee, nuts and more.

And the list wouldn’t be complete without the ample mentions of Kansas City barbecue sauce.

Courtesy photo / KCUR

 

When you want to send a little bit of the Kansas City area to friends and families during the holidays, what's your go-to gift?

Maybe it's a jar of barbecue sauce or a Kansas City Royals T-shirt. Perhaps it's a bag of sunflower seeds or a six-pack of locally brewed beer.

As we enter the holiday shopping season, divulge your Kansas City-inspired wish list.

Tell KCUR: What's the best Kansas City gift?

alamosbasement / Flickr--CC

Geography plays a big role in how Kansas Citians decide where to send their kids to school.

At least that’s what we heard back from parents when we asked them this week about how they made the big decision.

File photo / KCUR

As we explore state line in the Kansas City area as a uniter and divider in our Beyond Our Borders series, this issue continues to crop up — schools.

Parents are very passionate about how and why they've chosen certain schools in the metropolitan area for their children. 

With charter schools, private schools, public schools and application-based specialized schools on both sides of the state line in the region, we're curious about how you reached your decision.

Wikimedia Commons

Online dating doesn't seem any worse or fruitful than traditional dating, according to feedback we received this week from avid online daters in the Kansas City area.

Earlier this week, in anticipation of our storytelling event with NPR, "Storied: The Science of Online Dating," we asked our listeners: What are your online dating success and horror stories?

We heard a mix of recounts of dating mishaps and successful couplings.  

File photo / KCUR

Maybe the allegedly tall, dark  and handsome man you connected with online after hundreds of emails turned out to be a dud.

Or perhaps the woman who gave you a five-star rating on OKCupid.com was so wonderful, you ended up marrying her.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A Kansas race that is catching attention from political junkies around the country has Kansas City-area voters captivated, too.

That’s according to feedback we heard on social media in response to our Tell KCUR question of the week. We asked, “What’s the most important political race to you in election 2014? Why?

“KS Gov race for sure! Need child advocates,” Alexis Ceule (@AlexisCeule) tells us on Twitter.

File photo / KCUR

During this election season, are you focusing your voting attention on Congressional seats or local City Council races?

Are any Constitutional amendments more significant to you or do you spend your energy following candidates running for state offices?

Kansas may be under the national spotlight for its governor’s contest, but we know there are a lot of other candidates and issues at stake on both sides of the state line next week on Election Day.

Atomic Hot Links / Flickr--CC

The mayors of Kansas City, Mo., and San Francisco may really be betting honorable things like feeding the homeless and reading to children if their teams win the World Series.

But if the Royals triumph over the San Francisco giants, Kansas City wants something sweeter — chocolate.

Courtesy photo / KCUR

Five-hundred pounds of Rice-A-Roni?

A trolley car for Kansas City's new streetcar line?

C’mon, Kansas City. We want to know what you think San Francisco should pony up if the Royals beat the Giants in the World Series. And what should Kansas City dish out if the Royals lose?

Elle Moxley / KCUR

As public opinion changes and support for same-sex marriage increases across the United States, we reached out to Kansas Citians to see whether their views had taken a turn.

Our curiosity comes as the state of Kansas is making moves toward and away from making gay unions legal in the Sunflower State.  

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that opened up the question of gay-marriage in many more states reverberated in Kansas last week.

In Johnson County, a judge allowed clerks to accept applications for marriage licenses. But couples were soon disappointed when the Kansas Supreme Court put a temporary halt to those licenses Friday.

Pages