social media

A lot of people think social media is cutting into how well we interact with each other in real life. A local researcher says that may not be the case.

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The TV series Star Trek went where no one had gone before, both in its day and in the reality it created. Now, we Earthlings are using instruments and processes originally imagined by the creator and writers of the series, while our struggles with the issues of race and ideology it addressed in the 1960s continue.

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We live in a world filled with options. We’re constantly being asked to “like” or “dislike,” but what are we missing out on when everything is being catered to our preferences?

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Gaining prominence first as Lieutenant Sulu on Star Trek, George Takei's fame has spread off the stage, too. On this edition of Up To Date, Takei talks about his work advocating for social justice and how he maintains such a deft social media presence.

George Takei will appear at Planet Comicon Kansas City at Bartle Hall on May 21 and 22. For more information, or to buy passes, visit the Planet Comicon website.

Social media can be a place where middle schoolers feel like they can develop relationships. But the dangers of sharing information on the Internet can be frightening. We talk about navigating a complicated online world. 

Guest:

  • Dr. Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.

Kansas Citians Share Health Care Horror Stories

Jan 7, 2016
Artur Bergman / Flickr -- CC

 

A broken jaw during gall bladder surgery. Waiting 95 minutes for a doctor’s appointment. Being hit by a nurse.

When we asked, “What was your worst experience with health care in Kansas City?” you didn’t hold back.

Complaints ranged from access to health care to interactions with health professionals and facilities gone wrong.

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

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Last November, a University of Kansas student was expelled for posting derogatory tweets about his ex-girlfriend and fellow KU student. The case went to the Kansas Court of Appeals which last week handed down its ruling, finding for that student and ordering his reinstatement.

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Should universities police student behavior on social media? Recently, a KU student was expelled for comments he made about an ex-girlfriend on Twitter. A reporter and a student discuss the case and whether social media is part of a school's learning environment.

Steve Kraske / KCUR

When facial plastic surgeon Dr. David Kriet sits down to do a consultation with a patient in his Kansas City office, it isn’t unusual for his patient to show him a selfie.

Five years ago, the selfie would have been out of place, even foreign, in a doctor's office.

Selfie Surgeries

Jul 21, 2015

Health professionals have seen a rise in requests for cosmetic procedures because patients don't like how they look in selfies. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske discusses the reasons and implications of these procedures.

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A recent Pew study shows that a growing number of teens are going online almost constantly. We discuss how young peoples' relationships to technology are changing and explore what effects increased social media use has on teens.

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Kansas Citians Consume News In Many Different Ways

May 26, 2015
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As we reported last week on how The Kansas City Star is changing, we wanted to know more about how  news is consumed in Kansas City.

We took to social media and our airwaves and asked, “How do you keep up with the news?”  

If you favor a hike in the minimum wage, are you obligated to boycott businesses that don't pay their employees enough? Also, should a distasteful comment on Twitter ruin your life? The Ethics Professors tackle these issues on this edition of Up To Date

Tell KCUR: How Do You Keep Up With The News?

May 15, 2015
KCUR

You don't need a TV screen or a newspaper subscription to get your news anymore.

Gone are the days of waiting for a specific time or a delivery boy to check in on the day's weather or headlines.

Desktop computers and smartphones bring news to our fingertips via websites and apps, countless blogs and social media outlets.

So, do you need a quick hit of Twitter before starting your day or is the Huffington Post a must-read? What about your hometown newspaper or news stations?

The "selfie culture" is changing how young people see themselves, express themselves, and communicate. But sometimes, that expression can lead to trouble. We explore the darker side of the "selfie culture" and what parents need to know about it. 

Guests: 

  • Wes Crenshaw is a psychologist board certified in couples and family psychology.
  • Kyra Haas is a senior at Lawrence Free State High School and co-author of the Double Take advice column in the Lawrence Journal-World.
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What do you do when your sleep schedule is routinely disrupted by the demands of parenthood?

If you're Refe and Susan Tuma, you respond with the spark of creative genius that only delirium can inspire. You get some plastic dinosaurs, put them in the sink, put toothbrushes in their hands, smear toothpaste all over the place, and then?

You go to bed. 

Kansas City, Country Bask In Royals Victory

Oct 1, 2014
Cut4 / Twitter

Royals chatter dominated social media on Wednesday, the day after the baseball team in Kansas City, Mo., clinched its first postseason win in 29 years.

Kansas Citians and national media took to Twitter to document the dramatic victory over the Oakland Athletics and share their team spirit.  

Here’s a recap of some of the tweets getting the most attention, along with highlights from Kansas City-area fans.

When Chris Fleck began working on a commercial for the East Hills mall, he knew he wanted to go "different." He succeeded. The commercial has gone viral, generating more than two million hits on YouTube. The bait getting people to watch it? Suggestions that it may well be the worst shopping mall commercial of all time.

A new social media platform that helps people connect with their neighbors has entered into partnerships with Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan. Which got us wondering: What happened to a friendly wave across the driveway?

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Esther Honig, Before and After

A young Kansas City journalist named Esther Honig, who contributes to KCUR, had an idea for a project.

She sent a simple, straightforward portrait of herself to Photoshoppers around the globe with a request to make her beautiful. She wanted to see what that would mean to people in different parts of the world, investigating how culturally specific definitions of beauty might play into the results.

Wikimedia -- CC

The Kansas Board of Regents has decided to add a free speech provision to a controversial social media policy, a decision criticized as “window dressing.”

Regent Chairman Fred Logan, who along with the rest of the board has come under fire nationally from professors and First Amendment advocates, said during a board meeting this week that he does not believe the policy restricts staff and faculty from openly expressing their opinions, the Lawrence Journal-World reports.

What You Remember From The JJ’s Explosion

Feb 19, 2014
Elana Gordon / KCUR

One year ago, many Kansas Citians knew about a natural gas explosion at JJ’s Restaurant before news outlets began to report the story.

Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the blast that hundreds of Kansas Citians saw firsthand or felt on the Country Club Plaza.  

We wanted to know more about what you remembered from that evening.

@TutoriousKC

Snow days in Kansas City mean sledding with the kids and game nights with friends.

But snow days also have brought once-in-a-lifetime experiences, like a first kiss or making a new set of friends on a stalled bus, according to feedback from our listeners this week.

Thousands of Kansas Citians found themselves at home this week during a snowstorm that dropped 10 or more inches across the metro area.

Alyson Raletz/KCUR

 The line between individual social media activity and employment status isn’t a clear one, according to feedback we received this week from listeners.

When we asked “Should your boss be able to fire you for what you tweet?” on the air and online, the responses showed the issue of social media and the workplace as a divisive one in Kansas City.  

We received many emphatic yeses, citing personal responsibility.

The Kansas Board of Regents’ new social media policy for university personnel is at the center of heated debate, both inside and outside the education world.

In the second part of Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk about the pros and cons of the policy.

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The Kansas Board of Regents Wednesday denied a faculty group’s request that it suspend a controversial social media policy that has received national criticism as harming free speech.

Emporia State Professor Sheryl Lidzy, representing the Council of Faculty Senate Presidents, asked for the suspension, saying the plan could harm the hiring of top quality faculty and continue to generate negative publicity.

The Kansas Board of Regents has approved a new social media policy for state university employees. Violating the policy could lead to sanctions, including dismissal.

Regents Chairman Fred Logan says there is a concern that social media can lead to what he calls "extraordinary damage" to institutions very quickly. He says the requirements are narrowly drawn and highlight exceptions to First Amendment protections that have been created by the courts.

You know you’re a Kansas City techie when “@KCUR wants to know.”

That’s how Kansas City Startup Village (Twitter: @KCSV) filled in the blank on Twitter when we asked our listeners and followers on social media to complete this sentence: You know you’re a Kansas City techie when …

KCUR

Missouri's two largest cities sit at the top of a list of the 20 happiest cities in the U.S., compiled by startup company, Jetpac.

St. Louis came in as the happiest city, based off of an analysis of images from social media site Instagram. Kansas City, Mo., came in at No. 2.

According to Business Insider, Jetpac has been analyzing millions of photos uploaded to Instagram to uncover trends in the United States.

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