sexual assault

Tristan Bowersox / Flickr, Creative Commons

California just passed a law establishing "yes means yes" as the statewide standard for consent, and President Obama recently issued a message to the nation calling assault on campus "an affront to our basic humanity." In the wake of some controversial local cases, where do local universities stand on this issue, and what are students saying?

Guests:

Yassie / Wikimedia Commons

Later this week, the University of Missouri Board of Curators will vote on a plan to change the way sexual assault and harassment complaints are handled.

But some faculty members say the process is moving forward a little too quickly.

University of Missouri system President Tim Wolfe is proposing a change that would require schools to investigate sexual harassment or discrimination cases within 60 days.

The proposal before the curators also would widen which employees must report harassment to the administration and change the hearing process.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Concerns about the way the University of Kansas handles sexual assault cases have been boiling over in recent weeks.

Reports of alleged sexual assaults garnering minor punishments have prompted protests and even a video produced by students telling others not to attend KU. Thursday night, university officials held a panel discussion where they answered questions, took suggestions and explained university policies surrounding sexual assault.

More than 100 people gathered for the discussion. Those who spoke expressed concerns about the process and suggested improvements.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The company that provided the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph its liability insurance in the 1970s says it shouldn't have to defend the church or pay damages in a litany of sexual abuse cases.

The U.S. Fidelity and Guaranty Co. filed suit in federal court Friday against the diocese, which has been sued by more than a dozen plaintiffs who say they were victims of sexual abuse in the '60s and '70s. In the majority of those cases, the court has dismissed all claims against the diocese except the intentional failure to supervise clergy.

Jail time is frequently the end result for rapists and child molesters. However, groups like the Larned State Hospital feel that sex offenders are often victims of abuse  and need outside help.

Treatment programs have been designed to reduce the risk of re-offending, but does treatment work well enough to keep communities safe? What if a sex offender cannot be rehabilitated? Should we keep them “in treatment” forever even after their jail term has expired?

On Monday's Central Standard, host Susan Wilson examines the complicated world of sex offender justice.

Village of Niles / Google Images -- CC

Sexual assault used to be such a taboo issue that it wasn’t even covered by the media. Those affected by sexual assault would often hide in shame, but as it has becomes more public, young people are flocking to their Facebook and Twitter accounts to call names and take sides.

Missouri will not ease up on former convicts who committed sex crimes when they were juveniles, and state lawmakers are getting praise for the decision in some law enforcement circles.

In the legislature, there was enough concern about the bill passed during the regular session that it was never even brought up for a vote in this week’s special session to consider the governor’s vetoes.

This was one that got Governor Jay Nixon’s red stamp. 

Governor Nixon Vetoes Sex Registry Bill

Aug 21, 2013
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

Arguing that he was keeping nearly 900 sex offenders from being  let loose on unknowing communities, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon was in Kansas City explaining his veto of a bill passed by the legislature. 

Looking At The Maryville Rape Case

Jul 15, 2013
Peggy Lowe / KCUR

Cases involving teen sexual assault have been on the national radar lately, and one town in the Kansas City area is under that microscope. 

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

Read our full investigative report on this story here.

January 8, 2012

1 a.m. — Daisy Coleman, 14, and a 13-year-old girlfriend sneak out of the Coleman’s home after texting with Matthew Barnett, 17. They go through a basement window at the Barnett home and begin drinking out of what is referred to as the “bitch cup.” Including Barnett, present were Nick Groumoutis, Cole Forney, Jordan Zech and a minor boy.

Why Was The Maryville Rape Case Dropped?

Jul 11, 2013
Peggy Lowe / KCUR

  

The first thing Daisy Coleman remembers is her surprise that she was still alive.

“I was just like, I thought I was dead at first,” she said.

An incoherent Coleman, then 14, crawled to the front door of her family’s home in Maryville, Mo. It was a Sunday morning, Jan. 8, 2012, 5 a.m. Her younger brother, Tristin, and mother, Melinda, heard a thumping and at first thought it was their dogs trying to come in.

photo by dan verbeck

U.S. Attorneys from Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa will gather next week for a conference centered on domestic violence and sexual assault in Indian Country. 

U.S. Attorney for Kansas Barry Grissom says the statistics on violence against women and girls in tribal communities can only be described as shocking.

Frank Morris / KCUR

A Jackson County judge today found Bishop Robert Finn of the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph guilty of failing to report suspected child abuse.   It’s the first time such a high-ranking Catholic Church official has been convicted on a criminal charge.

This month, Palle Rilinger retired after 27 years as a social worker and president of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault.  MOCSA focuses on reducing the harm of sexual assault and abuse through treatment, prevention and advocacy.

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