sexual assault

Facing The Hookup Culture At College

Jul 18, 2016

The first year at college opens the door to a new life away from parental supervision.  As social life on college campus gravitates toward casual sex, we look at what students should consider before joining the hookup culture.

Guests:

  • Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.
  • Sarah Lieberman, originally from Lawrence, Kansas, is a sophomore at Cornell University. 

  In this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors, joined by Angie Blumel of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault, wade through the controversy surrounding an editorial in The Kansas City Star that encouraged rape victims to "accept [their] role in what happened." We also look at the impact violent images in the media have, and whether or not the political process is "rigged" to exclude the wishes of regular voters.

 Guests:

KCUR 89.3

A column published Friday evening in The Kansas City Star website (and in the print edition Saturday) has been removed from The Star’s website, after backlash from the community and other media outlets.

The column, titled “Women can take action to prevent rapes,” argues that women should take responsibility for their bodies by not getting so intoxicated that they become victims of sexual assault or rape.

That elicited strong reactions on Facebook and Twitter.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

A few months ago, the Squad of Sisters — a local group dedicated to combating sexual violence — released a zine called "Worried About Westport." The photocopied booklet chronicles personal stories of sexual assault in the area. Westport is one of the most popular nightlife destinations in Kansas City, but is it safe? 

We ask, what do reports of sexual assault and rape throughout the city tell us about our culture, and what can we do to make our community safer?

Guests:

Courtesy Beth Jacobs

Across the United States, thousands of men, women and children are being forced to work as prostitutes. 

Sex trafficking remains a big problem, but a small group is mobilizing the far-flung trucking industry to fight it.

That’s a big change from the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. At the time, she thought if you were prostitute, it was your choice.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon came to Kansas City Wednesday to sign legislation strengthening laws against human trafficking.

“We tend to think of human trafficking as something that happens in a distant, undeveloped country,” Nixon said. “But the tragic reality is, right here in the United States, human trafficking is a real and growing problem.”

mrhayata / Flickr

A harrowing story of human trafficking involving a Kansas college student on a military base. Plus, a discussion of the prevalence of this crime in our region.

Guests:

Peggy Lowe/ KCUR 89.3

Angry, anguished, and finally emboldened by a kind judge, a Kansas City woman who was raped and nearly killed 17 years ago on Thursday vowed to find her attacker’s other victims and help reform the law enforcement system.

There's a new phrase being used to describe what happens when, say, a government fails to protect its citizens, or a university fails to protect its students. What are the symptoms and side effects of being betrayed by an institution, and are there ways for institutions to make things right?

Guest:

Zach Lowry / Kansas State Interfraternity Council

Update 10:15 Thursday

Kansas State University officials responded to yesterdays student protest in a statement KCUR received last night. The statement says the university will publish clarifications about when and where it will investigate allegations of discrimination, including sexual assault. The direct response to the students can be read here.

The original post begins here.

Creative Commons-Flickr

Two Kansas State University students are suing the university for refusing to investigate their claims of rape because the violence occurred in fraternities located off campus.

In separate suits filed Wednesday in federal court in Kansas, the students allege the university was indifferent to their reports of rape. The women also allege the university violated their rights as consumers of public education in the state.

rolandojones / Flickr-CC

This story was updated at 1:58 p.m. to include the comments of a KU spokeswoman.

A second University of Kansas student has sued the university after she says she was sexually assaulted by the same football player who allegedly raped a former student who sued KU last month.

Tristan Bowersox / Creative Commons-Flickr

A former University of Kansas student whose parents sued KU for consumer fraud after they say she was raped on campus has now filed her own lawsuit against the university.

Daisy Tackett’s lawsuit seeks unspecified damages for violations of Title IX, the 1972 federal law that bars sex discrimination in education.

The suit, filed today in Douglas County District Court, says KU created a hostile environment by housing KU football players in a residence hall, Jayhawker Towers, that it had reason to know was unsafe.

Tristan Bowersox / Creative Commons-Flickr

A lawsuit against the University of Kansas by the parents of a student who was allegedly raped in one of its dorms seeks to break new legal ground.

Unlike other legal actions against universities over their handling of sexual assaults, this one seeks class action status and alleges violations of the state’s consumer protection law.

Has America created a culture of sexual violence? We talk about how this country’s social norms sanction rape and the role that men have in solving this serious issue.

Guests:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

It's not the norm, but it's not uncommon for fraternities to recruit high school seniors to join their organizations. Those that do often reach out to high school athletic coaches, and tap legacies (students with generational ties to the fraternity) and siblings for a night out on the town or a ball game.

At the University of Kansas, it is an age-old tradition.

Jane McQueeny, Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity & Access (IOA) at the University of Kansas, has resigned.

McQueeny has been the face of the university’s response to an increase in the number of sexual assault and discrimination complaints under the federal Title IX law. The increase does not necessarily mean an increase in the incidence of cases, but an increase in reporting. In the past, McQueeny has said higher numbers of complaints is a good thing because it means more people are coming forward.

“Jane was first person to head the newly-created Title IX office in 2012,” said Erin Barcomb-Peterson, with the KU Office of Public Affairs. “She spearheaded the role of the university’s response to sex discrimination complaints.”

Last November, a University of Kansas student was expelled for posting derogatory tweets about his ex-girlfriend and fellow KU student. The case went to the Kansas Court of Appeals which last week handed down its ruling, finding for that student and ordering his reinstatement.

Guests:

Wikipedia--CC

Nearly a third of female undergraduate students at the University of Missouri-Columbia say they have experienced some form of sexual assault or misconduct during their time at the school.

A survey released earlier this week by the Association of American University asked more than 150,000 students about their experience with sexual assault and sexual misconduct.

Of the 27 universities and more than 150,000 students that took part in the survey, MU had the third-highest rate.

Sexual assault on college campuses is getting new attention these days as societal attitudes change regarding this issue. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske speaks with two local Title IX officials about how they educate students and faculty, and investigate sexual assault allegations.

Guests:

An exploration of a decade of rape cases in Douglas County has revealed troubling information. Of the cases where heavy drinking had been involved and where the victim knew the accused, there were no convictions. Pleading down, or pleading guilty to a lesser crime, appears to have been a common outcome in those cases. The Lawrence-Journal World's Sara Shepherd shares insights from her reporting.

Guest:

It may seem counterintuitive, but officials at the University of Kansas say they’re pleased they saw an increase in the number of discrimination complaints in 2014.

The office that handles allegations of discrimination received 169 complaints last year. In 2013, that number was 85.

Jane McQueeny, director of the KU Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, says most of the complaints are under the category of Title IX violations. That's the federal law regulating sexual harassment and violence on campuses.

About a third of the complaint were rape allegations.

The University Of Kansas placed the Kappa Sigma fraternity on probation for two years on Wednesday because of violations of the Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities.

The sanctions are the result of an investigation of alleged sexual assault at the fraternity the weekend of Sept. 26.

According to a statement from the University, the sanctions against the Kappa Sigma fraternity include:

Native American women living on reservations suffer from some of the highest rates of violent crime, per capita, in the world. Yet tribal courts are often limited in their authority to address the issue. Sarah Deer, a KU Law alum with Muscogee roots, recently received a MacArthur grant for her efforts to bridge the gap between federal and tribal law, and to empower tribes to protect their women. 

Guest:

Wikimedia Commons

A constitutional amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot could change the way sexual crimes are prosecuted in Missouri.

Constitutional Amendment 2 would allow previous relevant criminal activities to be admissible in court for crimes of a sexual nature against a minor. 

Ballot language:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kan.,  Missouri Science and Technology in Rolla, Mo., Kansas State University, and Washburn University in Topeka, Kan., are all on a list of over 70 colleges and universities under investigation by the U.S. Department of Education for violations of sex discrimination.

Tristan Bowersox / Flickr, Creative Commons

California just passed a law establishing "yes means yes" as the statewide standard for consent, and President Obama recently issued a message to the nation calling assault on campus "an affront to our basic humanity." In the wake of some controversial local cases, where do local universities stand on this issue, and what are students saying?

Guests:

Yassie / Wikimedia-CC

Later this week, the University of Missouri Board of Curators will vote on a plan to change the way sexual assault and harassment complaints are handled.

But some faculty members say the process is moving forward a little too quickly.

University of Missouri system President Tim Wolfe is proposing a change that would require schools to investigate sexual harassment or discrimination cases within 60 days.

The proposal before the curators also would widen which employees must report harassment to the administration and change the hearing process.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Concerns about the way the University of Kansas handles sexual assault cases have been boiling over in recent weeks.

Reports of alleged sexual assaults garnering minor punishments have prompted protests and even a video produced by students telling others not to attend KU. Thursday night, university officials held a panel discussion where they answered questions, took suggestions and explained university policies surrounding sexual assault.

More than 100 people gathered for the discussion. Those who spoke expressed concerns about the process and suggested improvements.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The company that provided the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph its liability insurance in the 1970s says it shouldn't have to defend the church or pay damages in a litany of sexual abuse cases.

The U.S. Fidelity and Guaranty Co. filed suit in federal court Friday against the diocese, which has been sued by more than a dozen plaintiffs who say they were victims of sexual abuse in the '60s and '70s. In the majority of those cases, the court has dismissed all claims against the diocese except the intentional failure to supervise clergy.

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