Secret Service

Pete Souza / Wikimedia Commons

The Secret Service is getting a lot of flak these days for a series of recent security lapses.  On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a former White House advance man who has worked on thousands of advance trips in the U.S. and around the world for Presidents, Vice-Presidents, and First Ladies. They discuss working with the Secret Service and how presidential visits are planned. 

The shock of the Kennedy assassination stunned the nation, but it also sparked a massive review of how the Secret Service operated.

In the first part of Monday's Up to Date, we talk with Clint Hill, the Secret Service agent who protected Jackie Kennedy in Dallas and beyond, about his role that day and how it changed him and the agency watching out for the president.


A few of the latest developments in the so-called Secret Service scandal, which involves alleged cavorting with prostitutes by agents and U.S. military personnel in Cartagena, Colombia, earlier this month:

In his first public comments about the prostitution scandal that has engulfed the Secret Service, President Obama praised the agency and said those implicated in the scandal should not the diminish the work of everyone else.

"The Secret Service, these guys are incredible," Obama said according to Politico. "They protect me, they protect our girls... A couple of knuckleheads shouldn't detract from what they do."

"A member of the U.S. military assigned to the White House Communications Agency is under investigation in connection with alleged misconduct in Colombia, bringing to 12 the total number of military personnel being reviewed," CNN reports.

Within the next few days, several more Secret Service agents will lose their jobs because of their roles in the so-called summit scandal during which they allegedly cavorted with prostitutes in Colombia earlier this month, the chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security said this morning.

The Secret Service, which has been offering protection to presidents since 1902, has long enjoyed one of the most sterling reputations of any government agency.

That reputation has been tarnished by allegations that agents hired prostitutes in Colombia in advance of President Obama's trip there.

When shots rang out in Dallas, Secret Service agent Clint Hill jumped in the back of President John F. Kennedy’s car.