Roxy Paine

photo: Laura Spencer/KCUR

Acquiring new art for a museum's permanent collection can be a complex, and sometimes political process. When the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art found out they'd be able to keep three of New York-based artist Roxy Paine's Scumak sculptures, they decided to open up the decision to the public.

Kansas City, Mo. – Acquiring new art for a museum's permanent collection can be a complex, and sometimes political process.

photo: Laura Spencer/KCUR

The elaborately crafted Roxy Paine sculpture called Ferment resembles a 56-foot tall stainless steel tree. It's a new addition to the sculpture park at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. KCUR's Laura Spencer takes a look at the New York-based artist's connections to Kansas City and the two-week installation process.

photo: Laura Spencer/KCUR

Have you seen the gleaming silver "tree" that's twisting up from a rise in front of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art? The new sculpture called Ferment is almost 60 feet tall, the work of artist Roxy Paine. And it's inspired a new composition.