retirement

Ken Teegardin / Flickr - CC

The American family unit these days is way more varied than in decades past. Whether you're in a same-sex relationship, part of a cohabitating couple, or a senior who's just not interested in marriage, financial planning can present unique obstacles. Today, the Smart Money Experts are back with advice for non-traditional couples. They also discuss the latest financial headlines, including the growth in U.S.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

University of Missouri-Kansas City Chancellor Leo Morton on Tuesday announced he plans to retire from his position at the end of the next academic year.

Morton has served as chancellor since 2008. Prior to that appointment he was senior vice president and chief administrative officer for Aquila Inc. and also held positions at AT&T, General Motors and Corning Glass.

Dave Dugdale / Flickr - CC

Several factors influence a person's financial health: age, career choice, dependents ... but gender? According to a 2016 report by Financial Finesse, a firm that manages financial wellness programs for employers, women are not as financially secure in the long-term when compared to their male counterparts, especially among millennials. Today, the Smart Money Experts discuss methods of closing that gap and suggest budget workouts to help achieve fiscal fitness.

401(K) 2012 / Flickr - CC

Whether or not you enjoy your career, you likely plan on permanently leaving the workforce at some point. With longer life expectancy rates, and shrinking stability in government pension programs, hopeful retirees are right to be concerned about the financial viability of doing so. Today, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts detail pragmatic planning tactics and crisis control for those currently in danger of outliving their assets.

National Weather Service Pleasant Hill Kansas City/Pleasant Hill / Facebook

"For those wishing for an oak mite apocalypse, you'll get your wish Sunday morning (11/20) when lows hit the mid-20s."

This quip was posted on the National Weather Service's Facebook page last autumn by Forecaster Mike July. Some people have a knack for knowing exactly what an audience is looking for in a weather forecast. For many, July is one of those people.

courtesy: Paul Andrews

Mesner Puppet Theater announced leadership changes to the organization Tuesday.

Founder Paul Mesner will be handing over the reins as artistic director to longtime puppeteer and associate artistic director Mike Horner. The company has also created the new position of Education Director, and artist, set designer and director Alex Espy will be taking on that role. 

When you make the jump into retirement, what will catch you? On this edition of Up to Date, the Smart Money Experts discuss the long-term prospects of Social Security and Medicare and how to prepare for an uncertain future. We also take a look at cyber-security and protecting your personal information in the digital era.

Guests:

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Two more former high-ranking members of the St. Joseph School District have repaid tens of thousands of dollars to the Missouri state retirement system after it was discovered they inflated their incomes.

The Public School Retirement System (PSRS) has confirmed that Mark Hargens has repaid $90,000 and former superintendent Melody Smith has repaid $23,000.

Baby Boomers are aging and as they retire, challenges like financial concerns and health issues loom ahead. And as one generation begins to slow down, how can their younger counterparts harness their collective knowledge and expertise?

Guest:

Inspired by KCUR's series, When I'm 64, we examine the future of retirement. Will it still be around for future generations, or will it become something entirely different?

Guests:

When I'm 64: Peggy Pape

Apr 13, 2016
Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Peggy Pape

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Office manager at Parkville Presbyterian Church for 26 years

When I'm 64: Sly James

Apr 13, 2016
Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Sly James

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Mayor

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Marc Inzerillo

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Jon R. Gray

Residence: Kansas City, Missouri

Occupation: Lawyer for Shook, Hardy & Bacon

What does 64 feel like? “Feels great. It beats the alternative. The alternative would be to not be 64 and be dead somewhere. What I can honestly say is I am truly living the best time of my life.”

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

This profile is part of KCUR’s occasional series, Aging in Place. We’re showcasing the many different faces of 64 in metro Kansas City. 

Name: Linda Salvay

Residence: Overland Park, Kansas

Occupation: “I’m discovering my next career as we speak because for most of my career I’ve been in corporate communications and recently left that. I’m trying to make a career about all the other things I love to do but didn’t have time for.”

Courtest Photo / Blooom

It’s been a big year for Blooom, the Leawood, Kansas, based finance-tech company.

In addition to taking home a $50,000 grant from LaunchKC during Techweek in September, the company has just been crowned the first-ever winner of the "One in a Million" startup competition, presented by the Kauffman Foundation's 1 Million Cups program.

The grand prize — $10,000.

Alex Smith / KCUR

The older you get, the more complicated and expensive health care becomes. A study from the National Institutes of Health shows that half the money that’s spent on Americans’ health is spent on care after age 65.

That’s why changes to the health system – like the Affordable Care Act and Medicare reform — can be especially concerning to older people.

ulrichkarljoho / Flickr - CC

Even if we try to deny it, we can't escape getting older. Almost three-fourths of people who reach the age of 65 are going to need some kind of long-term care. So why is it that so few of us plan for those needs?

On Monday's Central Standard, Bill Anderson and the Cash Money Crew talk about how to prepare finances for old age and the possibility of needing long-term care. Plus, they explore the poor health of the long-term care insurance industry. 

Guests:

Ray Meints / NET News

Working beyond retirement is a fairly common refrain these days. In 2012, 5 percent of the U.S. workforce was beyond retirement age. But farmers seem to work longer than most. In the last Agriculture Census 25 percent of all farm operators were over 65 years old.

Why do farmers keep working? For one thing, modern machinery makes it easier to work longer.

“It’s more you use your mind rather than your back, so you can go longer,” said Mike Duffy, an agricultural economist at Iowa State University.

Financial Advice: Thirty Days Until Retirement

Aug 17, 2012
Stephen Depolo / Flickr

It’s estimated that half of America's middle-class workers will be poor or near poor come retirement. Many will find themselves living a $5 a day food budget.

With the first of the Baby Boom generation reaching the milestone of mid-life, the number of Americans in or nearing retirement age is both unprecedented and expanding.