railroads

Danny Wood / for KCUR

Rail hobbyist, Jeff Van Leuvan is on the pedestrian bridge at Kansas City’s Union Station watching the trains.

“This is a Union Pacific train. It is a coal train and it is probably going toward the St. Louis area,” he comments as another train passes by. Van Leuvan says you can watch up to 120 freight trains pass by this bridge daily.

A new railroad bridge over the Osage River between St. Louis and Jefferson City is now open for both passenger and freight train use.

The new bridge cost $28 million, with most of the funds coming from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Federal Railroad Administrator Joe Szabo says the project came in under budget and ahead of schedule.

“We now have double-track running the entire stretch from Jefferson City to St. Louis, and delays caused by rail traffic funneling into a single track over the old bridge are now a thing of the past,” said Szabo.

The Chairman of Kansas City’s Regional Transit Alliance fears  a proposed medical research tax will divert funds and attention from improved rail transportation.   The stand does not extend to  active opposition  to the tax.

Kite Singleton of the Transit Alliance makes it clear he is not campaigning against the half cent medical research tax going on the Jackson County ballot in November.

From Steam To Diesel To . . . Natural Gas?

Mar 10, 2013
en.wikipedia.org

In the history of the locomotive, natural gas may prove to be as game-changing to the railroad industry in this century as diesel was in the last.  

America’s love affair with the railroad spans more than a century … with some of its most ardent admirers here in the heartland.

One of them, developer Arthur Stilwell had a hunch that the Kansas City region had enormous commercial potential.  Luckily for him … and for us … he was right.  The plan Stilwell pursued changed our city’s business landscape forever.