Racism

The creator and editor-in-chief of MuslimGirl.com talks about the challenges facing Muslim women in the wake of Donald Trump's election. Then we examine the soundtrack of the Vietnam War, and listen to some of the songs that helped American troops get through the conflict.

A fraternity at MU has been suspended after members allegedly yelled racial slurs at black students in front of their fraternity house Tuesday night.

Administrators responded Wednesday afternoon by temporarily suspending the Delta Upsilon Fraternity. The university is also investigating the students involved in the incident to determine whether any individuals should also be punished. 

The confrontation came nearly a year after the MU campus erupted in protest over a similar incident, resulting in the resignation of the university system president.

This post will be updated as new information becomes available.

 

 

Two black women at the University of Missouri say they were called a racial slur during a confrontation with white students outside the Delta Upsilon fraternity house Tuesday night. 

 

According to a statement from the university's Legion of Black Collegians, a group of white students passed the two women and a member of the group called the women a racial slur. Members of the legion and university police were arriving to assess the situation when the statement says members of the Delta Upsilon fraternity began recording interactions between the police and black students while shouting slurs and obscenities.
Lindsborg Police Department

A man involved in a racist incident at a rural Kansas college has been trying to gain a foothold in state politics.

The chalk outlines of bodies and messages including, “Make Lindsborg White Again," scrawled on Bethany College sidewalks earlier this month rattled the campus and surrounding community

A police report of the chalkings from Sept. 3 names Gabriel James Wilson as a suspect.

TPPatriots / YouTube

The primary contest for Missouri Attorney General between Republicans Josh Hawley and Kurt Schafer has already been nasty, but some groups are saying a recent anti-Schaeffer commercial crosses a line.

A coalition of Asian-American groups, including the Asian American Chamber of Commerce of St. Louis, OCA St. Louis, the Missouri Asian American Bar Association, and the Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City, joined to condemn the ad. 

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR 89.3

Amidst rising tensions between law enforcement and communities of color across the nation, Black Lives Matter supporters joined forces with the Wichita Police for a cookout last weekend. What was originally planned as a protest turned into a picnic, where over 1,000 community members came together for food and dance.

What does it mean to be a white person who wants a place in the Black Lives Matter movement? Some say it starts by acknowledging you’re white. We talk about how to be what activists call ‘white allies.’

Guests:

Paper dolls have been popular toys for children for centuries, but the black versions of these toys often depict racial stereotypes that reflect how society viewed African Americans. 

Guest:

Tom Porto

A 24-year-old Mexican American man has filed an excessive force lawsuit against three Kansas City police officers, alleging assault, battery and conspiracy during an arrest caught on police dash-cam video.

The Kansas City Police Department is investigating the May 2, 2014, arrest of Manuel Palacio as a criminal case of police misconduct.  

The nearly 19-minute video shows a surprised Palacio, who was walking down Independence Ave., at Cypress, being rammed with a police cruiser and knocked to the ground.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

The University of Missouri-Columbia made national headlines over the past few weeks amidst rising racial tensions and resulting protests on campus.

As the conversation unfolded, a handful of terms have taken the spotlight online and in the media. Like safe space, systematic oppression and the First Amendment, to name a few.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Leaders of the Student Senate at the University of Kansas made the case to keep their jobs Wednesday night, but the impeachment process is now underway.

The turmoil is in response to claims of racism and discrimination at KU. The Executive Committee of the Senate called for the president, vice president and chief of staff to resign or face possible impeachment.

Student Body President Jessie Pringle told the Senate that she would stay in her post.

As students at the University of Missouri continue their drive to improve the racial culture in Columbia, UMKC students are eager to shine a light on concerns in Kansas City and push for changes that would improve racial tensions.  

Guests:

University of Missouri System

The University of Missouri Board of Curators announced Thursday that Michael Middleton will serve as interim president of the UM System.

Middleton served as the deputy chancellor of MU for 17 years before retiring in August. He was appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court last month to co-chair the Commission on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in state courts. He also served as a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

The first few days of this week brought the resignation of both the University of Missouri President, Tim Wolfe, and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin in Columbia — and those events left staff and students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City asking questions about the racial climate on their campus.

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resigned this morning amid pressure from the football team and building racial tensions on the Mizzou campus. We hear Wolfe's remarks from this morning and discuss what led to his resignation. 

Guests:

davidroediger.org

What does it mean to be white? Can we have a discussion about race without talking about whiteness? KU history professor David Roediger, a leading national scholar in "white studies," joins us to discuss his work.

Guest:

  • David R. Roediger, Professor of History and American Studies, University of Kansas
Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Slavery along the Missouri River in what is now the Kansas City metro area was not the slavery of Gone With The Wind.

University of Missouri-Kansas City history professor Diane Mutti-Burke, who has written extensively about slavery in Missouri, says slave owners tended to have less than 20 slaves. Those with more than 20 are historically defined as "plantations."

From the Not My Ozarks Facebook page

Rachel Luster wasn’t happy when news started showing up in her social media feeds that the Ku Klux Klan wanted to train “the first recruits… in a mighty army” in her part of the Ozarks.

Just 80 years ago, the word racism barely existed. How did it — along the word racist — become such loaded terms? We invite a New York Times reporter, the president of the Urban League and a professor of linguistics and sociocultural anthropology to discuss how we talk about racism today — and the power of those two words.

Guests:

After nearly 120 years, jockey Issac Burns Murphy's winning record is still the highest in American horse racing history.  Though he won three Kentucky Derbies and set numerous records throughout his career, Murphy had to deal with the harsh reality of being black in the still deeply segregated South.

On this edition of Up to Date Pellom McDaniels III talks with Steve Kraske about his new biography of "The Prince of Jockeys" whose life and career spanned the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow.

Missouri Valley Special Collections / Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri

Eds note: This look at the Troost corridor is  part of KCUR's months-long examination of how geographic borders affect our daily lives in Kansas City. KCUR will go Beyond Our Borders and spark a community conversation through social outreach and innovative journalism. 

We will share the history of these lines, how the borders affect the current Kansas City experience and what’s being done to bridge or dissolve them. 

Blood Done Sign My Name

Mar 15, 2012

In 1970, a young black man was senselessly beaten and murdered by a group of white store owners in Oxford, North Carolina.