protests

SURJ KC / Facebook

Alice Chamberlain admits it's often uncomfortable for white people to talk about prejudice, white privilege and institutional racism.

That's why she's excited. 

On Monday, more than 300 people — most of them white, like her  — showed up at St. Mark Hope and Peace Lutheran Church in Kansas City to have a conversation about just those topics. 

Activated

Mar 9, 2016

The protests at Mizzou last fall felt like game-changers for the overall visibility and power of student activism. What's the state of campus activism today? Plus, the history of campus protests, starting with objections to rancid butter in the 1770s.

Guests:

  • Storm Ervin, demonstrator, Concerned Students at The University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Angus Johnson, teacher and researcher, The City University of New York
The Los Angeles Times / Creative Commons

There's a federal surveillance file from the early 20th century that refers to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in Kansas during World War I as a "University of Radicalism."

"That's not hyperbole," said researcher Christina Heatherton of Trinity College in Connecticut during a conversation on Central Standard

Heatherton was writing a book on the Mexican Revolution.

UPDATE (5:30 pm): Late Tuesday afternoon, MU Communications professor Melissa Click released a statement apologizing for her "language and strategies" in confronting reporters on Carnahan Quad on the Mizzou campus. 

"[I] sincerely apologize to the MU campus community, and journalists at large, for my behavior, and also for the way my actions have shifted attention away from the students' campaign for justice. From this experience I have learned about humanity and humility." 

In the immediate aftermath of Monday's events at the University of Missouri's Columbia campus, other local universities have taken notice — campus leadership needs to listen to student and faculty voice.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City is starting that process now, mere hours after both UM System President Tim Wolfe and MU Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin resigned, chastened by student-led protests and faculty complaints that they were insensitive to a tense and frequently racist campus climate. 

Stand Up KC

The Kansas City Council passed an ordinance earlier this summer that would've raised the city's minimum wage to $13 an hour by 2020. And while the move was praised by social justice organizations and workers, many business groups felt it was done too quickly.

In the weeks since then, a lot has changed with the minimum wage debate in Kansas City. Competing initiatives, an election and state law have all converged into a confusing mess.

To straighten out the tangle of procedures and petitions, KCUR has put together a timeline of the major developments surrounding the minimum wage. This isn't an exhaustive list, but it is our best effort to compile the significant dates and moments in the minimum wage conversation in Kansas City.

  Whether it's the growing wealth gap in this country or the devastation done to the environment, journalist Chris Hedges believes the United States is primed for a revolutionary moment. On this edition of Up To Date, he talks about the factors that lead to rebellion.

Cody Newill / KCUR

Dozens of low-wage workers rallied Thursday outside the McDonald's at 3741 Broadway in Kansas City to protest a recent decision by the fast-food giant to raise wages for some workers.

McDonald's is raising wages by at least a dollar for about 90,000 employees in corporate-owned restaurants. That means employees working in franchised restaurants won't get a raise unless franchise owners follow suit.

Stand Up KC

More than 200 activists marched in Kansas City, Mo., Saturday on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights March through Selma, Ala.

The march was organized by Stand Up KC and the Metro Organization for Racial and Economic Equity. Most of the protestors were fast-food workers who are calling for $15 an hour wages and union representation. 

Terrance Wise has worked for Burger King for more than 10 years. He believes that corporations are slowly warming up to raising wages for workers.

Cody Newill / KCUR

Seven people involved in a protest in downtown Kansas City, Mo., on Saturday were arrested as they attempted to block Interstate 70.

The protest was themed #BlackLivesMatter after the viral hashtag, which took off after the decisions not to indict the police officers involved in the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.

Willis Ryder Arnold / St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday night, the people of Ferguson, Mo., learned that the white police officer who shot and killed a black teenager in August would not be indicted. After a period of stunned silence, chaos erupted between protestors and police, who showed up on the scene before violence broke out. How do residents feel, faced with immediate struggles and a national spotlight? Is it possible for the events in Ferguson to give rise to a new chapter in the history of race and justice in America?

Guests:

Frank Morris / KCUR

Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered the National Guard to help restore order in Ferguson, Mo., as protests and sometimes violent confrontations continue.

KCUR's Frank Morris is reporting from Ferguson, and talked with us about his experience there.

Interview highlights:

On whether media coverage has accurately reflected the reality in Ferguson

The community response to the death of unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Mo. has varied from rioting and looting to peaceful protests and calls for civil discourse. Is there a way of responding to police shootings that can effect personal, social, or political change?

Guests:

cannabisdestiny / Flickr-CC

John Denver’s “Rocky Mountain High” is Colorado’s state song, and the marijuana legalization law that went into effect this year might be what the late musician had in mind.

On Thursday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors return to discuss the problems that surround marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law, but increasingly accepted in many states. Also on their slate is a look at anti-government protests in Ukraine and Thailand.

Guests:

National Socialist Movement Rally At U.S. Capitol - Wikipedia / Google Images -- CC

The National Socialist Movement has scheduled a rally November 9 in Kansas City at the Jackson County Courthouse. The group calls itself a white civil rights organization, whereas watchdog organizations uniformly call it a hate group that is racist, anti-Semitic and dangerous.

Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center says that extremist groups have been growing since the start of the recession in 2008. He claims that in 2008 there were 149 extremist groups, whereas as currently there are over 1000. 

Grandmothers Against Gun Violence/Facebook

In the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School and Washington Navy Yard shootings, many find themselves questioning the use of guns in society. 

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with a Cape Cod grandma who wants to change the dialogue on gun violence in this country. She joins Steve Kraske to discuss her plan to encourage accountability and responsibility while finding common ground with gun owners. 

Guests:

From Brazil to England, from Morocco to Paraguay, May Day protests are on their way.

Here in the United States we're seeing protests in both coasts from New York to Los Angeles.

Here's how The Wall Street Journal set up the protests in Manhattan: