privacy

This week, 655,000 medical records from three healthcare organizations, including one in Farmington, Missouri, were listed for sale on the "Darknet." As we hear of more and more big data breaches, what does this mean for individuals? And what’s the market for stolen health information?

Guests:

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

Guests:

Area journalists are largely behind a push to end a loophole in Kansas that allows emails discussing  public affairs— but sent from a private account— to be exempt from open records laws.  The effort is beginning to gain traction in the legislature. 

Guest:

  • Karen Dillon is an investigative reporter for the Lawrence Journal-World.

Fill out a warranty card . . . sign up for a rewards program . . . apply for a marriage license and somewhere there’s a company compiling the information you provided for profit.  Whether it’s a retailer looking to target its advertising or a business looking to sell aggregated information about you, many of the personal details of your life are no longer private.

Ken Banks / Flickr-CC

A measure on the Aug. 5 primary ballot in Missouri seeks to amend the state constitution to protect data and electronic communications from unreasonable search and seizure. 

Ballot language

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended so that the people shall be secure in their electronic communications and data from unreasonable searches and seizures as they are now likewise secure in their persons, homes, papers and effects?

State and local governmental entities expect no significant costs or savings.

Chris Samuel / Flickr -- Creative Commons

Right now our government is mining data about your conversations--who you called, when you called them, how long you talked, and who you’ve emailed. It’s all technically approved by law, but for many it’s deeply unsettling.

On this Central Standard we take a step backward and inward from the controversy surrounding domestic surveillance and look at the psychology of secrets and privacy with psychologist Bruce Liese.

Perhaps in an effort to put an end to an ongoing political battle over the practice, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation blocking the state Department of Revenue from scanning and storing documents required to get a driver's license.

Terry Robinson/Flickr-CC

Should the government be able to access your telephone records? Are the actions of the NSA any worse than companies like Google that constantly mine our information? 

On Thursday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors, Wayne Vaught and Clancy Martin, join Steve Kraske to discuss what boundaries the government has crossed and where to draw the line. They also explore the gray area of immigration reform.  

Whether you're searching online for the best shoe sales or driving directions, chances are good that the first thing you do is "Google it." And why wouldn't you? With its recent foray into social media and services offering everything from out-of-print books to cell phones, Google is fast becoming a one-stop shop for, well, everything. But could the search engine be too good at what it does?