pregnancy

Jim McLean / Heartland Health Monitor

Sarah Lockridge thinks hospitals are where you go when you’re sick, not where mothers-to-be should go to bring their babies into the world.

That’s why she decided to have her first baby at a birth center in Kansas City, Kansas, under the care of a certified midwife.

At first, Lockridge says, her family questioned her decision.

“When you say I’m using a midwife, I’m not going to a hospital the first thing that comes into their brain is that you’re going to be in a mud hut in the woods somewhere,” she says.

Creative Commons-Pixabay

Editor’s note: This is the second of two stories examining the costs of early scheduled births in Kansas and efforts to reduce them. 

A statewide efficiency report estimates Kansas could save nearly $20 million over five years by reducing early elective Medicaid births — a number that might require the state to prevent 800 more of those births than actually happened in the most recent year.

Creative Commons-Pixabay

Editor’s note: This is the first of two stories examining the costs of early scheduled births in Kansas and efforts to reduce them. 

The practice of delivering babies a few days early for the convenience of mothers and doctors has been a common one for years at hospitals across the country and in Kansas.

But when research established that deliveries done even a little ahead of schedule can threaten the health of newborns, Kansas health care providers decided it was time to end the practice.

Becoming pregnant and giving birth is a joyous time for many women. And yet, many suffer from serious depression during pregnancy and after birth. Now, the federal government is recommending that pregnant women and new mothers get screened for depression.

Guests:

  • Kim Vandegeest-Wallace is a psychologist and sex therapist with the Women’s Specialty Clinic at KU Med.
  • Jane McKinney a licensed social worker with the Lakewood Counseling Service.

Nineteen-year-old Claudia Rivera shares a single-story tract home in Liberal, Kansas, with her boyfriend, 20-year-old Jesùs Varela.

Last month, Varela’s mother moved in so she could watch Rivera’s baby boy, Fabian, while Rivera works at the Dollar General store and Valera pulls down a shift at the local meatpacking plant.

www.nationalpartnership.org

It's scary being a new parent, and many state regulations make the adjustment period very difficult for new moms and dads who have jobs. A recent study gives both Kansas and Missouri a failing grade in this area.

Rchristie/Flickr-CC

It wasn’t until the second half of the 20th century that expectant parents could see and hear their baby through means of ultrasound and Doppler. With those advances also came a dramatic change in how we view early pregnancy loss.

In the first part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with a historian of women’s health about the impact of technology on first trimester miscarriages and how what was once considered an abnormal period is now the lossof a baby.

Premature Births Decline In Kansas City

Jun 8, 2010

Kansas City, Mo. – More babies are making it to the full nine-month term in Kansas City. But experts aren't sure why.

Between 1990 and 2006, the rate of pre-term births escalated in Kansas City and around the country. A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that rates are now starting to finally go down.

The pre-term birth rate in Kansas City, Missouri dropped by almost two percentage points between 2005 and 2008.