politics

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Steve Glorioso, a political operative known and respected by officials and movers and shakers of every political stripe, died Thursday night, according to The Kansas City Star.  He was 70 years old.

Mayor Sly James said Glorioso was dedicated to improving Kansas City throughout his long career.

Former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack is questioning the qualifications of President Trump’s pick to lead the research division at the USDA, a post generally held in the past by a trained scientist.

In July, Trump nominated former conservative talk radio host and economics professor Sam Clovis to be the agency’s undersecretary of agriculture for research, education and economics.

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The definition of an American family is no longer a man and his wife, living in suburbia with their 2.3 kids. Today, we learn about some of the economic forces reshaping families. Then, we explore the history of sandlot baseball in Kansas City, and find out how communities are trying to revive the tradition. Later, we discuss the controversy over Democratic Missouri Sen.

As President Donald Trump continues to fill political appointments, his nomination for the top science job at the U.S. Department of Agriculture is raising unique concerns.

Trump has chosen Iowan Sam Clovis to be undersecretary of agriculture for research, education and economics. Clovis served as a fighter pilot in the Air Force, has a doctorate in public administration, and taught economics at Morningside College in Sioux City.

Sioux City is also where he gained a following as a conservative talk show host.

Jen Chen / KCUR 89.3

Last fall, after he was laid off from The Kansas City Star, Yael Abouhalkah did what many journalists do: he started a blog and continued to cover local and national politics.

That is, until couple of weeks ago, when he announced that he and his wife are heading to Namibia to be Peace Corps volunteers.

They’re leaving mid-August for a 27-month stint in southwest Africa.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

While controversy surrounding the president's opposition research has been hogging headlines recently, the practice of digging up dirt on an opponent is as old as politics. In fact, today's first guests, consultants John Hancock and Michael Kelley, say it's essential to a successful campaign.

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Starting with his own passion for homeownership, friends say James B. Nutter left his mark on Kansas City in the fields of business, politics and philanthropy.

Friends and family will gather Thursday for Nutter's funeral. The founder and owner of the lending firm that bears his name died July 7 at the age of 89.

Missouri Democratic Party Leader Looks To Rebuild

Jul 7, 2017
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Democrats across the country suffered bruising electoral defeats in November 2016. Now, Missouri Democrats are looking to the 2018 elections and trying to rebuild.

Stephen Webber, who has chaired the Missouri Democratic Party since last year, is coming up with a plan he thinks could combat the issues that plagued his party last time around. Webber was elected to lead after losing a narrow fall race for Missouri Senate District 19 to Republican Caleb Rowden. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Urban parts of Kansas City have seen a rapid increase in apartment building, and the trend isn't expected to change anytime soon. Today, we find out what's behind the boom and see how it might change the metro. Then, Missouri Democratic Party Chairman Stephen Webber discusses the future of his party, and his plans to reverse recent troubles at the ballot box.

Charvex / Wikipedia Commons

The J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain is named after a man who did great things for Kansas City. However, his achievements were accompanied by racist beliefs and policies that still divide us. Today, the Ethics Professors discuss whether we should rename monuments that honor historic figures whose standards don't pass contemporary moral muster. Then, we explore the gray area of political free speech for public educators.

CAROLINA HIDALGO / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Governor Eric Greitens had a busy afternoon last Friday, June 30. He signed a major change to employment law, making it much harder for a fired employee to prove a discrimination case. He vetoed a bipartisan compromise that would have preserved a tax credit for low-income seniors and disabled people. And he signed the state budget—while also withholding more than $250 million in spending. Host Brian Ellison talks with KCUR's Kyle Palmer to catch you up on the political news of the weekend and give you an update on what might come next out of Missouri's Capitol.

Tomorrow is Independence Day, which makes us think . . . what's more American than voting? Back on Election Day, we took a trip down memory lane to the first elections many of us got to participate in: class elections. From elementary school to college, these early elections were an opportunity to practice being members of a democracy.

Join us for this encore episode of Central Standard

Guests:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

The same group of elderly white men meet every morning at 6 a.m. at Fubbler’s Cove diner on Front Street in Orrick, Missouri. And pretty much every day they discuss the usual stuff: the weather, the crops, etc.

On a recent warm spring day, I dropped in to ask for their opinions on how they think national politics affects them.

“You probably don’t want to hear,” said one, who asked that I not use his name.

These guys disagree all the time – about everything from the new mayor to the food.  But it doesn’t get in the way of their daily coffee and conversation.

Phil Roeder / Flickr - CC

Drawing voting districts to favor one party or another, a process known as gerrymandering, is widely considered a key factor behind the country's intensely partisan climate. Today, we discuss the practice of "packing and cracking" in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's announcement this week to take up the issue.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Jim Barnett is throwing his stethoscope into the ring.

Again.

The 63-year-old doctor and former state senator is running for the Republican nomination for governor.

Again.

Barnett, who represented an Emporia-centered district in the Kansas Senate for a decade, won the 2006 GOP primary over a relatively weak field but lost to incumbent Democratic Gov. Kathleen Sebelius in the general election.

Four years later he came up short in a race against Tim Huelskamp for the Republican nomination in the 1st Congressional District.

Warren K. Lefler / Library of Congress

In the years following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, his brother Robert forged a path of his own on the political front. Today, we discuss the pivotal years of Bobby Kennedy's life as he grappled with the past  while working toward a future of his own.

A new hospital, financed by a USDA loan, is under construction in Syracuese, Nebraska, a town of under 2,000 people.
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

President Donald Trump spent the campaign pledging to revive rural communities, where many voters have felt ignored by previous administrations. But after announcing staffing changes and budget plans that would make cuts to programs aimed at rural areas, critics are questioning whether the White House remains committed to that goal.

Marleah Campbell / KCUR 89.3

Television has rapidly evolved since its humble, black-and-white beginnings. Today, we discuss how  TV has forever changed the American culture. Then, actress and activist Morgan Fairchild joins us to discuss her advocacy work and insights on current events and politics.

Davin Watne

Walk into Haw Contemporary in the Stockyards district of the West Bottoms, and in one gallery, artist Davin Watne has built a 30-foot long wall. There are nearly 40 paintings in a collage — small and large, clamped together — stretching the length of the room.

The exhibition, Picture the Wall, is, in part, an artistic response to Donald Trump’ s call for a wall along the U.S. and Mexico border during the 2016 presidential campaign. And it carries on a long tradition of, as Watne puts it, "oil on canvas as a means to convince" the public. 

Richard Nixon Presidential Library

Before President Donald Trump's thin-skinned, media-obsessed administration over a country deeply divided, there was Richard M. Nixon. Historian John A. Farrell's new biography includes astonishing revelations about the 37th president that have some drawing political parallels to the current chief executive.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For many people, it is a career change, a promotion, or maybe an industry award that propels their professional life to the next level.

For Tom Toro, it was the first time he sold a cartoon to The New Yorker.

"It happened in a very modern way," says Toro. "My life changed via email."

It seems like a somewhat underwhelming email. The subject line, Toro says, read simply, 'Okay.'

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Renowned historian David McCullough has produced many books and speeches that touch on the country's stories and accomplishments. In a new collection, he samples those words to remind readers of The American Spirit. Then, Kansas City cartoonist Tom Toro shares his approach to successfully churning out editorial satire.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

There have been some hits and some misses during President Donald Trump's first 100 days in office. One thing everyone agrees on is there has been no shortage of surprises. Today, we hear from a distinguished panel of political observers; ABC News analyst Matthew Dowd, Time magazine editor-at-large David Von Drehle, and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial writer Colleen Nelson, of the Kansas City Star. They discuss the early days of the new executive administration.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

Alexander Heffner thinks a lot about how to get millennials engaged in politics. Perhaps because he is one himself. Today, the host of PBS' The Open Mind, talks about framing old policy arguments in new ways and whether the media is fulfilling its civic duty. Then, we learn about the life of a Kansas City mermaid who — gasp! — doesn't like seafood!

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Every city has that one bookstore, the irreverent corner shop where literary types plot revolutions. In Kansas City, that bookstore is Prospero's, owned by Will Leathem. Leathem took a surprising path to becoming a used book salesman.

 

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A Nation Engaged: Power And The Presidency

Apr 27, 2017
Roy Inman / KCUR 89.3

As President Trump approaches the 100-day milestone of his administration, KCUR teamed up with NPR's for the latest A Nation Engaged conversation, moderated by Up To Date host Steve Kraske and NPR's Southwest correspondent, John Burnett. This time, we asked Kansas City-area citizens how much power they think an American president should be able to wield.

The nation has a new agriculture secretary.

The U.S. Senate on Monday voted to confirm former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to lead the Department of Agriculture. He takes over a department that was without a top boss for three months after former secretary Tom Vilsack resigned. Vilsack served the entire eight years of the Obama administration (one of the longest-serving agriculture secretaries in recent decades).

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When their spring adjournment ends, Kansas state lawmakers will look to resolve a $1 billion budget gap, adopt a school funding plan, modify taxes, and maybe even vote on Medicaid expansion — again.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. with Kansas City Star receiving comment from Chambers — Missouri state Sen. Rob Schaaf has his hands in a lot of important legislation this session, yet he’s still made time to criticize Republican Gov. Eric Greitens over his new nonprofit.

A New Missouri Inc., which isn’t beholden to campaign finance laws and doesn’t have to disclose its donors, is fighting back, publishing a digital ad this week that says the St. Joseph Republican is “siding with liberals” and “playing personal political games.”

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From attempts to overturn Obamacare to rumors of sweeping tax reform, there's plenty going on in the federal Capitol these days — not to mention the White House. Today, Democrat Emanuel Cleaver, of Missouri, and Kansas' Republican Kevin Yoder, both U.S. representatives, discuss the issues congress is grappling with now and will likely deal with in the near future. They also share their thoughts on President Donald Trump's first 88 days in office.

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