oil

Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoman Collection / Doubleday

Even suave people blunder a bit here and there, but research suggests those weird traits have some advantages. Today, we look at the science behind social awkwardness. Then, we learn how vast new oil wealth among Oklahoma's Osage tribe engendered a heart-rending greed that led to a series of murders in the 1920s, and helped the fledgling FBI make a name for itself.

Sarah Craig/Faces of Fracking / Flickr - CC

While scientists have gained a clearer understanding of what's causing recent earthquakes in the Great Plains, they haven't reached a point where people can let their guard down. That's according to Heather DeShon, associate professor and seismologist at Southern Methodist University.

"The earthquakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas ... have been linked to a process called wastewater injection," she says.

In that process, large volumes of salty, briny water are deposited into cavities in deep rock layers, says DeShon.

Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr Creative Commons

Earthquakes in the Central U.S. have been steadily increasing due to oil production, gas extraction and disposal of wastewater. Seismologist Heather DeShon tells us if it is possible to mitigate the number of occurrences. Then, finding political common ground between parties. Mark Gerzon, president of the Mediators Foundation, explores cross-party cooperation in his most recent book, The Reunited States of America.

Sam Valadi / Flickr - CC

As the Dow Jones Industrial Average edges closer to 20,000 points, the Smart Money Experts share advice on how to respond to record highs in all three major stock indices.

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Last week's election left one notorious glass ceiling intact. So what does that mean for local women, and women in government?

Plus, it's National Day of Action against the Dakota Access Pipeline. How might the proposed North Dakota pipeline impact our indigenous communities, and general populous, here in Kansas City?

Guests:

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Hundreds of people, many of Native American heritage, gathered at Berkley Riverfront Park on Sunday to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.  

They joined protesters across the country standing in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe of North Dakota. The tribe filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for violating the National Historic Preservation Act, after the agency issued final permits for a massive crude oil pipeline stretching from North Dakota to Illinois.

Increased oil production in America and greater demand to move petroleum across the continent has increased the risk of devastating accidents, like the 2013 explosion in Quebec that took 47 lives. We explore what makes these “rolling pipelines” so dangerous and what’s being done to minimize that risk.

Guests:

Earthquakes are more frequent than ever in Oklahoma, and they're hitting harder. KCUR's Frank Morris visits Kansas's neighbor to the South and gets perspectives and stories from those directly affected by the situation. Is the cornerstone of that state's economy shaking its foundation?

Oil And America's Foreign Relations

Jul 15, 2013
Jay Hakes / JayHakes.com

 America has had a long and complicated history with foreign oil, with a specific impact on our political relationships abroad.

Tuesday on Up To Date, we're joined by Jay Hakes to discuss the role that oil has played in our foreign relations. He’s an energy analyst and director of the Carter Presidential Library and Museum and the author of a book about what freedom from foreign oil can do for our country. 

Gas & Oil Exploration In Kansas

Jan 29, 2013
David R. Tribble

PLEASE NOTE: This show was recorded on January 14.

The oil and gas industry is seeing a slew of booms all over the country—in North Dakota, Texas, and now in southern Kansas. The key: How much can be retrieved from something called the Mississippi Line Formation in south-central Kansas.

More hospitals in Missouri are giving away care, and oil and gas companies insist they pay their fair share of taxes in Kansas.  It's a daily digest of headlines from KCUR.