nutrition

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

Most school districts have moved to comply with stricter nutrition standards since the U.S. Department of Agriculture imposed them almost four years ago. 

But many still lack kitchen equipment necessary to make the healthier school breakfasts and lunches appealing.

Mike Sherry / Heartland Health Monitor

Local food advocates say a bill approved by Kansas lawmakers that restricts the authority of cities, counties and school districts to regulate junk food no longer constitutes a threat to their efforts to expand access to fresh fruits and vegetables.

They were plenty concerned in March when the House passed House Bill 2595.

Courtesy Iola Unified School District 257

Delivering meals to low-income people is a long-standing way to improve nutrition, but a project in Iola Unified School District 257 will bring the whole diner.

Kathy Koehn, nutrition and wellness coordinator at USD 257, said students taking vocational classes in the district are working to remodel an older school bus as a “traveling bistro” where children who may not have access to healthy food during the summer can get lunch.

Julien Menichini / Creative Commons-Flickr

Editor’s note: This story was updated at 4:41 p.m. Friday. 

The Kansas House on Friday approved a bill to prohibit city, county and school district officials from adopting certain types of healthy food policies.

The bill — House Bill 2595 — passed 89-34. It now goes to the Senate. 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

If soup is the answer to your cold weather woes, you're not alone. A doctor explains why soup makes us feel better, then our critics guide us to the best soups and stews in town, including insights into the new ramen craze. Bonus: what's new and noteworthy in the Kansas City restaurant scene? Our critics let us in on the people and places to watch right now.

Guests:

Poison in your mouthwash? Roach killer in your coffee? On this edition of Up To Date, we discuss some of the ingredients in everyday products that may surprise you. 

Guest:

  • Patrick Di Justo is a former editor at WIRED and author of This Is What You Just Put In Your Mouth? From Eggnog to Beef Jerky, the Surprising Secrets of What’s Inside Everyday Products.

The state of Kansas and four nonprofit organizations are seeking federal approval to conduct an experiment that they hope will boost participation in a summer meals program that now is serving only a fraction of eligible children.

Led by the Kansas State Department of Education, the coalition is asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to temporarily waive some rules so that it can conduct a demonstration project to feed needy children in rural parts of the state when school is out for the summer.

Child nutrition is increasingly a topic of debate. Steve Kraske and guests take a closer look at what we’re feeding our children beginning with baby food.  They also look at the impact food insecurity has on making nutritional choices for our kids.

Guests:

Mike Sherry / Hale Center for Journalism at KCPT

The Kansas City of the future would be a place where people have affordable medical care, policymakers work with the community on health issues and residents suffer less from chronic diseases and violence.

That, at any rate, is the consensus that emerged Saturday at a forum in Kansas City, Mo.

And it was just the start of what participants said a vigorous metropolitan area should look like in the next decade.

Gina Kaufmann / KCUR 89.3

You know how sometimes you stumble across a word you've never heard before in your entire life, and then suddenly, the word is everywhere? That happened to me with the pawpaw.

I was born and raised in Missouri, so discovering in my thirties that a random fruit with a made-up-sounding name is considered my state's own banana? That came as a shock (though, to be fair, it's also known as the Indiana banana and the West Virginia banana). 

Hospitals Serving Up More Than Green Jell-O

Jul 18, 2012

Hospital food doesn't tend to conjure images of gourmet cuisine or down-home victuals. In fact, most people tend to turn up their nose at the very thought of the bland meals that hospitals are known for serving.

Unique Grocery Store Rolls Into Kansas City

Jul 18, 2012
Elana Gordon / KCUR

People living in parts of Kansas City that aren’t near a big grocery store now have another food option. But it’s not your typical grocery store, and it’s not run by your typical vendor.

Christi Nielsen

NOTE: Audio is unavailable from today's show. We apologize for the technical difficulties.

Consumers are getting smarter about the food they eat.  We know to check labels for the levels of sodium and saturated fat, and that "high fructose corn syrup" is still sugar.   Most of us hit a wall though when it comes to ingredients such as malodextrin, flavonoids and silicon dioxide.  What are these ingredients found in the  foods we eat and drink

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

Walk into your neighborhood grocery store looking for healthy food and you might get lost amid a sea of confusing labels and dubious claims. Consumers looking to eat right may get the wrong ideas.

HyVee, like many grocery chains, is trying to part that sea and simplify nutrition for consumers who may not want to read the fine print on their food.

At HyVee stores, you’ll find NuVal. It’s a scoring system on a scale of 1 to 100. The healthier the food, the higher the score.

If you've been to a Hy-Vee grocery store recently, chances are you've seen some numbers right next to the price of an item of food.

It's a "NuVal" - a nutritional value placed on each and every food product.