NPR

As presidential candidates vie for votes nationwide, we ask what one vote is really worth. And if you're voting Democrat in strongly Republican Kansas, does your ballot really matter?

Guests:

  • Burdett Loomis is a political scientist at the University of Kansas.
  • Cheyenne Davis is the field and political director for the Kansas Democratic Party
  • KCUR's Elle Moxley and Lisa Rodriguez have been reporting on elections in Kansas.

David Greene has reported on everything from the White House to the Arab Spring to post-Soviet Russia. It all started with his high school newspaper and a lot of help along the way. Even his wife made sacrifices for his career, but Greene says it’s paid off. Now he's co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition.

David Greene is in town for KCUR’s benefit event 'RadioActive' on June 10. Tickets are no longer available.

As NPR's first African-American female host, Michele Norris is no stranger to having tough, meaningful conversations. As curator of The Race Card Project, Norris asks people to express their thoughts about race and identity in six words, which turn out to be more powerful than she expected.

In the latest development in a long-standing disagreement between Kansas election officials and the federal Election Assistance Commission, a judge in Kansas has ruled that the state can't require people to show proof of U.S. citizenship when registering to vote at a motor vehicle office.

In the 1950s, Delano Lewis was a student at segregated Sumner High School in Kansas City, Kansas. Since then, he's held top positions in the Peace Corps, served as president of NPR, was a board member at Apple and served as the U.S. Ambassador to South Africa.  

Delano Lewis speaks about the power of education on his life tonight at 5 p.m. at the Kauffman Foundation. To register to attend go to www.kauffman.org.

Paul Howey

He’s managed to become a public radio star — without saying a word.

If you’re a regular KCUR listener, you’ve heard his name countless times.

BJ Leiderman is the composer of the theme music heard on Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, Car Talk and Marketplace, to name a few.

“I’m the luckiest composer in the land,” Leiderman told Steve Kraske on KCUR’s Up To Date.

Michel Martin is the host of NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered. Next week, she’ll come to the Gem Theater at 18th and Vine for a conversation about food and how we eat. 

Michelle Martin will host an evening of conversation on Tuesday, April 5 at the Gem Theater. For tickets and information visit nprpresents.org.

Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts

For many, Ira Glass and his program, This American Life, have been a gateway into the public radio world. 

But the radio icon, who has one of the most recognizable voices in the business, claims that it took longer for him to get good at telling stories on the radio than anyone else he knows in the business. 

"I was working in public radio starting when I was 19. I knew I wanted to do radio stories ... but doing it well, it really took me until I was 27 or so until I was a decent writer and reporter, maybe 28 really," he says. 

Why do reusable shopping bags make you want to buy more junk food? How do people get stuck in boring jobs? NPR's science correspondent Shankar Vedantam regularly scours social science research to bring us these questions and their answers. 

  The gun has officially gone off for the 2016 presidential elections, and NPR's team of political correspondents and editors are working around the clock to bring you the latest from the White House and the campaign trail. On this edition of Up To Date, we check in with Tamara Keith, Scott Horsley, and Domenico Montanaro

On this edition of Up To Date, Scott Simon discusses sharing his mother’s final days on Twitter and recalls his start with NPR. Plus, his thoughts on people he's interviewed — including Bill Cosby, Ernie Banks, and Michael Jordan. 

NPR / Invisibilia

NPR's newest show, Invisibilia, combines narrative storytelling and scientific research to address the intangible forces that affect our lives, like our thoughts, our emotions, and our ideas.  

On Tuesdays's Up To Date, the show's hosts talk about the making of Invisibilia, and the stories they hope to tell. 

Guests:

Chris Riebschlager / Flickr-CC

The day after Thanksgiving isn't just the nation's craziest shopping day. It's also the day StoryCorps asks for stories that honor those for whom we feel grateful in life.

In the second part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we look at ten years of StoryCorps' 'National Day of Listening.'

Guest:

Dave Isay, founder and president of StoryCorps and author of Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps 

Beth Lipoff/KCUR-FM

If his face isn’t familiar to you, his voice will be. Neal Conan was host of Talk of the Nation for 11 years, and he’s been behind the microphones of NPR for even longer.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, he joins us in the studio to talk about his memories of the long-running call-in show, his experiences working in the news business and what’s next on the horizon for him.

Guest:

It's All Politics, April 5, 2012

Apr 6, 2012

Mitt Romney's sweep in Tuesday's primaries essentially signals the beginning of the general election campaign. And President Obama joins the fray, attacking Romney by name in a speech to news editors; the former Massachusetts governor returns the favor a day later. Paul Ryan draws attention from the president as well as those speculating on the GOP ticket. NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin have the latest in this week's political roundup.