National World War I Museum

Charvex / Wikimedia -- CC

Every Kansas Citian has a list of out-of-towner attractions — barbecue, the Nelson-Atkins, a stroll through the Plaza. But we have been wondering: what should Kansas Citians be putting on our own to-do list? What hidden gems are right next to us that we need to see (or do) at least once?

We asked you to give us your suggestions, and we got a ton of them!

Here we present the incomplete "Kansas Citian bucket list" — a list of things every person in Kansas City should do at least once. Feel free to add additional items in the comments.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

In 1914, at the outbreak of World War I, many artists put their art-making on hold, leaving their studios for the battlefield. Some in the United States waited for years for their country to enter the conflict, and others forged a new path in neutral Switzerland. It was a time of radical approaches in music, visual arts and literature. And now, local arts organizations are marking the centennial of the Great War. 

Music reflects change

National World War I Museum

For many families in America during World War I, newspaper reports were their only connection with loved ones serving in the trenches. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a journalism historian and an archivist from the World War I museum about the life of journalists reporting from the front lines during the Great War.

Whoever Credit Goes To / Flickr--CC

Everyone is familiar with the National World War I Monument in Kansas City, but there are others.

On Monday, we'll hear the stories behind some of the most prominent WWI monuments and memorials in Kansas City. James J. Heiman the author of Voices In the Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials joins us.

Guest:

James J. Heiman is the author of Voices In Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials.

Courtesy: National World War I Museum

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and a new exhibit at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., details the events that led up to the war — from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to the declaration of war a month later on July 28, 1914.

The exhibit presents archival newspaper articles and diplomatic communications from around the world. 

Boston Public Library / Flickr -- Creative Commons

It was known as the Great War—or even The War to End All Wars, even though, of course, it didn’t. It did, however cost 9 million lives, devastated Europe and drew in all the world’s great powers of the day.

Next summer marks the 100th Anniversary of World War I. But how do you remember something that no one alive has first-person experience with?

The answer includes the hiring this month of new staff to head up the effort and start making plans and putting them into action.

International Relations Council

Linda Trout, long-time Executive Director of International Relations Council (IRC) in Kansas City, Mo. has been named Director of Strategic Engagement at the National World War I Museum.

In the new post for the museum, Trout will oversee planning and implementation of the centennial celebration of WWI, beginning next year.

courtesy National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial

The National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial on Monday announced Matthew C. Naylor, PhD, a native of Australia, as its new President and CEO.