National World War I Museum

We begin with a look at the many challenges media outlets face when, under increasing scrutiny from all sides, they are covering a presidential race unlike any other.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

A Kansas City nonprofit that helps connect homeless veterans with housing and jobs held a “stand down” Friday outside the World War I Museum and Memorial.

“We have an extraordinarily high homeless population,” says Art Fillmore, founder and co-chairman of Heart of America Stand Down. “A couple of years ago, it was up to around 1,700 homeless veterans.”

Fillmore says while city and county leaders have been proactive in addressing homelessness, that number is mostly going down as Vietnam veterans die.

courtesy: National World War I Museum and Memorial

Weeks after the end of World War I in 1918, Kansas Citians started fundraising for a memorial. A community fund drive raised more than $2.5 million, and Liberty Memorial opened on Nov. 11, 1926. In 2006, the National World War I Museum, a $102 million project "dedicated to remembering, interpreting and understanding the Great War" opened to the public

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

Florence Hemphill grew up in a small town in Kansas, and saw the horrors of World War I up close when she served as a nurse in France. She wrote more than a hundred letters, sharing her experiences with family members. 

Singer-songwriter Joe Crookston recently teamed up with the National World War I Museum and Memorial to tell her story – through art and music — at the Folk Alliance International Conference in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Nurse, Please

Jan 4, 2016

The history of nursing started on the battlefield. The profession that emerged is still with us, but in a totally transformed medical landscape. Using an exhibit at the World War I Museum as a jumping off point, this discussion explores how the origins of nursing have shaped both the realities and misconceptions of the field today. 


When America declared war on Germany in 1917, most radio stations came under government control, reserved for war efforts. On this edition of Up To Date,  we learn why ham radio operators were prevented from broadcasting during The Great War.


The Telling Project takes the stories of local veterans and veteran family members and turns them into scripts. Those same vets and family members then rehearse those scripts and present them in their community. Two participating area veterans and the founder of The Telling Project talk with Steve Kraske about the Kansas City version.


Whether you want to view World War I from the trenches, explore the war's Christmas truce or cruise the skies, our Video Gurus have something to feed your historical need. Check out what they had to say on this edition of Up to Date.

All Quiet on the Western Front, unrated (before current ratings)

Creative Commons/flickr user jrussell48

John Green, a retired airline pilot, has played "Taps" since his days as a battalion bugler at the Missouri Military Academy, and later as a regimental bugler at The Citadel. 

Green is one of a handful of musicians who'll perform "Taps" each night at sunset through Saturday at Liberty Memorial in a program they're calling Taps at the Tower

Charvex / Wikimedia -- CC

Every Kansas Citian has a list of out-of-towner attractions — barbecue, the Nelson-Atkins, a stroll through the Plaza. But we have been wondering: what should Kansas Citians be putting on our own to-do list? What hidden gems are right next to us that we need to see (or do) at least once?

We asked you to give us your suggestions, and we got a ton of them!

Here we present the incomplete "Kansas Citian bucket list" — a list of things every person in Kansas City should do at least once. Feel free to add additional items in the comments.

Laura Spencer / KCUR

In 1914, at the outbreak of World War I, many artists put their art-making on hold, leaving their studios for the battlefield. Some in the United States waited for years for their country to enter the conflict, and others forged a new path in neutral Switzerland. It was a time of radical approaches in music, visual arts and literature. And now, local arts organizations are marking the centennial of the Great War. 

Music reflects change

National World War I Museum

For many families in America during World War I, newspaper reports were their only connection with loved ones serving in the trenches. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a journalism historian and an archivist from the World War I museum about the life of journalists reporting from the front lines during the Great War.

When war broke out in Europe a century ago, more than one in 10 Missourians was German-American. On this episode we talk about the experiences of Missouri’s German-Americans in World War I.

Whoever Credit Goes To / Flickr--CC

Everyone is familiar with the National World War I Monument in Kansas City, but there are others.

On Monday, we'll hear the stories behind some of the most prominent WWI monuments and memorials in Kansas City. James J. Heiman the author of Voices In the Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials joins us.


James J. Heiman is the author of Voices In Bronze and Stone: Kansas City's World War I Monuments and Memorials.

The National World War I Museum, housed at the base of the Liberty Memorial, is this year marking the 100th anniversary of the start of that war. By pure coincidence, the national tour of the Tony Award-winning play War Horse arrives at the Music Hall next month, creating a rare convergence of history and theatricality in Kansas City.

Confounding the skeptics

Courtesy: National World War I Museum

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and a new exhibit at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., details the events that led up to the war — from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to the declaration of war a month later on July 28, 1914.

The exhibit presents archival newspaper articles and diplomatic communications from around the world. 

Boston Public Library / Flickr -- Creative Commons

It was known as the Great War—or even The War to End All Wars, even though, of course, it didn’t. It did, however cost 9 million lives, devastated Europe and drew in all the world’s great powers of the day.

Next summer marks the 100th Anniversary of World War I. But how do you remember something that no one alive has first-person experience with?

The answer includes the hiring this month of new staff to head up the effort and start making plans and putting them into action.

International Relations Council

Linda Trout, long-time Executive Director of International Relations Council (IRC) in Kansas City, Mo. has been named Director of Strategic Engagement at the National World War I Museum.

In the new post for the museum, Trout will oversee planning and implementation of the centennial celebration of WWI, beginning next year.

courtesy National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial

The National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial on Monday announced Matthew C. Naylor, PhD, a native of Australia, as its new President and CEO.

User: Charvex / Wikipedia

Kansas City Congressman Emmanuel Cleaver says he feels good about the designation of Liberty Memorial as the nation’s official World War One Memorial. The bill made it out of committee this week without any House opposition, but similar measures have had a checkered history.