museums/galleries

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3

The long-running effort to recreate the Kansas City Museum as a major local history museum entered a new phase Monday with the announcement of $1 million in private commitments pledged toward a total of $15 million in private and public money city leaders say is needed to restore the property to "its former glory."

Megan Mantia

Lynnette Miranda is never quite sure what art will be in the shows she curates. Miranda, a Miami native who’s six months into an 18-month stint as the Charlotte Street Foundation's curator-in-residence, says she curates artists, not art objects.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The Bloch family has given a lot to Kansas City, including a donation of 29 masterworks by Impressionist and Post-Impressionist artists of the late 19th century to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Today we're live from the Bloch Galleries, previewing the collection's new home inside the museum. 

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3

At first glance, the painter Ada Koch and the poet Glenn North might seem an unlikely pair. But what has emerged from their collaboration — Love, Loss & Violence: A Visual Dialogue on War, an art exhibit opening this weekend at the Kansas City Artists Coalition and an accompanying book — illustrates with painful honesty that certain fears are universal.

Courtesy Pedro Lasch

Pedro Lasch’s artwork challenges familiar ideas of identity and belonging, of which he has first-hand knowledge. Lasch – a citizen of Mexico, Austria and Germany – became a United States citizen on Inauguration Day this year. His was the last round of naturalization ceremonies in the Obama presidency.

Lasch, a visual artist from Mexico City and professor at Duke University, titled his series “Abstract Nationalism & National Abstraction.” The work employs a fusion of flags and national anthems from around the world.

Courtesy Wonderscope Children's Museum

Leaders of the Wonderscope Children’s Museum of Kansas City, which is currently located near Johnson Drive and Nieman Road in Shawnee, Kansas, announced Tuesday that they plan to raise $12 million for a new building in the Red Bridge Shopping Center at 112th and Holmes in south Kansas City.

Plans are to share the building with the Red Bridge location of the Mid-Continent Public Library.

Courtesy World War I Museum and Memorial

Sally Keithley-McCulley shared a room with her sisters in Norfolk, England. Every morning of her childhood, she woke to see a photograph hanging over the bedroom’s fireplace: her father, in his World War I British soldier uniform, standing next to a horse.

A few weeks ago, Keithley-McCulley, now 91 and living in Shawnee, saw that the National WWI Museum and Memorial wanted people to vote on a favorite poster for its upcoming exhibition “Posters as Munitions.” She knew she wanted to participate.

Courtesy National Orphan Train Complex

There’s only one train line left in Concordia, Kansas (population just over 5,000), and it hauls grain. But more than a hundred years ago there were four train lines. Some of them were passenger trains, and in the 1880s, one carried a group of unaccompanied children from New York.

It stopped in nearby Wayne, Kansas, where strangers were waiting to choose the children.

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City artist Nedra Bonds has just endured months of chemotherapy, radiation and a double mastectomy to treat breast cancer.

Given all she's been through, the fact that she's opening a retrospective exhibition of her life's work (to date) might carry extra poignancy.

"That had not occurred to me," says Bonds, who appears to focus her energies more outward than inward, such as when she responded to her diagnosis last year with a community art project.

Courtesy Museum Of Nebraska Art / Collection of the Artist

The Museum of Nebraska Art — or MONA — sits on the main drag of the small, central Nebraska town of Kearney. This winter, it has featured work by the state's Latina artists in the first show of its kind.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3FM

E.G. Schempf has photographed the artwork of some of Kansas City’s best-known artists. Alongside the commissioned work he undertakes for artists, galleries and museums, Schempf takes personal photographs around the edges.

His new exhibit, E.G. Schempf — Pedestal View at Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art, showcases a selection of behind-the-scenes images of darkened galleries and test photographs he has taken over the years. Sherry Leedy says Schempf is humble and sees himself as merely supporting artists, but that without Schempf those artists would go unseen.
 

Courtesy of Mid-America Arts Alliance

Two young children look toward a mother figure, her face turned to the side facing the American flag.

“For in thee the oppressed find justice and mercy,” reads the accompanying text.

The image is from a World War II poster created by Polish artist Wladyslaw Teodor “W.T.” Benda.

“Isn’t that beautiful?” asks Hal Wert, a professor at the Kansas City Art Institute.

Meanz Chan / Courtesy Front/Space

Art is a process that often takes place in quiet spaces, away from large crowds. But on Saturday night, Madeline Gallucci and Kendell Harbin say they plan to pull back the curtain on the creative impulse.

Co-directors of the Crossroads gallery Front/Space, Gallucci and Harbin invited 28 artists to draw, paint, print and collage original works for the four-hour live drawing fundraiser. As each work is completed, it goes on the gallery wall for immediate sale at $30.
 

Courtesy Kansas City Irish Center

The Kansas City Irish Center begins 2017 with much to celebrate. After almost a decade in the lower level of Union Station, last year the Center bought historic Drexel Hall, in Midtown at the corner of Linwood and Baltimore, and moved into its new home in September. 

“It’s in a location that we really want in the heart of the city, where a lot of the cultural activities are happening, and where the history of the Irish is in Kansas City,” says Nancy Wormington, the center’s executive director.

Courtesy and copyright of the Mildred Thompson Estate, Atlanta, GA

The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri, received some welcome news in this first week of the new year: a $50,000 grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Courtesy Lansing Historical Museum

When Jennifer Myer looks at the photographs along the wall of her tiny museum next to the Lansing Correctional Facility, the experience is "humbling," she says.

Others who've seen the images say they're "haunting."

E.G. Schempf

When Grand Arts closed in the fall of 2015 after a 20-year tenure in the Crossroads, Stacy Switzer, the artistic director of the organization (calling it a "gallery" would be inadequate), said it had been a place of "extraordinary" freedom for artists. 

Celeste Lindell/Flickr

The board of commissioners of the Planned Industrial Expansion Authority, or PIEA, approved a new plan on Thursday for the Crossroads Arts District in Kansas City, Missouri. The nearly 40 properties in the Crossroads occupied by artists or for arts activities will get a 50 percent tax abatement for 15 years. Taxes will be frozen at the 2016 assessed value.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

After a carol from the Heartland Men's Chorus, we delve into The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art exhibition featuring a 16th century piece of music you have to hear to believe. Then, we explore how museums serve as places for community congregation, not simply as repositories for art.

The biggest new thing at KU's Spencer Museum of Art isn't a thing at all – it's natural light. The museum recently reopened after undergoing a structural overhaul, bringing bigger windows, and more of them. How do local renovations, like this one, reflect changing trends in museum architecture? And how do they impact the way we think about art?

Courtesy UMKC Gallery of Art

Davin Watne and Barry Anderson were feeling some pressure.

“It’s been a while since you’ve had a faculty show,” people kept reminding Watne, the curator and director of the UMKC Gallery of Art.

In Ancient Rome, members of the privileged elite communicated their wealth and status by adorning themselves and their homes with a variety of luxury goods. A new exhibit at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art showcases some of the most extraordinary pieces of the Empire. 

Guest:

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

Even if you're not that familiar with art, you probably know what Andy Warhol's Campbell's Soup cans look like.

In April, seven of Warhol's iconic soup can prints from the 1960s — including tomato and chicken noodle — were stolen from the Springfield Art Museum in southwest Missouri. As a set, they were worth about $500,000, but the thieves didn't take them all. 

Nick Nelson, Springfield Art Museum director, stands inside a quiet gallery in a new wing of the building with the standard gray carpeting, white walls and track lighting.

Blake Little

Blake Little made pictures of beautiful cowboys.

Little was a professional photographer, doing film and television work and shooting magazine covers in Los Angeles. When he and a friend went to their first rodeo, he wanted to be a cowboy, too.

“We were hooked immediately, by the whole scene, watching it, imagining that these guys were really doing this, and they were gay,” Little would later say of the first International Gay Rodeo Association event he attended, in Los Angeles in 1988.

Early-American Manuscripts Coming To Independence

Jun 1, 2016

The founding principles of the American experiment weren't just a bunch of ideas floating around the heads of the founding fathers, they were ideals that were put to paper. Examining those documents first-hand is an opportunity to reflect on the issues our nation faced then, and what lessons we should carry with us into the future.

Guest:

courtesy SFS Architecture

In the early 1950s, the Kansas City Power & Light Co. dreamed up a futuristic home to demonstrate — and promote — the potential of electrical technology. The target audience: couples moving to the suburbs. 

The owners of a popular children's bookstore in Brookside are moving on to their new project: an immersive "explorastorium" for children's literature, to be called The Rabbit Hole. The inside scoop on this couple's love affair with stories, books, paper-mache... and each other. 

Guests:

File Photo / Paul Andrews

 

The challenges facing the American Jazz Museum will fall to new leadership.

Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner takes the reins of the 20-year-old organization after spending the past 25 years with the Kansas City Public Library.

C.J. Janovy / KCUR

Even though the Kansas City Museum is devoted solely to local history, it has an opportunity to be world-class, says its director, Anna Maria Tutera.

Tutera envisions an institution such as the City Museum of New York or the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, both in New York City, both associated with former grand mansions.

Courtesy of Gary Staab

Gary Staab might appear to be an ordinary guy.

He lives in small-town, rural Kearney, Missouri, with his wife, Lissi, and their two teenage sons, Max and Owen. He plays guitar for the Mechanical Prairie Dogs, and is learning to play cello in his spare time.

But for a living, Staab sculpts prehistoric monsters and ancient human ancestors. He constructs wooden skeleton bases, shapes and welds bodies with wire, crafts muscles and eyeballs and molds resin flesh with epoxy.

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