Mothers

Up All Night

Jun 9, 2017
Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR 89.3

Weird stuff happens in the middle of the night. We share stories recorded at a live storytelling event hosted by Gina.

Subscribe on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play and Stitcher.

Courtesy of Brit Bennett

A new species of rat has made its way to Discover Magazine's list of top scientific discoveries in 2016. KU professor Robert Timm shares how he came across the Rattus detentus, and why he named it after a detainment center on the mammal's home island off the coast of Australia.

Eva Wilson / Leawood Baptist Church

Kansas City recently hit a milestone: 2016 saw the highest number of homicides in the past 10 years. What's going on in the metro? A look at what each death means for KC and its children.

Guests:

Alissa Walker / Flickr - CC

Before LaCroix Sparking Water became a trendy drink, it was a favorite of Midwestern moms.

That’s according to Vox.com reporter Libby Nelson, author of "Why LaCroix Sparkling Water Is Suddenly Everywhere."

In her article, she traces how the bubbly drink  — which she remembers from her Kansas City childhood as “the pastel cases of tasteless soda that my Girl Scout leader packed into her minivan” — went from a Midwestern staple to a status symbol.

www.cafesocietymovie.com

From Norway to New Zealand, this week's picks from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics will have your mind stretched in time and place. 

Cynthia Haines

Cafe Society, PG-13

  • Bobby Dorfman, a Bronx native, moves from New York to Hollywood in the 1930s, and falls in love. As he heads back to New York, he finds himself swept up in the glamor of high society nightlife.

Tallulah, Not rated

Dorothy Hawkins is one of five women depicted on a mural at 39th and Troost. These are the grandmothers of Manheim Park, according to artist Alexander Austin. In anticipation of Mother's Day, hear how one woman's struggles and hard work made a difference to the people closest to her.

Guest:

  • Dorothy Hawkins, Manheim Park

PHOTOS: Where Kansas City Mothers Pump Breast Milk

Dec 4, 2015
Courtesy photo / Gillian Helm

Going back to work after having a baby can create a daunting to-do list for new mothers.

Find a quality day care, adjust work schedules, come up with a contingency care plan when the baby’s sick — and so on.

 And if the mom nurses or breast feeds, high on that list is figuring out how and where she will pump her breast milk when she’s away from her baby.

In the past couple of weeks, we’ve been asking new moms to share photos of where they pump.  

A newborn changes everything (like sleep schedules — or, rather, lack thereof). And if you're a working mom, you're also dealing with work-life balance, finding a place to pump and more.

We take a look at maternity leave in and around KC with an HR expert, a former lactation consultant and local moms.

Guests:

Tell KCUR: Show Us Where You Pump

Nov 20, 2015
KCUR 89.3

 

Maybe it's a cozy room that your employer provides. Perhaps it's a broom closet or your car. Or maybe you've had to get resourceful in a public bathroom.

Nursing mothers, we want to know where you pump your breast milk when you're away from your babies.

As our morning talk show, Central Standard, prepares for a program on maternity, help us shed some light on breastfeeding friendly (or unfriendly) workplaces in the Kansas City area.

Tell KCUR: Show Us Where You Pump (Or Pumped)

Paper Source

Oct 9, 2015
Paul Andrews

A Kansas City Star reporter talks about falling in love with her story subjects, her path into journalism and motherhood.

Guest:

  • Mará Rose Williams, education reporter and parenting columnist, Kansas City Star

KU News Service/University of Kansas

From the hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx physically fusing to its offspring, to the fish Geophagus altifrons protecting mobile juveniles in their mouths, mothering styles vary from species to species. We invited two professors from KU's Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and the director of living collections at the Kansas City Zoo to discuss the maternal instinct — or lack thereof — in the animal world.

Guests:

Turning Into Your Mother? These Kansas Citians Are

May 8, 2014
Susan Foster / Submitted photo

From an appreciation of art to a knack for grammar, moms pass down a lot of traits to their sons and daughters that go beyond eye color.

In honor of Mother’s Day, KCUR wanted to know what about your mom you see in yourself. We used our airwaves and social media this week to ask: How are you like your mother?

julie / Flickr, Creative Commons

You could be forgiven if you happen to believe that Mother's Day is a holiday invented by florists, candy stores and greeting card companies. In point of fact, however, this holiday has a hard-won, grassroots history that puts today's celebrations in context.

On Central Standard, a historian introduced us to three women who lobbied for a mother's day of sorts: the first out of a desire for peace, the second to decrease infant mortality through education, and the third in service of her own professional yearnings.

On Motherhood: When You Were A Fish

May 8, 2014
Courtesy of Liz Tascio

Liz Tascio is a guest contributor to Central Standard, she first shared the essay below at a Kansas City event called Listen To Your Mother

Before you were born, you were a fish. When you were a fish I tried imagining you as a baby, as my baby, but I couldn’t. I was 35 years old and nervous. I was afraid I’d get my heart set on you and then lose you to miscarriage. I was also scared that everything would be fine but that I'd fail you somehow, that I wouldn’t be a good mom.

Listen To Your Mother

May 6, 2013
listentoyourmothershow.com

With Mother's Day on the horizon, one group wants you to listen to your mother.

Ask a mother how her day went and you may often hear the word “running” in the answer as in: running errands, running after the kids, running to make an appointment.