Missouri Legislature | KCUR

Missouri Legislature

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson signed legislation Thursday that will cut the state's top individual income tax rate to 5.4 percent next year.

Updated July 12 with brief response from plaintiffs' attorney - A Cole County judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging the appointment of Mike Kehoe as Missouri’s lieutenant governor.

In a ruling issued late Wednesday, Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem said that Gov. Mike Parson had the authority to appoint fellow Republican Kehoe to the state’s No. 2 office, under the Missouri Constitution.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Kansas City Council is considering a measure to increase transparency in city government.

The measure, introduced by councilman Scott Taylor, would limit lobbyist gifts and meals to city councilmembers to $5, require city officials to wait two years after leaving office before lobbying or doing business in front of the city and limit taxpayer-funded travel for members of the city council.

University of Missouri-Kansas City

The University of Missouri-Kansas City has taken a new step toward building a conservatory after a previous plan was halted last year, according to the Kansas City Business Journal.

A new Missouri law orders the state to create guidelines for testing, processing and storing rape kits, which collect DNA evidence from victims of sexual violence.

Lt. Gov. Mike Parson set forth on a new chapter in Missouri political history by becoming the state’s 57th governor — promising to stabilize a state government rocked by departing-Gov. Eric Greitens’ scandals.

Parson, 62, took the oath of office shortly after 5:30 p.m., Friday.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

 

What caused Missouri Governor Eric Greitens to resign now and reactions from area Republicans and Democrats

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Updated May 30, 2018 — Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens has resigned after coming under intense scrutiny over allegations of breaking campaign finance rules and participating in sexually coercive behavior and blackmail.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

  Segment 1: Missouri State Auditor on what she counts as legislative victories in this year's regular session.

This past legislative session, Missouri lawmakers passed a law that strengthens protections for so-called "whistleblowers." Today, the Missouri state auditor told us why she pushed for this legislation, and what the implications are for state workers. We also learned why Gov. Eric Greitens' move to use taxpayer dollars to pay for private attorneys has her concerned.  

Chris Moreland / Missouri House Communications

Segment 1: Kansas and Missouri "silence breakers" speak up about their own sexual harassment and assult. 

In the wake of the #MeToo Movement, awareness of sexual misconduct in state government has increased steadily. Today, two women recalled their experiences of sexual harrassment while working in the Missouri and Kansas statehouses. They say speaking out about the misconduct will help other women avoid similar harrassment. 

Two people stand in front of a small white prop plane. The background is a blue sky.
James and Deborah Fallows

Segment 1: What Missouri lawmakers passed — and what they didn't — during last week's end-of-session chaos. 

There was certainly lots of news coming out of Jefferson City this year, but much of it didn't have a whole lot to do with legislation. Today, two regular faces around the Missouri Capitol tell us about the bills lawmakers pushed through, and what was lost or ignored this session in the wake of controversies swirling around Gov. Eric Greitens.

Jo Mannies / St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Missouri’s 2018 General Assembly session will likely be remembered most for the legal and ethical travails of Gov. Eric Greitens. But the Republican-dominated legislature managed to approve numerous policy initiatives — the impact of which may last longer than Greitens’ tenure.

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A measure that would have narrowly legalized medical marijuana died in the final week of Missouri’s legislative session, meaning the issue will be left entirely up to voters in November.

Charlize Theron sits with a pregnant belly.
Focus Features

Segment 1: Will Missouri lawmakers move to impeach Governor Eric Greitens?

This evening, the Missouri legislature will convene for a historic special session to determine whether to bring forth articles of impeachment against Gov. Eric Greitens. But how complicated is the process, and how will it unfold in the coming weeks? We sat down with two political watchers to ask what could be next for the governor.

(Updated at 10:22 p.m. May 18 with the latest on the special session.)

Missouri’s special legislative session to consider whether to impeach Gov. Eric Greitens has officially begun, but so far nothing much has happened.

House and Senate members briefly opened the session Friday to make a few motions, then adjourned until Tuesday to hold technical sessions, which last a couple of minutes and only require two or three lawmakers per chamber. But the committee that’s been investigating Greitens is meeting twice next week.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Regulations on professional hair braiding in Missouri may soon be loosened under a bill passed by the legislature this session. 

In Missouri, a person currently needs a cosmetology license, which requires 1,500 hours of training and costs tens of thousands of dollars, to braid hair. 

"That's more than are required to be a police officer, an EMT and a realtor, combined," says Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-St. Louis.

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Missouri would join a majority of U.S. states in raising the age someone can be tried as an adult in court to 18 under a bill passed by the legislature this session.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens allegedly directed a staffer to obtain a donor list from the veterans charity he founded and lied about it to the state ethics commission, according to a special House committee report released Wednesday.

Immediately, Democrats and some Republicans again called for Greitens, who faces two felony charges, to step down. Greitens' camp dug in with legal counsel Catherine Hanaway's statement that said the report "does a tremendous disservice to the U.S. and Missouri Constitutions." 

Legislation that would legalize marijuana for medical use in Missouri passed the state House on Tuesday.

The bill originally would have only allowed medical marijuana use for terminally ill patients, but the House added amendments last week to expand access to those with chronic and debilitating, but not necessarily fatal, illnesses.

Carolina Hidalgo / File/St. Louis Public Radio

Segment 1: The processes threatening, and protecting, Missouri's governor.

Tensions are high in Jefferson City as lawmakers continue calls for Eric Greitens' resignation but, as the governor faces possibly career-ending felony charges, ensuring fairness is paramount. Today, a veteran journalist discusses the systems in place to guarantee justice for the governor, and for the state of Missouri.

Updated April 20 at 7 p.m. with statements from Gov. Greitens and his attorney  St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner has charged Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens with a felony related to illegally taking a fundraising list from a veterans charity he co-founded. The charge, a class D felony, is for tampering with computer data. 

It’s the latest legal malady for the GOP governor, who is also facing a felony invasion of privacy charge for allegedly taking a revealing photo of a woman without her consent. 

U.S. Navy

Politicians from both parties in Kansas and Missouri have voiced their support of President Donald Trump's decision to launch airstrikes in Syria Friday night. The bombings targeted chemical weapons research and storage facilities after a recent suspected chemical attack on civilians in Syria.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, commended the president for responding quickly to the suspected chemical attack.

"I support this effort and believe the president has the full authority to take these actions," Blunt said in a written statement

Airman First Class Jovan Banks / U.S. Air Force

An explicit report was released yesterday by a Missouri House committee with testimony from the woman who was involved in an extramarital affair with Governor Eric Greitens. The report details alleged sexual abuse perpetrated by Greitens during their relationship. In its wake, more state lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are calling for his resignation.

Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio file photo

This story has been updated with additional information.

A Missouri House committee report on Gov. Eric Greitens contains graphic details about the affair between the governor and his former hair stylist, including an unwanted sexual encounter and a threat of blackmail.

Tim Lair / Tim Lair Photography

Much of Kansas City’s economic development over the past few decades is thanks, in part, to tax breaks given to developers by the city.

 

The shops at Zona Rosa and Briarcliff in the Northland, the Power and Light District and Crossroads Arts District downtown, and the massive Cerner development in south Kansas City, just to name a few, all benefit from tax abatements.

 

But developers may have a tougher time getting those breaks under a bill making its way through the Missouri legislature.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

In light of newly passed legislation impacting gun laws and school funding, many college students in Kansas and Missouri may not feel like lawmakers are hearing their concerns. 

Two student lobbyists are hoping to change that.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How do university students ensure their priorities have a voice in state government?

Students in Kansas and Missouri have concerns that go beyond their next exams and life after graduation. They point to soaring tuition rates, concealed weapons on campus, sexual harassment and assault, and state support for higher education. To communicate their concerns, student lobbyists work the hallways in both state Capitols. Today, we met the students who do this important work.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Missouri call for convention of states to amend U.S. Constitution for term limits working its way through legislature.

While Missouri state lawmakers can't be re-elected indefinitely, those elected to serve at the national level don't have such limits, and sometimes hold a seat for decades. Today, we talked about what it would take to get this changed in Washington.

courtesy: Helix Architecture + HGA Architects

The Missouri Legislature might once again consider funding for a proposed downtown campus of the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance.

Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is due in a St. Louis court on May 14 to face trial on the felony invasion of privacy charge stemming from his 2015 affair.

But prosecutors admitted Wednesday that they don’t have one key piece of evidence: the photo Greitens allegedly took of the woman “in a state of full or partial nudity.”

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