MindDrive

MINDDRIVE

Uber's got a plan to get commuters off the ground and into the air. Is it feasible? Also, learn about Kansas City's mentorship program that has students building 3-D printed cars. Then, find out how city leaders from across the country are using massive amounts of open data to build smarter, more efficient city services.

MINDDRIVE

 If you go to the 2016 Kansas City Auto Show at Bartle Hall, you may spot among the shiny new SUVs and tricked-out sports cars something more incongruous. It's squat and narrow, resembling a more advanced version of a Soapbox Derby car. 

Look again: that car was printed by a 3-D printer and designed by high school kids in Kansas City. 

Students from MINDDRIVE, a project-based learning organization, will unveil an experimental 3D-printed vehicle at the Kansas City International Auto Show. The electric car, designed by high schoolers, is 12 feet in length and looks like a formula race car. 

Guests:

MindDrive.org

The goal: Have at-risk students take an old rundown car, restore it and convert it to run on electric power then drive it from K.C. to D.C.   If that's not enough, have it powered solely by social media interaction.