Author Jen Lancaster has learned never to take a Prada bag to the unemployment office or wear a fur coat to the animal shelter. She's lived like Martha Stewart and discovered that pie is not the answer.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, she joins Steve Kraske to discuss her origins as a blogger, how her projects become memoirs and her new book, I Regret Nothing.


After spending his childhood in abject poverty, Dr. William Reed eventually climbed his way to director of Cardiac Surgery at KU Medical Center. In his new book, The Pulse of Hope: A Surgeon's Memoirs from Poverty to Prosperity, Reed reflects on his long journey.

HEAR MORE: Dr. Reed will speak Tuesday Jan. 27, at 7 p.m. at Unity Temple on the Plaza. For information on the event, click here.

It can be a lonely, difficult life when you’re a farmer on the high plains of western Kansas.

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we discuss a new memoir about a woman who returned to the family farm. We talk with her about the hardships she faced-- ghosts from her past, adjusting back to farm life after years away and dealing with the looming threat of drought as the nearby river levels kept dropping.


Families are complicated for everyone, and author Pat Conroy knows this well. His first memoir, The Great Santini, explored the abusive relationship Conroy had with his father.

In the second part of Thursday's Up to Date, Conroy joins Steve Kraske to talk about the follow-up to that book, The Death of Santini, which explores the interactions between Conroy and his father after The Great Santini was published.


With Jimmy Fallon due to take over "The Tonight Show" in early 2014, many are looking back to the days when Johnny Carson hosted the late night show.

On Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Carson's former lawyer, Henry Bushkin about his new behind-the-scenes memoir detailing his relationship with the longest running "Tonight Show" host. From their initial meeting in 1970 to their falling out in 1988, Carson trusted Bushkin as his legal advisor, tennis partner, and close friend. 


Aging Farmers

Jul 11, 2013
Neuse Education Team / CC

Over the last few decades, the landscape and daily operations of the American farm have changed dramatically; technology, crop prices, crop technique and farm size. But one thing that has stayed the same is the individual farmers who are adapting to these techniques. Here's a startling statistic, for each farmer younger than 25, there are five who are 75 or older. And also, 25% of farmers are over the age of 65, which means retirement in the farming community is being prolonged.

What does it feel like to become a grandparent? There’s the initial excitement of the moment, but it’s something that changes your whole life.

After the untimely death of a loved one, people often find themselves with more questions than answers.