Local

Government
9:27 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Kinder Blasts Obamacare One Week Before Health Exchange Opens

Lt. Governor Peter Kinder, a Republican, blasted President Obama's Affordable Care Act Monday, just over one week before Missouri's federally-run health insurance exchange is scheduled to open for business.

Kinder told reporters during a conference call that he hopes Missouri residents without health coverage will opt not to use the exchange.

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Sports
9:17 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Royals Walk-off Grand Slam Seals Winning Season

In pursuit of post-season play, the Kanas City Royals revived interest September baseball.  For the final home game at Kauffman Stadium a crowd of more than 27,000 gathered. Manager Ned Yost sensed the enthusiasm.

“We needed to get the crowd into the game early, and we couldn’t do it,” said Yost.

Then the Royals loaded the bases in the tenth inning of the scoreless ballgame when Justin Maxwell stepped to the plate.

“I was just thinking of trying to hit it hard,” said Maxwell.

There was no doubt when Maxwell hit it. It was a grand slam.

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Harvest Public Media
6:03 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Obamacare Could Be Tough Sell In Rural Areas

Bob Bernt and his wife, Kristine, have gone without health insurance for the last 20 years, and don’t plan on buying coverage to meet the individual mandate in the Affordable Care Act.
Credit Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

 

The Affordable Care Act, often called “Obamacare,” takes a big step forward Oct. 1 when new health insurance marketplaces open for enrollment. Rural families are more likely to qualify for subsidized coverage, but reaching them to sign up will be part of the challenge.

So, will farm country take advantage of new health insurance subsidies? That’s the question in Nebraska.

Almost 200,000 Nebraskans don’t have health insurance. Nearly half of them are spread across the state’s rural areas.

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Up To Date
10:07 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Saving The Environment With Policy And Protest

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (left) and Bob McKibben (right)
Credit Concert for the Climate

If commitment was all it took to reverse global warming and stop pollution of of land, air and water, then Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and Bill McKibben would be considered environmental superheroes.

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Government
4:05 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

President Lauds KC Ford, Chides Congress

President Barack Obama at Ford's new plant at Liberty, MO.
Credit Dan Verbeck / KCUR

President Barack Obama drew heavily on automotive references as he spread his economic recovery message at the Ford Plant at Liberty, MO  today.  The President also took on Congress’ pitting the debt ceiling against the Affordable Care.

The President told a crowd of mostly auto workers, their families and supporters Congress must raise the debt ceiling or fallout would make America a “deadbeat”  to the world.

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Up to Date
4:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Local Listen: Lennon Bone

Lennon Bone is probably best known among music lovers as the drummer for Ha Ha Tonka, but he recently released a new EP of his own material that’s got a gentle, dreamy-folk sound. It’s called “Call It A Custom.”

In today's "Local Listen," we hear the title track to the four-song EP. His band, Ha Ha Tonka releases their new album, “Lessons,” on September 24th.

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Up to Date
9:45 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Up To Date's Indie, Foreign & Doc Critics' 'Three To See,' Sept. 20-22

Lake Bell stars in 'In A World'.

Looking for a great film to see the weekend of Sept. 20-22? Up to Date's indie, documentary and foreign film critics share their three favorites showing on area screens.    Cynthia Haines:

  • Short Term 12 
  • In A World
  • Hannah Arendt

Steve Walker:

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Government
9:18 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Kansas Regents Request $30 Million More

The Kansas Board of Regents has approved a budget request that asks for restoration of millions of dollars in cuts. Lawmakers cut more than $30 million from the higher education budget last legislative session.

The cuts to higher education were made to across-the-board spending, and funding for salaries.

Lawmakers passed a two-year budget last session, but members of the Board or Regents said they have a responsibility to advocate for increased investment in higher ed. The regents backed off a proposal that would have promised flat tuition if the cuts were reversed.

Performance
9:17 am
Fri September 20, 2013

'The Capulets And The Montagues,' Love In A World Of Conflict

The Capulets gather in their fortress on the eve of battle with the Montagues.
Julie Denesha KCUR

The story of the rivalry between the Capulets and the Montagues is familiar to fans of Shakespeare. But a variation on the theme of the secret, doomed love between Romeo and Giulietta is explored in the Lyric Opera of Kansas City's production of The Capulets and the Montagues (I Capuleti e i Montecchi).

Vincenzo Bellini's opera premiered in 1830 and looked to early Renaissance sources for inspiration. Unlike Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Bellini's work  focuses as much on the conflict between the families as it focuses on the bond between the lovers.

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NPR Story
7:39 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Top U.S. Health Official Says Insurance Marketplace Will Help Many ― But Not All

U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius speaks to reporters at St. Louis City Hall, while St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis City Health Director Pam Walker, and St. Louis County Health Director Delores Gunn look on (left to right).

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 10:35 am

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Film
5:30 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Film Review: 'Thanks For Sharing' Barrels Through Addiction, Recovery, and Relapse

Mark Ruffalo (center) and Tim Robbins (right) share the woes of sex addiction in 'Thanks for Sharing.'

For a movie about addiction to work, it needs to get its hands dirty. Even if it ends with the sunniest sobriety imaginable, it has to earn it; it has to show a protagonist hitting rock bottom. Thanks for Sharing is such a movie.

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Visual Arts
5:00 am
Fri September 20, 2013

'Gard Blue' Fills Spencer Museum Of Art With Light

Gard Blue, 1968. Copyright James Turrell
Credit Florian Holzherr / Collection of Mark and Lauren Booth/Courtesy Spencer Museum of Art

The "thingness," or the physicality of light, has been a focus of exploration for artist James Turrell for five decades. This summer, three major exhibitions of Turrell's work opened in Los Angeles, Houston, and New York, where he turned the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda into, what one critic described as, a "meditative spectacle."

At the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Turrell's Gard Blue, a projected light work, dates to the 1960s, when the artist first started exploring the potential of light.

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KC Currents
4:41 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Artist Paul Anthony Smith Mines History Of His Native Jamaica

Paul Anthony Smith, Market, 2013, unique picotage and spray paint on color print
courtesy of Joshua Ferdinand

Artist Paul Anthony Smith is riding the wave of early success. Just a few years after graduating from the Kansas City Art Institute, Smith was invited to do a one –person show at the ZieherSmith Gallery in New York.   Recently, Smith was listed by the Huffington Post as one of America’s top 30 black artists under 40. His paintings take a fresh look at the lives of everyday people in his home country of Jamaica.  

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Up to Date
4:00 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

The Festive Circuit Of Art Fairs

The Plaza Art Fair, as it looks today.
Tim Samoff/Flickr-CC

Every year, a cadre of visual artists joins with live musicians for a festival of food, photography, sculpture and more on the Country Club Plaza. 

On Friday's Up to Date, we take a look at the business side of the Plaza Art Fair. We discuss the fair’s long history, what it takes to plan an event like this and hear what it’s like to be a traveling artist who lives on the art fair circuit.

Guests:

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KC Currents
12:29 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

A KC Chiefs’ Haven Deep In South Philly

Big Charlie's Saloon is a Chiefs bar in the middle of Eagles territory.
Credit Elana Gordon / WHYY

The Kansas City Chiefs are gearing up to play in Philadelphia tonight.  It’s an awkward homecoming for the Chiefs' new coach Andy Reid, who was with the Eagles for 14 years and was fired last December.

But there’s at least one spot, in the heart of South Philadelphia, where Reid won’t get booed when he walks into the stadium.  That’s Big Charlie’s Saloon, the home for Chiefs fans in Philadelphia.  And most of those fans aren’t Kansas City ex-pats.

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Central Standard
11:57 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Is Kansas City Bike Friendly?

For most of us getting around Kansas City is a matter of finding the road with the least traffic and no construction. But for some of us, the problems are more elemental than that: Is there a bike lane or will I have to dodge traffic? Can I walk to get my groceries or go to the doctor? What do I do if I don’t have a car? 

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Central Standard
11:52 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Kansas City Prepares For The Baby Boomers

Credit Ethan Prater / Flickr - CC

We all know that the baby boomer generation is getting older. As the baby boomers enter into their  sixties and seventies, our population will experience a significant age shift. In fact, the number of residents over age 65 will double over the next 20 years, and community members over the age of 80 will be increasing at an even faster rate. But what happens when Grandma and Grandpa can no longer drive, or even live on their own?

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KC Currents
9:18 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Controversial Statue In OP Raises Questions About Nudity In Art

Credit Julie Denesha / KCUR

The Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens has been home to a statue called Accept or Reject by Chinese sculptor Yu Chang since the fall of 2011. It's a bronze, mostly nude, headless sculpture of a woman taking a photograph of herself.

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Performance
5:00 am
Thu September 19, 2013

'Red Badge Variations' Updates Classic Novel To Present Day Afghanistan

(Left to right): Jacob Aaron Cullum (as Henry Fleming), Matt Leonard (as Wilson), Matthew Joseph (as JC), Jake Walker (as Doc), and Francisco Javier Villegas (as Tat) in Red Badge Variations.
Credit J. Robert Schraeder / courtesy of Coterie Theatre.

Between this month and next summer, The Coterie Theatre will unveil three world premieres, including a new play inspired by the classic novel The Red Badge of Courage. Playwright Melissa Cooper calls the play Red Badge Variations, and rather than revisit the book's Civil War setting, she was given the go-ahead to update it in order to tell the story of five soldiers serving in present day Afghanistan.

Soldiers' stories

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Visual Arts
11:38 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Charlotte Street's Julie Dalgleish On Bringing New 'Energy and Passion'

Charlotte Street Foundation's new executive director, Julie Gordon Dalgleish.
Credit Sabrina Staires / Courtesy of Charlotte Street Foundation

Her three-decade career working with arts and cultural organizations has taken her to cities across the country, and into Canada. But, for most of her adult life, Julie Dalgleish has been based in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area - until now.

Dalgleish moved to Kansas City in August, as the new executive director of the Charlotte Street Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1997 by David Hughes – it provides fellowships, residencies, studios, and exhibitions for Kansas City artists. She talked about what encouraged her to make the move.

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Sports
7:39 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Royals Hold On To Post-Season Hopes

Heading into late September, the Kansas City Royals are holding on to their hopes of reaching baseball’s playoffs for the first time since their World Series championship in 1985. A late season surge reversed a downward spiral at the All-Star break.

A rocky start to the season  

This spring the Kansas City Royals tied a franchise record set only one year earlier for 11 straight losses at home. Manager Ned Yost seemed at a loss about what to do next.

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Education
6:36 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Kansas City School Officials Plead For Provisional Accreditation

The superintendent of Kansas City Public Schools went to Jefferson City Tuesday to make his case that the district should regain provisional accreditation early. Superintendent Steve Green pointed to a dramatic improvement in school performance reports and an audit that found no issues.

Green says a policy that would allow students to transfer out of unaccredited schools would harm the district’s progress.

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People
6:08 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Home For Prostitutes Creates Controversy Over Future Of Theology School

St. Paul's School of Theology is considered a "jewel" in it's Northeast neighborhood.
Credit Laura Ziegler / KCUR

When St. Paul’s School of Theology moved to Johnson County, Kansas last year, it left a beautiful, 19-acre campus in Northeast Kansas City, Mo. vacant. Now, the campus could become home to recovering prostitutes, drug and alcohol addicts, and at-risk boys. 

The city would have to rezone the area, and some neighbors aren’t happy. They believe a proposal to put a group of social service agencies on the campus will damage the neighborhood’s image and possibly jeopardize their safety.

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Up to Date
4:00 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

A Return To Washington For Former Congressmen

Former U.S. congressmen Alan Wheat and Kenny Hulshof join Steve Kraske to talk about their current work in Washington.
Credit Vcelloho / Flickr-CC

What do you do after your congressional career is finished?

In the first part of Wednesday's Up to Date, we catch up with two former U.S. congressmen from Missouri, Alan Wheat and Kenny Holshuf, who have returned to Washington as policy advisors on behalf of a local law firm.

Guests:

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Up to Date
10:00 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Singing A Renaissance Aria

Joyce DiDonato joins Steve Kraske on Up to Date to discuss her latest role with the Lyric Opera of Kansas City.

From London to New York, Joyce DiDonato has performed on some of the world's biggest stages, but Kansas City holds a special place in her heart.

In the second part of Tuesday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with the Prairie Village native about her latest role in the Lyric Opera's The Capulets & The Montagues. Opera general director and CEO Deborah Sandler joins the conversation, too.

Guests:

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Government
9:36 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Sebelius To Stump For Possible Candidate For Kan. Governor

Former Democratic Kansas Governor Kathleen Sebelius will return to the state later this week to support a statehouse politician who's weighing a run for the governor's office.

Sebelius will be in the Kansas City area on Thursday, at an event for Democratic state Representative Paul Davis, from Lawrence. Davis has formed a committee to explore running for governor against incumbent Republican Sam Brownback.

The Kansas City Star reports that Sebelius, the current U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services, will appear at the reception in Mission Hills to support Davis.

Education
9:34 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Regents Consider Funding Plan For Kansas Universities

The Kansas Board of Regents will be talking about budget issues this week. This comes in the wake of funding cuts to higher education made earlier this year.

Writing a budget proposal for something as large and complex as the university system takes multiple steps. Mary Jane Stankiewicz with the Board of Regents says university officials have made their proposals to the board. Now the regents will work on distilling that into one plan.

“This will be a discussion and a determination of what items should be forwarded to the governor for consideration,” says Stankiewicz.

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Government
9:28 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Mo. Congressman Luetkemeyer Speaks Out On Syria And Budget

Missouri U.S. Congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer,a Republican, is blasting the Obama Administration for the way it's handled the crisis in Syria.

Luetkemeyer spoke Monday before a small group of business leaders in Jefferson City. He told them that Syrian officials used chemical weapons against their own people because they fear no repercussions from the U.S.

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Central Standard
9:27 am
Tue September 17, 2013

What Is A Bitcoin?

While any computer can be used to "mine" BitCoins, some people make specially designed hardware to increase the efficiency of their effort.
Credit Gastev / Flickr - CC

In a society where we pay bills online, transfer money via the internet, and can buy virtually anything on the web, would you be surprised to know that a currency has been developed that only exists in digital form?

BitCoin is a currency invented not by a government, or a large bank, but by a person or perhaps few people, nobody actually knows exactly who.  It has no government backing, no tie to any precious metal and is entirely unregulated.  However, on the afternoon of Monday, September 16 the exchange rate for one Bitcoin was more than 126 dollars.

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Central Standard
5:09 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Four Strategies For Dealing With Bad Bosses

Credit Victor1588 / Flickr - CC

A boss can make or break a job. Lack of manager training, promoting for the wrong reasons, and even personal character flaws have resulted in multiple "bad bosses" making the work environment for many stressful, or even toxic. According to an American Psychological Association survey, three-fourths of Americans suffer from workplace stress. And that stress can take a toll.

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