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Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

The 18th and Vine Jazz District played a crucial role in Kansas City's history as a center for African-American commerce and culture. Today, it's home to the American Jazz Museum, Black Archives of Mid-America, Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, and more.

Keith Allison / Flickr Creative Commons

If you’re a professional baseball player, the last thing you want to hear is that you’re not running correctly.  But that’s what happened to one of the star players for the Kansas City Royals.

With spring training starting this month, outfielder Lorenzo Cain is still trying to adjust his running style.

That didn’t show in Game Six of the American League Championship Series. Cain’s dash from all the way from first base to home on a single clinched the second straight American League pennant for the Kansas City Royals. 

Out Of Synch

Cuts to the crop insurance program will again be a talking point on Capitol Hill.

The budget drafted by President Obama and released Tuesday would make cuts to the crop insurance system, allocate more funds for agricultural research and fund the summer program that provides free meals to children.

Freedom, Inc.

13 hours ago

We explore the history and influence of the Kansas City political organization Freedom, Inc., one of the oldest African American political organizations in the country, and take a look at the relevance of the group in elections today.

Guests:

  • Micah Kubic, author, Freedom, Inc. and Black Political Empowerment
  • Emiel Cleaver, producer, Freedom Is Now
  • Shalonn "Kiki" Curls, Missouri State Senator

The Student Senate at the University of Kansas cut funding for the University Daily Kansan in half for the 2015-2016 school year after the newspaper published an editorial critical of the governing body. Now, the student newspaper at KU is suing the university for violating its First Amendment rights.

Guests:

The Lawrence Journal-World recently sought information on fraternity hazing from the University of Kansas under the state’s Freedom of Information Act. But the documents the newspaper received were so heavily redacted as to shed almost no light on the issue. 

Guests:

Andy Marso / Heartland Health Monitor

After three years of providing state funding for a medical research center focused on adult stem cell treatments, Kansas legislators are asking when the center will be financially independent.

Officials from the University of Kansas Medical Center’s Midwest Stem Cell Therapy Center had just presented their annual report Monday when Sen. Jeff Melcher, a Republican from Leawood, asked whether they were seeking “venture funding or any private equity to continue this once the state’s contribution to this research has ended.”

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

The Jackson County Prosecutor announced charges Tuesday in the murder of a Raytown man gunned down while jogging near Blue Ridge Boulevard and 67th Street.

Craig L. Brown, 24, faces a single count of second degree murder in the May 13, 2012, shooting death of Harry Stone, 60. Stone described the two men who’d fired at him from a passing car to an anesthesiologist before dying in surgery.

Alex O' Toole / Wikimedia -- CC

Amy Holdman has a cautionary tale for Kansas lawmakers.

The 41-year-old mother of two from Overland Park is convinced that her frequent use of tanning beds as a teenager and young adult is the reason she’s had to endure three surgeries in the past year to remove chunks of cancerous skin from both arms.

Doctors had to dig deep to remove melanoma cancer cells from her right forearm in February 2015.

In the months that followed, she underwent dozens of painful biopsies and two more scarring surgeries.

A bill being heard this week by a Missouri legislative committee promotes shared parenting – a flexible arrangement in which children spend as close to equal time as possible with each parent after separation or divorce.

The legislation proposes adding language to the state’s child custody law to emphasize that the best interest of the child is equal access to both parents – a change that would encourage judges to pay more attention to research on the best interest of children.

Courtesy Little Class Records

Julian Davis
Who Walks In, When I Walk Out? (Little Class Records)

With the first listen to Who Walks In, When I Walk Out? any roots fan is going to ask, “How old is this guy again?” The quesiton’s inevitable.

It’s also unfair. (He’s sixteen.) Julian Davis would be a wonderful discovery even if he were as old as Grandma Moses.

Tammy Worth / Heartland Health Monitor

The first time Rebecca Schunck tried to commit suicide she was 25. She called the police following a fight with her father, threatening to kill him and then herself.

Dan Margolies / Heartland Health Monitor

Steve Feinstein was superintendent of Osawatomie State Hospital from 1994 to 1998. He has a Ph.D. in psychology and got involved in mental health issues when he was hired to run a state mental hospital in eastern Oregon. Although he’s retired now, the Louisburg, Kansas, resident continues to pay close attention to what’s going on at Osawatomie, one of two state-run hospitals for the severely mentally ill. In a recent interview, he spoke to us about the Kansas hospital’s slew of recent troubles.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt toured the Metro YMCA Head Start in Kansas City, Missouri, Monday to learn more about a program that helps kids deal with trauma.

“Here’s a case where you’re investing early and trying to figure out what you can do to intervene in the life of a child that has some traumatic experience,” Blunt said after sitting in on a lesson at the Crittenton Children’s Center.

The teacher used baby dolls to show the 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds how to care for someone else.

Kansas City needs an effective public transportation system to build density, but maybe we need density to built said transportation system. As the streetcars prepare to debut next month, we discuss where this system is headed.

Guests:

  • Daniel Serda, InSite Planning, LLC
  • DuRon Netsell, Hyde Park resident
  • Bryan Stalder, Historic Northeast resident

From the singular twang of a flat-picked guitar to the tight harmonies of a bluegrass band, folk music is more than a sound — it’s an essence. Local labels Mud Stomp Records and Little Class Records work not only to preserve that essence, but to show the rest of the world what Heartland artists have to offer. 

Guests:

Courtesy Adam Dolezal

The persistent decline of honeybees has scientists scrambling to understand what’s causing the problem and how to correct it. Humans may be part of the problem.

U.S. beekeepers report losing about a third of their colonies each year and the figure increased from 2014 to 2015.

The University of Kansas is taking a bold step into the fight against cybercrime. It recently announced a $4.7 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to train a new generation of cyberdefense experts who will be dedicated to public service.

Guest:

  • Bo Luo is an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at KU and the program leader of CyberCorps.
File photo

This story was updated at 4:13 p.m.

Missouri has settled a dispute over the terms of a multibillion settlement with the big tobacco companies that has cost it tens of millions of dollars over the last dozen or so years.

Attorney General Chris Koster announced the settlement Monday, saying it will allow the state to recoup $50 million it lost in arbitration and preserve millions of dollars in future payments.

Mike Sherry / Heartland Health Monitor

Residents living just south of downtown Kansas City, Missouri, might just get a grocery store after all.

Truman Medical Centers disappointed people in and around the Beacon Hill and Longfellow neighborhoods when, in mid-2015, it nixed plans to build a supermarket on the northeast corner of 27th Street and Troost Avenue. The project had been in the works for about four years.

EG Schempf / Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art

The largest collection of Kansas City artists in the metropolitan area can be found at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art at Johnson County Community College, according to executive director Bruce Hartman.

And now, there's also a gallery exclusively devoted to artists with ties to the state of Kansas called the Kansas Focus Gallery. 

Jen Arrr / Flickr Creative Commons

 As I’m sure you heard, Chipotle will be closed on Monday, Feb. 8 from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m, for a company-wide meeting on food safety after E. coli, salmonella and norovirus were linked to illnesses at its restaurants

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

America's dairy farms are doing more with less. There are fewer dairy cows today than just a few decades ago, but today’s cows are churning out more milk than ever.

Part of the increase is due to genetics. Dairy cows have been bred to be larger, hungrier, and more productive. But that focus on genetics to produce more milk has some prominent livestock advocates ringing alarm bells.

The Top 1 Percent

When it comes to milk production, no other cow tops Gigi.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

The consolidation of school districts in Kansas is off the table at least for now. The legislation would have cut in half the number of school districts in the state. 

When the bill had a hearing in the House Education Committee, it was clear opposition was mounting from all over the state. The room was packed, many educators driving hours to testify against the bill.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Frustrations ran high at the Citizen Task Force on Violence's first listening session Saturday morning, as several dozen Kansas Citians spoke out on how to curb violence in the city.

William Thomas, a probation officer in Johnson County, summed up what many of the attendees want out of the task force: a concerted effort before its self-imposed November deadline.

Matt Hodapp / KCUR

Missouri Sen. Ryan Silvey (R-Kansas City) provides an insider perspective on the Missouri General Assembly as we discuss the urban versus rural divide, campaign contribution limits, REAL ID, and transportation.

Guests:

  • Ryan Silvey, Representative from Kansas City, Missouri General Assembly 
  • Matt Staub, Blogger
  • Elle Moxley, General Assignment Reporter, KCUR
www.flickr.com

Singer Tom Jones hit the world stage in 1965 with a bang…and although his star has faded a bit over the years, the man can still wow a crowd with his vocal prowess.  Tom Jones is featured on this week's Cyprus Avenue.

Track List:

Tom Jones - "Just Dropped In”

Tom Jones - “Run On”

Tom Jones - “Bring It On Home”

Tom Jones - “Tower Of Song”

Tom Jones - “Opportunity To Cry”

Tom Jones - “Didn’t It Rain”

Tom Jones – “Why Don’t You Love Me Like…”

Tom Jones – “Ain’t No Grave”

Tom Jones  – “Elvis Presley Blues”

Megan Hart / Heartland Health Monitor

A pilot program designed to improve the health of people with severe and persistent mental illnesses will end July 1, but its backers say it hasn’t had enough time to show results.

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Italian food isn't just pasta in red sauce or hearty slabs of lasagna.

From fish that's served very simply to bucatini alla gricia (pasta with pork jowl), Kansas City's Italian restaurants range from the old-school to places that veer towards lighter fare.

On KCUR's Central Standard, the Food Critics discussed the difference between Italian and Italian-American food — then they searched for the best Italian food in and around Kansas City.

Here are their recommendations:

Red

Feb 5, 2016

From red hearts to red sauce: In this Valentine's Day-inspired show, we start out at V's Italiano Restaurant, where many Kansas Citians have gotten engaged. Not feeling it? We also have tips for what to do when you're about to cry in a restaurant (and yes, we've all done it). Then, KCUR's Food Critics uncover the best Italian food in Kansas City.

Guests:

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