leadership

The Kauffman Foundation has released a list identifying 222 people who they consider the real leaders of Kansas City. And, for the most part, these leaders aren't the mayor or the chief of police ... So who are they?

Plus, recent hurricanes and earthquakes in Puerto Rico and Mexico have many wondering what to do, perhaps especially those who hail from those regions. What it's like to wait for information, and attempt to help from afar.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Julián Zugazagoitia came to Kansas City in 2010, to take a job as CEO and director of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. The new guy from Mexico by way of New York and Paris made a fast impression as a lanky intellectual with a worldly resume and a lot of energy.

The Midwest made an equally large impression on him.

"Coming to the Midwest definitely was as foreign a country as I have ever been," he jokes.

Kansas City initially felt like a tiny village.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Despite decades of government assistance, violent crime continues in too many American neighborhoods. That's why Bob Woodson, founder of the Woodson Center, thinks the solution for troubled communities must come from local leaders themselves, not from the federal or state level.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Principal Anthony Madry stands in a noisy hallway at Central Academy of Excellence, greeting students.

“Good morning, good morning, good morning,” Madry says, fist bumping students as they pass. “Hey are we good?”

The student nods. “Yeah.”

Madry points to a young woman. “That’s Emily. Emily’s one of the best kids I have in this school. She’s one of my favorites. Don’t blush, please don’t blush.

“You try to learn most of the kids’ names, the reason being that’s the most honorable thing you can do,” Madry says.

We've all had great bosses ... and not-so-great bosses. But what makes them that way? A Mizzou professor is casting aside assumptions that we've been making about management.

In economics, only 30% of Ph.Ds are women. But in our area, some of the biggest names in economics are women. How two local professors have influenced national politics — and ruffled a few feathers— with their research and thought.

Guests:

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

The Lee’s Summit R-7 School District will pay Hickman Mills Supt. Dennis Carpenter $235,000 for the 2017-18 school year.

That’s more than Carpenter’s current $185,000 base salary, but it’s substantially less than his predecessor, David McGehee, was making. With a compensation package of $395,000, McGehee was the top paid administrator in the state of Missouri when he resigned last year.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

There will be a political shift in the Kansas legislature with the new leaders lawmakers selected Monday. Conservatives will hold on to the very top jobs for 2017, but more moderate Republicans also picked up key positions. There is turnover among some of the Democratic leadership posts too.

All the change reflects gains made by moderate Republicans in the August primaries, and gains by Democrats in November, especially in the House. The move to the center on the Senate side is more subtle, but nonetheless notable.

“Elections have consequences and this election pretty much showed it’s going to be a fairly blended leadership team,” said Rep. Dan Hawkins, a conservative Republican from Wichita who lost a bid for leadership job.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

It’s a campaign without ads. There are no TV spots or mailers. The only people voting are the 165 Kansas lawmakers choosing their new leaders.

“Leadership races are the most inside of inside baseball,” says University of Kansas political scientist Burdett Loomis.

Loomis says you almost have to be a legislative nerd to have heard of the candidates for Kansas House speaker or Senate president, but they get to make committee assignments and control the chamber.

Alex Smith / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City Mayor Sly James is exploring a new program to empower parents of school-aged children.

The Parent Leadership Training Institute is a 20-week program that helps attendees track legislation, analyze data and become involved in public policy on behalf of their kids.

James says highly engaged parents help schools function better, but knowing how to participate isn't always obvious.

Nearly everyone agrees that parental involvement is critical to kids' success in school, but knowing how to participate isn't always obvious. Kansas City Mayor Sly James supports a program aimed at giving parents the tools they need to engage with schools, and affect positive change in their children's future.

Guests:

Most people have experience with a boss or manager who was less than inspiring. Former Kansas state Rep. Ed O'Malley, who heads up the Kansas Leadership Center in Wichita, says leadership is an activity, not a role, and should not be limited to those in high places.

Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin has written about  some of the the most powerful people in the world. She shares with Steve Kraske leadership lessons from the White House. 

Doris Kearns Goodwin will speak with Bill Moyers at 6 p.m. Saturday, November 14 at Unity Temple on the Plaza as part of an event sponsored by the Truman Library Institute. General admission is sold out.

The Women's Foundation of Greater Kansas City

In a country where almost 51 percent of the population is female, positions of leadership in politics, education and business are largely dominated by men. On this edition of Up To Date, we discuss why women lag in leadership positions and how to reverse the trend.

Guests: 

Leadership

Nov 5, 2012
George Tames / New York Times

What are the characteristics of a leader?  Is it a constant, even temperament?  The ability to command respect?  Possessing an unwavering state of courage?

Hillary Clinton may have ran for president in 2008, and Michelle Bachmann tried to cinch the nomination this year in the GOP primaries. But the question remains: why aren't there more women in politics?

Discussing Changing Technology And Culture At KC Forum

Apr 19, 2012

Ten years ago, this was a different city.

In the last year alone, Kansas City saw a change in leadership with a new mayor, then a new Police Chief; plus, the opening of another world-class performing arts center.

So, what could this city see in another year? Another five?

President Obama's State of the Union speech was "animated by the president’s faith in government’s ability to restore the American promise of fairness" says Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian  Doris Kearns Goodwin.

flickr/flattop341

Starting a business in tough financial times can be a smart move . . . if it's worth the risk.

So, what makes a venture worth the gamble? How do you tell a good risk from a poor one?

Harvard Business School professor and Kansas native Robert Kaplan joined Tuesday's Central Standard for a discussion on leadership and risk.