Law

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Kansas’ first Veterans Treatment Court went into session in the Johnson County Courthouse on January 13, making the state the 41st in the nation to start such a program. 

The court provides veteran offenders a diversion track through the Johnson County District Attorney’s office and a probation track offered through Johnson County District Court Services. They also link veterans with programs, benefits and services for which they are eligible.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

This story is part of the NPR reporting project School Money, a nationwide collaboration between NPR’s Ed Team and 20 member station reporters exploring how states pay for their public schools and why many are failing to meet the needs of their most vulnerable students.

Updated, April 29:

There is a showdown coming in the next few days in the Kansas Supreme Court.

The high court will hear oral arguments on a school funding lawsuit filed five years ago and now just coming to a head.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

The University of Missouri-Columbia made national headlines over the past few weeks amidst rising racial tensions and resulting protests on campus.

As the conversation unfolded, a handful of terms have taken the spotlight online and in the media. Like safe space, systematic oppression and the First Amendment, to name a few.

Western culture has highly stigmatized sex work, but is it time to decriminalize the trade? Up To Date takes a look at the pros and cons of legalizing prostitution. 

Guests:

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

The situation at Mizzou has brought a bunch of potentially unfamiliar terms together in one place. Systematic oppression and safe spaces: what they mean, and their relevance on college campuses today. Also, a little clarity on the first amendment. 

Guests:

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR

A KU professor discusses how international trade has changed and transformed our economy and region.

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The story of Summer Farrar, an artist whose current project is exonerating the wrongly convicted using microscopic hair comparison analysis. How an artist ended up in the mix, and what she brings to the table.

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Eyes are on Missouri as the state's implementation of the death penalty enters national discussions. What has already shifted in approaches to challenging the death penalty, and what further developments can be expected now that celebrity Larry Flynt has been granted the right to ask for previously sealed documents from Missouri executions?  

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A grand jury's recent decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., has thrown a spotlight on the legal institution of the grand jury:

What’s the prosecutor’s role in grand jury proceedings? Who brings the charges? What are the standards of proof?

Big questions are being asked about the recent grand jury hearing about the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, for example, whether justice was served. But there are simpler questions, too: When and why is a grand jury called? What's the prosecutor's role, in a grand jury hearing and otherwise? Who are the jurors, and why is their selection process a secret?

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Courtesy of Julie Levin.

Julie Levin has worked with Legal Aid of Western Missouri since 1977.

In that time, she's had some monumental cases, from a suit against the Kansas City Housing Authority in 1989 that changed the face of public housing, to a case on behalf of a client who lost her job while on maternity leave. That last case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Family law can be a messy profession. Between acrimonious divorces and bitter custody battles, the terrain is often rocky and difficult to navigate.

In the first part of  Thursday's Up to Date, we talk with a lawyer who’s spent nearly 30 years balancing these types of battles. We’ll discuss how family lawyers stay detached from the raw emotions of their cases, why she sometimes feels like she’s a therapist for her clients, and why personal grievances should stay out of court—even in a divorce case.

What would happen if Superman had to get a warrant for his x-ray vision? Can you imagine Batman in small claims court when his batarangs damage city buildings?

Wikipedia Commmons

It may be the tipping point: among the issues of discussion after Friday's massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut: mental health and gun control.