Kansas City Star

Courtesy Barbara Shelly

More veteran journalists are leaving The Kansas City Star in the latest round of buyouts and layoffs.

Among those departing is Steve Paul, who for the past several years has overseen The Star’s editorial pages.

Paul says The Star plans to replace him and fellow editorial page writer Barbara Shelly, who also took a voluntary buyout. His immediate plans for retirement include finishing a book he's worked on for a while, about Ernest Hemingway's Kansas City.

It's an animated Disney film about the first rabbit on the police force. But it also addresses issues of politics, race, gender, stereotyping and xenophobia. We hear how the politics of Zootopia mirror Kansas City, and how the first Latina columnist for The Kansas City Star relates to that bunny cop.

Guests:

Nightryder84 / Wikimedia--CC

The Kansas City Star laid off five more newsroom employees Monday.

Alan Bavley, Brian Burnes, James Fussell, Greg Hack and Mary Schulte were all let go.

Bavley reported on health care. Burnes is a metro desk reporter who often wrote about Kansas City history. Fussell is a features reporter. Hack is a reporter and former assistant business editor. Schulte is a longtime photo editor.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Growing up, Tony Berg remembers the excitement of getting the newspaper.

"That was how we got news. I remember every day, go out to the driveway and it was like Christmas," he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard.

And for Berg, being the new publisher of The Kansas City Star is a dream job.

“I feel like this is my hometown and this is my hometown paper,” he said.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Updated, 2:15 p.m. Friday:

At least five journalists have taken voluntary buyouts from the Kansas City Star.

Those departing include editorial page editor Steve Paul, columnist Barb Shelly, theater critic and arts reporter Robert Trussell and assistant sports editor Mark Zeligman.

It was the first newspaper he ever read, and he now considers himself its ambassador. Meet the new publisher of The Kansas City Star.

Guest:

How does design influence the way we absorb information? Three local design experts weigh in on the redesign of The Kansas City Star — and on how good and bad design affects our lives.

Guests:

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Mará Rose Williams is a reporter for The Kansas City Star. And though her beat is technically higher education, for Williams, it's all about love.

"I really love people," she says. "And my job, I look at it as an opportunity every day to fall in love."

She says that when she meets someone whose story she loves, it gives her the same euphoric feeling as a romantic flame being kindled.

For example, there was the girl she covered who was blind, and wanted to run track for her middle school.

Wikipedia Commons/K.C. Star

The Kansas City Council will vote next week on extending the tax abatement on the Kansas City Star's printing plant for another 15 years. 

A council committee endorsed the extension, though an advisory board did not.

The Chapter 353 Advisory Board said tough times in the newspaper industry notwithstanding, the Star received the 10-year tax abatement in the spirit of the law involved:  to end blight at 15th and Oak streets. 

With the building in place, the board said, the blight is now gone and the newspaper is not entitled to any more tax relief.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansas City Star editor Mike Fannin makes decisions every day about what this community is going to know about itself, the region and even the world. In a changing news environment, with financial and staffing constraints, The Star, along with many news organizations, has been forced to examine its guiding principles and priorities.

Americasroof/Google Images -- CC

How is the Kansas City Star adapting to the changing media environment? Editor Mike Fannin discusses the challenges of reaching readers, the redesign of the digital and print editions and the future of the newsroom.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

When Corinne Corley, 60, moved to Brookside two decades ago, her morning Kansas City Star came around 5:30.

“Now, it comes between 6:30 and 7,” says Corley, clutching her cup of coffee as she reads the headlines on her tablet. She has a digital subscription to the New York Times, but she still gets the Star delivered to her door.

“There’s just something about the feel of a newspaper in your hand,” she says.

Her paper arrives with a thud around 6:25 a.m. Corley waves to her carrier.

Judith E. Bell / Flickr-CC

The Kansas City Star has been targeted by a nationwide billing scam, according to Star editors.

The paper has been publishing a warning box in its print edition cautioning readers to disregard any renewal notices asking for money to be sent to Oregon or Nevada.

Kansas City Star designer Charles Gooch sits in the center of the newsroom, surrounded by televisions. He knows that this is going to be one of the front pages that people save for posterity.

“A lot of my friends on Twitter tell me no pressure, that they want to see the definitive A1 that they can put in their files and hang up on their walls,” Gooch says.

It’s the bottom of the 8th, Royals are winning 2-1, and Gooch is staring at a blank page with just the masthead. He’s getting the rest of the paper designed, so he’s ready as soon as the game ends.

Teemu008 / Creative Commons, Flickr

Former Kansas City Star columnist Bill Tammeus, who still blogs for the paper, recently released a memoir titled Woodstock: A Story of Middle Americans.

It's about his boyhood in the Illinois town of Woodstock, in the middle of the 20th century. Through critical reflection on his early experiences and observations, Tammeus arrives at a handful of truisms about life in the Midwest, offered without sentimentality or rose-colored glasses, but with measured fondness.

Pabo76 / Flickr-CC

Kielbasa, carnitas and pulled pork — are you getting hungry? Some local restaurants are proving that Kansas City isn’t just a barbecue town. 

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we take a look at highlights and hidden gems featured in the Kansas City Star’s Food Issue.

Guest:

  • Jill Silva, food editor at The Kansas City Star

The Kansas City Star recently changed the way visitors to their website can comment on stories. Commentors must now login to the system using a Facebook account, and their comments will be displayed using the name and photograph attached to that account.

"Facebook has a vested interest in making sure that the people using Facebook are real people," says Derek Donovan, public editor at the Kansas City Star. "This site is, or at least tries to be aggressive about weeding out fake accounts and also spamming accounts."

Live Music For A Living

Sep 12, 2012
Kansas City Star

If you spend any amount of time going to concerts or music shows in Kansas City, you’ve probably seen a tall, thin man with a shock of grey hair usually standing by himself, often near the back of the club.

Requiem For A Heavyweight

Apr 27, 2012
Photo courtesy of the Walt Bodine Family

Walt Bodine's final show has inspired a lot of emotions and fond farewells, including this haiku from longtime listener Greg Hack.

Steve Rose: A Changing Johnson County

Mar 29, 2012

Is the relationship between Johnson County and Kansas City, Missouri as tense as the one between Jayhawks and Tigers?  Is "Lexus Land" still an appropriate nickname for Johnson County?

Glass Shell Damaged At Sprint Center

Mar 7, 2012

Two large panes of glass that make up the outer wall of the Kansas City Sprint Center broke today, as the Big 12 men’s basketball tournament was set to begin.

Whether it's the opening of a beacon of the performing arts, a shopping mall revived from near death, a business fleeing one side of the state for the other, or a law firm's attempt to build a new office structure on the Country Club Plaza, it's been a busy year in development across the Kansas City region.