Kansas City Star

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The executive director of the Kansas City Symphony is a busy man, but Frank Byrne has carved out some time for Up To Date. Today, he leads us through a Shostakovich symphony he's been listening to a lot lately. Then, we learn about the reporting, the writing, and the living Ernest Hemingway did in Kansas City during his 18th year of life.

File Photo By Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

The owner of The Kansas City Star has decided not to sell the newspaper’s massive green-glass production plant overlooking downtown after all.

What does the college campus of the future look like? An architect from a local firm sees some radically different changes.

Then: a recent article in The Kansas City Star says that the social scene here isn't inclusive of people of color. We'll hear how some young African-Americans don't feel like there's a place for them in the metro ... and how it's driving them to move elsewhere.

Guests:

3D Development

The sale of The Kansas City Star building is expected to be completed Thursday, although the new owner has no immediate plans to redevelop the historic property at 1729 Grand Blvd.

“I’ve worked a little over a year on the transaction so I’m excited to complete the acquisition,” says Vince Bryant of 3-D Development.

“The good news is, it’s a big facility. We’re exploring possibilities as low volume as storage or a data center. On the big side would be higher end office.”

Danie Alexander / KCUR 89.3

Summer is just about over and seasonal crops like zucchini, tomatoes and peppers are ripe for the picking. Today, Flint Hills resident and friend of the show Cindy Hoedel bravely attempts to teach host Steve Kraske the tricks and skills for cooking a proper ratatouille — without burning down the house! Then, we get an update on her life in the rural Flint Hills.

Oven-Roasted Ratatouille

Serves 8-10

Roasted vegetables:

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City Star reporters are being given new assignments as part of parent company McClatchy Inc.’s “reinvention” of newsrooms across the newspaper chain.

The health beat has been transformed into the “bad medicine” beat, the education beat into “raising Kansas City” and the crime beat into “courts uncovered,” to cite three examples.

Jen Chen / KCUR 89.3

Last fall, after he was laid off from The Kansas City Star, Yael Abouhalkah did what many journalists do: he started a blog and continued to cover local and national politics.

That is, until couple of weeks ago, when he announced that he and his wife are heading to Namibia to be Peace Corps volunteers.

They’re leaving mid-August for a 27-month stint in southwest Africa.

The NAACP of Missouri has issued its first-ever travel advisory for the state, warning of harassment and discrimination. A look at whether Missouri is safe for people of color ... and whether safety related to race, religion, gender identity or sexual orientation is something that people think about when planning their travels.

Wikimedia Commons/Kansas City Star

When it opened in 2006, The Kansas City Star Press Pavilion was hailed as a major contribution to the revitalization of downtown and the latest technology in the newspaper industry.

The striking 434,000-square-foot building clad in green glass and copper covered two city blocks, rising from four stories along 17th Street to its eight-story prow above the South Loop freeway.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

The Kansas City Star’s historic headquarters building at 1729 Grand Blvd. has been sold to a local developer who wants to redevelop the property as a first-class office project for up to 1,200 workers.

On Friday, The Star’s parent company, Sacramento-based McClatchy, announced it had sold the historic property and the 11-year-old Press Pavilion across McGee Street for a combined $42 million.

Claire Tadokoro / KCUR 89.3

There have been some hits and some misses during President Donald Trump's first 100 days in office. One thing everyone agrees on is there has been no shortage of surprises. Today, we hear from a distinguished panel of political observers; ABC News analyst Matthew Dowd, Time magazine editor-at-large David Von Drehle, and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial writer Colleen Nelson, of the Kansas City Star. They discuss the early days of the new executive administration.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

The owner of The Kansas City Star has a tentative agreement to sell the newspaper’s headquarters at 1729 Grand Blvd., since 1911 a downtown landmark where a young Ernest Hemingway once reported.

Wylie "Cyote" C / Wikimedia Commons

In such a divided era in America, is respect for different faiths critical to the country's success? A former member of President Obama's Faith Advisory Council answers that question. Then, trout season begins on March 1 and there's no better place in Missouri to ring it in than Bennett Spring State Park, outside Lebanon.

Glenn McCoy / Belleville News-Democrat / Universal Press Syndicate

You might know their opinions — even if you don't know their names.

Political cartoons are a fixture that appear alongside news stories and editorials, providing humorous and absurd commentary on issues and current events.

Cartoonists Lee Judge and Glenn McCoy told Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann that political cartoons have a special place in the world of media.

Lee Judge / Kansas City Star

A week and a half into the Trump administration, we'll find out whether political cartoonists still think of this president as a gift to satire.

Plus, we check in with Lawrence musician Matt Pryor, whose band The Get Up Kids had a big following in the 1990s.

Guests:

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Over concerns about the exclusivity of the local tech scene, one Kansas City man wants to create a startup community near the 18th and Vine District for minority entrepreneurs. We also hear from a former Kansas City Star writer about her life in the Flint Hills and the transition to new work.

Courtesy The Kansas City Star

My last encounter with Charles Gusewelle was early in 2015. He was trying to reach me by phone and I was on a weekend getaway to Key West. But I found his mysterious message — we weren’t fast friends, and I had no idea why he was calling — and returned the call. Of course, he was on deadline — this was a Saturday afternoon when I reached him. And the Sunday column he’d drafted was about me. Really?

I found that column this morning after learning that Gus had died, at 83, early Tuesday.

It's not a new story: newspapers are in flux. Recently, Yael Abouhalkah, a longtime Kansas City Star journalist, was laid off; he was one of only two editorial writers at the paper.

What is the significance of the newspaper editorial — especially in a time when nearly everyone can broadcast their opinion online? And how are layoffs affecting newsrooms nationwide?

Plus, Question Quest sifts through the legend and superstition to find the true story behind the Black Angel in Iowa City, Iowa.

And then there was one.

Lewis Diuguid, a longtime member of The Kansas City Star’s editorial board, will be departing the paper along with veteran Yael Abouhalkah, who was laid off this week.

Diuguid has told friends that he intends to step down on Oct. 7, Abouhalkah’s last day at The Star.

Technically, that would leave The Star’s editorial board with only one member: newly minted publisher Tony Berg.

Longtime Kansas City Star editorial writer Yael T. Abouhalkah was laid off today, Abouhalkah said in a Twitter posting.

The Kansas City Star laid off another dozen employees Monday, the latest round of cuts and buyouts at the newspaper over the last few months.

The laid-off employees included copy and web editors, several people in marketing and longtime outdoors editor Brent Frazee, a 36-year veteran of the newspaper.

The new round of reductions follows voluntary buyout offers and layoffs in March that shrank the newsroom by at least 10 employees.

  In this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors, joined by Angie Blumel of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault, wade through the controversy surrounding an editorial in The Kansas City Star that encouraged rape victims to "accept [their] role in what happened." We also look at the impact violent images in the media have, and whether or not the political process is "rigged" to exclude the wishes of regular voters.

 Guests:

KCUR 89.3

A column published Friday evening in The Kansas City Star website (and in the print edition Saturday) has been removed from The Star’s website, after backlash from the community and other media outlets.

The column, titled “Women can take action to prevent rapes,” argues that women should take responsibility for their bodies by not getting so intoxicated that they become victims of sexual assault or rape.

That elicited strong reactions on Facebook and Twitter.

Courtesy Barbara Shelly

More veteran journalists are leaving The Kansas City Star in the latest round of buyouts and layoffs.

Among those departing is Steve Paul, who for the past several years has overseen The Star’s editorial pages.

Paul says The Star plans to replace him and fellow editorial page writer Barbara Shelly, who also took a voluntary buyout. His immediate plans for retirement include finishing a book he's worked on for a while, about Ernest Hemingway's Kansas City.

It's an animated Disney film about the first rabbit on the police force. But it also addresses issues of politics, race, gender, stereotyping and xenophobia. We hear how the politics of Zootopia mirror Kansas City, and how the first Latina columnist for The Kansas City Star relates to that bunny cop.

Guests:

Nightryder84 / Wikimedia--CC

The Kansas City Star laid off five more newsroom employees Monday.

Alan Bavley, Brian Burnes, James Fussell, Greg Hack and Mary Schulte were all let go.

Bavley reported on health care. Burnes is a metro desk reporter who often wrote about Kansas City history. Fussell is a features reporter. Hack is a reporter and former assistant business editor. Schulte is a longtime photo editor.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Growing up, Tony Berg remembers the excitement of getting the newspaper.

"That was how we got news. I remember every day, go out to the driveway and it was like Christmas," he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR's Central Standard.

And for Berg, being the new publisher of The Kansas City Star is a dream job.

“I feel like this is my hometown and this is my hometown paper,” he said.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Updated, 2:15 p.m. Friday:

At least five journalists have taken voluntary buyouts from the Kansas City Star.

Those departing include editorial page editor Steve Paul, columnist Barb Shelly, theater critic and arts reporter Robert Trussell and assistant sports editor Mark Zeligman.

It was the first newspaper he ever read, and he now considers himself its ambassador. Meet the new publisher of The Kansas City Star.

Guest:

How does design influence the way we absorb information? Three local design experts weigh in on the redesign of The Kansas City Star — and on how good and bad design affects our lives.

Guests:

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