Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

He’s an internationally-known food writer and photographer, an attorney and a former Congressional aide to Sam Brownback.

She’s the communications director at Planned Parenthood Great Plains, and her career has also included time as a competitive figure skater and as a local TV news anchor.

And they also happen to be siblings.

An awesome snapshot of Kansas City is more than just picking an iconic location. Up to Date host Steve Kraske talks with three professional photographers who say  making a great photo takes plenty of preparation, a good plan and, in some cases, a tiny hexacopter.


Longtime Kansas City Star editorial writer Yael T. Abouhalkah was laid off today, Abouhalkah said in a Twitter posting.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

They're a Northland brother and sister who have traveled the world — he as a food writer and photographer, she in a career that's included time as an Olympic figure skater and a local TV news anchor. We chat with Bonjwing and Bonyen Lee in a family Portrait Session show.


An interview with the outgoing managing editor of The Pitch, who's leaving town to write about the craft beer industry at Brewbound. We hear his take on KC's beer scene, which he covered for The Pitch, plus his assessment of the state of journalism here.


  • Justin Kendall
Henry Grossman

With their cameras, the best photographers can change how we see and think about the world around us. For more than 50 years, Henry Grossman has made portraits of cultural and political  legends, including The Beatles, Muhammad Ali and President John F. Kennedy.

Before public officials in Platte County, Missouri, make a plan for spending tax dollars, they know it'll have to pass the muster of Ivan Foley, editor and publisher of The Landmark. That's why he was awarded the 2016 Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, tenacity and integrity in rural journalism.

Last month, the Simons family sold the Lawrence Journal-World after 125 years of local ownership. Now, the other shoe has dropped. We talk with one of the 30 staffers who was laid off last week. What does it mean for Lawrence and for the future of journalism?


  • Karen Dillon, journalist

Since 1983 Alfred Friendly Press has offered fellowships to journalists from developing countries and emerging markets to spend six months working at U.S. host news organizations.  Up to Date's Steve Kraske talks with three Fellows who remind us that freedom of the press is not a right to be taken for granted. 



At one point, the Lawrence Journal-World was known for its innovative cable and web ventures, long before other newspapers. But after 125 years, the Simons family is selling the paper to a company that's based in West Virginia.

We explore the impact that this particular family business has had in Lawrence ... as well as what it means for coverage of local and state issues.


David Greene has reported on everything from the White House to the Arab Spring to post-Soviet Russia. It all started with his high school newspaper and a lot of help along the way. Even his wife made sacrifices for his career, but Greene says it’s paid off. Now he's co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition.

David Greene is in town for KCUR’s benefit event 'RadioActive' on June 10. Tickets are no longer available.

Jad Abumrad, co-host and producer of RadioLab, says when he got his start, he didn't know what good radio was supposed to sound like. Maybe that explains how his program was able to transform the medium. Whatever your project, it's important to embrace the anxiety — Abumrad calls it "gut churn" — that comes along with the creative process.

Becoming a grandparent can have vivid effects on a person. Journalist Lesley Stahl's new book, Becoming Grandma, explores the evolution of close relationships, personal transformation, and the intense joy that came over her when she held her grand-daughters for the first time.

Neighborhood Radio

Apr 12, 2016

Two local organizations are gearing up to start low-power FM stations to broadcast to specific communities within a 3-5 mile radius of the broadcast location. One of them, broadcasting from the Mutual Musicians Foundation, will focus on local jazz, gospel and soul at 18th and Vine. The other has an educational and community service mission. What's the story?


  • Lewis George Walker, co-founder, KUAW 98.5 FM
  • James McGee, general manager, KOJH 104.7
Meg Hilling / Twitter

Missouri Journalism student Meg Hilling didn't hear the explosion Tuesday morning at Brussels' Maelbeek metro station. But by the time she got to the office of Politico, where she is interning this semester, she saw "tons of police officers and ambulances" streaming toward the station just a few blocks away. 

"It's very surreal," Hilling says. "You see events like this on TV. All morning long all we've heard are sirens and police whistles." 

The Student Senate at the University of Kansas cut funding for the University Daily Kansan in half for the 2015-2016 school year after the newspaper published an editorial critical of the governing body. Now, the student newspaper at KU is suing the university for violating its First Amendment rights.


The Lawrence Journal-World recently sought information on fraternity hazing from the University of Kansas under the state’s Freedom of Information Act. But the documents the newspaper received were so heavily redacted as to shed almost no light on the issue. 


Confidence in the media to report news fairly and accurately is at an all-time low, according to a 2014 Gallup poll and events at the University of Missouri last week made it clear that protesters did not want journalists on the scene. We examine how Americans view the media.


Alyson Raletz / KCUR

These days, it’s hard to find someone who has stayed at one job longer than a decade. For many, exciting opportunities draw them to different companies and new careers.

But for Wendy Guillies, the last 15 years with the Kauffman Foundation have been anything but boring.

UPDATE (5:30 pm): Late Tuesday afternoon, MU Communications professor Melissa Click released a statement apologizing for her "language and strategies" in confronting reporters on Carnahan Quad on the Mizzou campus. 

"[I] sincerely apologize to the MU campus community, and journalists at large, for my behavior, and also for the way my actions have shifted attention away from the students' campaign for justice. From this experience I have learned about humanity and humility." 

Pixabay / Creative Commons

As KCUR gears up for a Podcast Party, the Audiofiles recommend a history series that digs into strange stories from the past culled from small town newspapers, a bunch of comedians making fun of bad movies, politicians in the laid-back podcast format accidentally confessing to being robots, and more.


Paul Andrews /

Mará Rose Williams is a reporter for The Kansas City Star. And though her beat is technically higher education, for Williams, it's all about love.

"I really love people," she says. "And my job, I look at it as an opportunity every day to fall in love."

She says that when she meets someone whose story she loves, it gives her the same euphoric feeling as a romantic flame being kindled.

For example, there was the girl she covered who was blind, and wanted to run track for her middle school.

Paper Source

Oct 9, 2015
Paul Andrews

A Kansas City Star reporter talks about falling in love with her story subjects, her path into journalism and motherhood.


  • Mará Rose Williams, education reporter and parenting columnist, Kansas City Star

A panel of local journalists discusses the history of women in media and challenges that they've faced.


Papal Report

Sep 22, 2015

As Pope Francis heads to the Unites States, the Kansas City-based National Catholic Reporter gears up for a big three days. The story and editorial philosophy of the paper, including a new approach to covering a new pope. Bonus: a papal relic in Strawberry Hill.


  • Dennis Coday, editor, National Catholic Reporter
  • Caitlin Hendel, CEO, National Catholic Reporter
Julie Denesha / KCUR

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, Kansas Citians who responded to the storm share memories and perspectives. We also retrace the musical pipeline from New Orleans to Kansas City.


  • Dan Verbeck, retired broadcaster who covered the storm live, KMBZ and KCUR
  • Micah Herman, Kansas City jazz musician
  • Loren Pickford, New Orleans jazz musician

Kansas Representative Gene Suellentrop is a supporter of the Kansas budget experiment known as the "march to zero" for income taxes. In his nephew's social circles, on the east coast, that position is hard to understand. So the nephew decided to immerse himself in his uncle's world, just as a legislative session turned upside-down by budget debates got underway.


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently sparked a firestorm by naming a woman who may have been the victim of a sexual assault. On this edition of Up To Date, the Media Critics discuss the newspaper's decision. Plus, they analyze coverage of the Charleston, South Carolina, tragedy and the historic Kansas legislative session.  


Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansas City Star editor Mike Fannin makes decisions every day about what this community is going to know about itself, the region and even the world. In a changing news environment, with financial and staffing constraints, The Star, along with many news organizations, has been forced to examine its guiding principles and priorities.

Paul Andrews

Eric Wesson of The Kansas City Call says that Kansas City's black community is like Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man

"I am a man of substance," wrote Ellison's invisible narrator, "of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids -- I may even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me."

Wesson read those words for the first time in sixth grade, but didn't relate to them until he was in his 20s, at which point, he said to himself, 'Oh, I get it. We're here, but nobody sees us or pays attention to us.'"