journalism

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently sparked a firestorm by naming a woman who may have been the victim of a sexual assault. On this edition of Up To Date, the Media Critics discuss the newspaper's decision. Plus, they analyze coverage of the Charleston, South Carolina, tragedy and the historic Kansas legislative session.  

Guests:

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansas City Star editor Mike Fannin makes decisions every day about what this community is going to know about itself, the region and even the world. In a changing news environment, with financial and staffing constraints, The Star, along with many news organizations, has been forced to examine its guiding principles and priorities.

Paul Andrews

Eric Wesson of The Kansas City Call says that Kansas City's black community is like Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man

"I am a man of substance," wrote Ellison's invisible narrator, "of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids -- I may even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me."

Wesson read those words for the first time in sixth grade, but didn't relate to them until he was in his 20s, at which point, he said to himself, 'Oh, I get it. We're here, but nobody sees us or pays attention to us.'"

Paul Sableman / Flickr

LaShonda Katrice Barnett remembers going out with a quarter to buy the latest issue of The Call for her grandmother. Now, Barnett has written a novel about the trailblazing founder of a fictional African-American newspaper called Jam on the Vine. If it resembles The Call, that's no coincidence. 

Guest:

  • LaShonda Katrice Barnett, author, Jam on the Vine

In 1915, a famous director and an aggressive journalist battled over the inherent racism in the film, The Birth of a Nation. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with author Dick Lehr about the controversy behind this influential and infamous film. 

Guest:

From the killing of a Jordanian pilot to the death of an American aid worker, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria continues to dominate world headlines. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with journalist George Packer about ISIS, America’s continuing involvement in Iraq, and his work covering regions of conflict. 

Guest:

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

If we are all "Charlie" in the wake of an armed assault on the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, no one has earned that solidarity more than political cartoonists. A left-leaning cartoonist and his conservative counterpart weigh in on the risks and rewards of taking a bold stance. In the course of doing a job intended to provoke, are there lines they do not cross?

    

Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric and Christiane Amanpour shattered the glass ceiling when they broke into the boys' club of TV news. These gifted journalists transformed the way Americans view the news.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with the author of a new book that examines the struggles these women faced on their path to the anchor chair. We look at the individual strengths that shaped them and pushed them to success, and what their legacies will be. 

Guest:

National World War I Museum

For many families in America during World War I, newspaper reports were their only connection with loved ones serving in the trenches. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with a journalism historian and an archivist from the World War I museum about the life of journalists reporting from the front lines during the Great War.

Steve Mays / blog.missourinet.com

Bob Priddy is one of the most highly respected journalists in Missouri. He has spent forty years covering the governors, senators and lawmakers that have passed through the Capitol building.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with the recently retired news director of Missourinet about the ins and outs of politics in Jefferson City, what drew him to reporting, and his thoughts on the Senate's decision to boot the news media to the basement. 

Guest:

Johnson, A. J., Johnson's New Illustrated Family Atlas, (1864 Johnson and Ward edition) / public domain

Bistate tax proposals. Sports rivalries. Competing school districts and business poaching. So much of what happens in Kansas City comes down to our location on a state line. But we're not alone. Tune in for a roundtable of reporters from cities on state lines. 

Guests:

Esther Honig, Before and After

A young Kansas City journalist named Esther Honig, who contributes to KCUR, had an idea for a project.

She sent a simple, straightforward portrait of herself to Photoshoppers around the globe with a request to make her beautiful. She wanted to see what that would mean to people in different parts of the world, investigating how culturally specific definitions of beauty might play into the results.

deanstarkman.com

Following the 2008 financial meltdown, many were left asking, "where were the journalists at?" 

On the second half of Wednesday's Up to Date, host Steve Kraske discusses the lack of investigative journalism in recent years with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dean Starkman

Guest:

You’re in Washington, and you’ve got the plum assignment—covering the White House. You might get to ride on Air Force One and travel the world with the president, but is it really as glamorous as it sounds?

On Monday's Up to Date, we talk with NPR’s Tamara Keith and Bloomberg’s Margaret Talev about their experiences as White House correspondents. We discuss the challenges and the excitement of reporting on the president, and what it’s like to be in that briefing room.

Guests:

Alyson Raletz/KCUR

 The line between individual social media activity and employment status isn’t a clear one, according to feedback we received this week from listeners.

When we asked “Should your boss be able to fire you for what you tweet?” on the air and online, the responses showed the issue of social media and the workplace as a divisive one in Kansas City.  

We received many emphatic yeses, citing personal responsibility.

From a manufactured media circus, to a desperate game of cat-and-mouse with a serial killer, Hollywood sure knows how to romanticize journalism.

On Friday's Up to Date, DVD Gurus Mitch Brian and Jason Heck join us to talk about some of their favorite films that feature reporters. We'll dive into some thrilling vampire conspiracies, reports gone wrong, and others that are sure to set off the investigator in everyone.

He's famous for his work in the Washington Post exposing the Watergate scandal, and journalist Bob Woodward is still addressing contentious issues. 

In the second part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we get his views on the Affordable Care Act and how Washington works today. 

Guest:

Bob Woodward, journalist. His latest book is The Price of Politics.

John Hockenberry is the holder of four Emmy awards, four Peabody awards and a whole lot of distinction for his reporting over the years in places as far-flung as Somalia, Iraq, Lebanon, Jerusalem and Tehran.