Identity

Netflix

The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why has received praise and criticism for how it approaches weighty topics such as teen bullying, sexuality, mental illness and suicide. Today we speak with psychologist Wes Crenshaw, who says the drama can encourage important discussions between parents and their children.

Drenaline / Wikimedia Commons

It's a long haul from Kansas City, Kansas, to Kanorado, but driving west on Interstate 70 doesn't have to be boring. Today, we learn about some of the quirky sights and stops to enjoy while traveling the highway's 424 miles in Kansas.

Then, coming out as gay is hard enough, but it can be even more difficult for older men in rural settings. We hear the story of an Iowa psychiatrist who came out after 18 years of heterosexual marriage.

Baylor University

Not every undocumented migrant crossing our southern border makes it. Remains of those who die in the attempt are found in the open and in unmarked graves. Meet the anthropologist using forensics to return skeletal remains to waiting families. Then KU's Lisa McLendon says "it's all about attitude" when it comes to grammar. Her passion for sentence structure and punctuation led her to write a workbook about it.

Flickr-CC

It can be hard for parents to have a genuine talk with their teen-aged children without it ending up as awkward, emotional, or even worse, unproductive. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw discusses what is, and isn't, valid in a conversation with your teen.

NPR

In conjunction with NPR's A Nation Engaged, we're asking people from across the region what they want the new president to know about themselves and their communities. Then, we preview an upcoming Conversation at the Square about the relationship between education and neighborhoods.

themonastery.org

Life can be difficult for people who don't fit into societal constructs of "male" and "female," but changing approaches, especially among young people, to gender identity and sexual preference are having an effect. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw and a local transgender student discuss the challenges associated with growing up outside traditional conventions, and provide some strategies for coping.

How an Argentinean Catholic boy grew up to be a gay Jewish rabbi, and what brought him to the Midwest. Rabbi Javier Cattapan shares his journey and responds to the recent vandalism at the Kansas City public library, which included a red swastika and racist slur.

Also, in an encore broadcast, KU professor David Roediger, a leading scholar of "white studies," joins us to critically explore what it means to be white.

Guests:

Thomas Leuthard / Flickr-CC

Media critic Jay Rosen has been writing about evidence-based vs. accusation-driven journalism for years. Rosen joins us, along with a few local thinkers, in conversation about what's at stake for journalism, and what's next, as we head into a Trump presidency.

In conjunction with NPR's A Nation Engaged project, Native people answer the question, "What it means to you be an American now." Then, we find out why George Washington may not have agreed with the United State's role as policeman to the world. Finally, President of the Kansas Senate, Susan Wagle, gives us the inside story about what's going on with that state's tax revenues.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

We explore why the world of science fiction is a battleground for issues of race, gender and identity — and why that field of battle is here in KC over the next few days at the World Science Fiction Convention.

Guests:

As NPR's first African-American female host, Michele Norris is no stranger to having tough, meaningful conversations. As curator of The Race Card Project, Norris asks people to express their thoughts about race and identity in six words, which turn out to be more powerful than she expected.

What does it mean to be masculine in the 21st century? A presenter at KU's conference on masculinity and the curator of an art exhibit about the construction of masculinity across cultures and time share their thoughts.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Imagine it's 8 p.m. on a Saturday in the mid-1970s.

You're starting the engine of a 1966 Chevrolet Caprice, big block engine, 4-speed manual transmission with a vinyl interior. 

All is dark and quiet in town, but the main square is lit with activity. For perspective, it looks and sounds kind of like American Graffiti — engines revving, music pouring out of open windows, there's hollering and laughter. Cars are lined up, bumper to bumper. For the rest of the night, you're cruising.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

The Kansas City metropolitan area is almost equally divided geographically and population-wise between two states —Missouri and Kansas.

But how does this state-divide define us as individuals within the community?

Medical problems, gender identity or varied abilities that put children out of the mainstream can bring overwhelming challenges for the individual and their family. In the first part of Monday's Up to Datewe take a look at how this struggle forms identities for the children and the parents.

Guest:

  • Andrew Solomon, author of Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity

What Does It Mean To Be A Man?

Sep 12, 2013
Caza_no_7 / Flickr - CC

If you were to imagine a man in your mind's eye, what would he look like? What would he sound like? How would he act? In Western culture, the idea of a man provokes thoughts of ruggedness, strength, leadership-- someone unemotional, but powerful. While some of these characteristics are true, they could not apply to every man. But are they altogether outdated, or even false? 

K-Step www.k-step.org / Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project

People who are transgender—meaning that they identify with a gender different from their biological one—face a difficult road to self-acceptance.

Truth Squad.TV

Eye scanning used to be the stuff of science fiction and spy thrillers but not anymore.

Carolyn Kaster / A/P

With the upcoming political conventions, candidates are banking not only on their platforms to win over voters, but on their personalities. 

Who Are You Really?

May 4, 2012
paurian / flickr

Are you who you say you are? Do other people see you that way? Can you be one person at home and another person at work? Is that ideal?