Hillary Clinton

Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts says the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is crucial for farmers wanting access to new and growing markets. But in the midst of the presidential campaign the deal faces an uphill battle.

Speaking on a panel at the Kansas State Fair Saturday, Roberts, who is the Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman, distinguished the TPP from other trade deals. He says the agriculture industry stands to benefit too much for it to be allowed to fail.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

Hillary Clinton brought her campaign for president to the National Baptist Convention USA in Kansas City, Missouri, on Thursday. The Democratic nominee used gospel verses and personal stories to distinguish herself from Donald Trump.

People attending the convention are almost entirely African-American, conservative, middle-aged and dressed to the nines. In her address, Clinton, a life-long Methodist, quoted scripture to knowing smiles and nods. Some audience members even recited lines along with her. 

As St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay sees it, the crowd that packed Hillary Clinton’s new local office Tuesday night could help persuade her Democratic presidential campaign to direct more attention — and resources to Missouri.

Win or lose, such action could help the state’s entire Democratic ticket.

“We need to show the support is here, to pull her over the top,’’ Slay told reporters, shortly before addressing the shoulder-to-shoulder audience that spilled onto the sidewalk outside the Clinton campaign office at 4039 Lindell Blvd.

What does the milestone of having a woman running for president in the U.S. say about our country now? Why did it take so long, and what does it mean for women moving forward?

Guests:

  • Rebecca Richardson is president of the Greater Kansas City Women’s Political Caucus.
  • Elizabeth Vonnahme  is Associate Professor of Political Science at UMKC.
  • Jean Peters-Baker is the District Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri.

Before he was a senator, Hillary Clinton's running mate Tim Kaine was governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, but his rise to power began years ago, at a place called Rockhurst High School, where he was president of the student body.

Guests:

  • Steve Miller, Jay Reardon and Keith Connor were Tim Kaine's classmates at Rockhurst High School. 
Deborah Shaar / KMUW

 A new statewide poll suggests that political change could be in the air in Kansas.

The poll by John Zogby Strategies shows 71 percent of voters surveyed gave low ratings on how the state is performing its duties.

The survey included 433 registered voters in Kansas from June 4-6, 2016 and has a margin of error of +/- 4.7 percent. Political analyst John Zogby released the findings during a Kansas Health Foundation symposium in Wichita on Friday.

Zogby says the research suggests that Kansans might feel betrayed, especially when it comes to state policy issues.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

From the Country Club District to Midtown, Independence to the West Side, to east of Prospect and north of the river, Kansas Citians on the Missouri side were voting at the crack of dawn today.

Polls opened at 6 a.m. Shelly Freeman entered her polling place at Country Club Christian Church in the dark, thanks to daylight savings time.

"Every election is important," she says. "As a woman we had to fight to get the vote."

She sees this year as exceptional — not necessarily because of the unusual level of hostile rhetoric between the candidates.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Stumping for his wife in Kansas City Friday, former President Bill Clinton drew a laugh when he said it had been an interesting election for both parties – albeit for different reasons.

“I like our reasons better,” he said.

Bill Clinton praised Hillary Clinton and her challenger, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, for sticking to the issues. He said that while the Democratic contenders agree on many points, they differ on how to achieve those goals.

“You don’t get anywhere dismissing your opponents as being opposed to the revolution,” he said.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

A long wait to see Bill Clinton ended in disappointment for many Hillary Clinton supporters after weather prevented the former president’s plane from landing in Kansas City Tuesday.

Hundreds of people showed up at the Carpenters Training facility near the Truman Sports Complex to see Clinton stump for his wife.

Liz Rider, who brought her two daughters to the political rally, says she thinks Hillary Clinton is more electable than her Democratic rival Bernie Sanders.

The variety of candidates running for President means lots of choices for the electorate.  So, what factors influence our vote? From party affiliation to electability, we look at what considerations play into our voting decisions.

Guests:

  • Patrick Miller is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas.
  • Robert Rowland is a professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas.

Chelsea Clinton has dedicated herself to inspiring young people to become involved. On this edition of Up To Date, she tells Steve Kraske about why she thinks the country's youth is ready to make change and about how lucky she feels to have grown up the daughter of a President and a Secretary of State. 

Audiofiles: Podcasts We Love — Fall 2015

Oct 20, 2015
Photo Credit: Sascha Kohlmann

Central Standard’s podcast connoisseurs take to the mic to share what podcasts deserve your time and attention. Here’s what they recommend:

 

Jeremy Bernfeld, editor of KCUR's Harvest Public Media

First, one thing needs to be made clear: Missouri is no longer a presidential bellwether state. The state’s voters haven’t sided with the national victor since 2004.

As a result, as more candidates announce their 2016 presidential bids, many activists in both major parties predict Missouri won’t be a battleground state this time, either.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Former First Lady, U.S. Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited Kansas City on Sunday June 21 where she spoke with Rainy Day Books co-owner Vivien Jennings in front of a crowd of thousands at the Midland Theatre. 

The former Secretary of State was in town to promote her memoir, 'Hard Choices.'

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Ensuring human rights for women and girls can have a stabilizing effect impact on countries and economies, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told a Kansas City audience Sunday night.

"Of course I promoted women and girls as an integrated priority within our diplomacy," says Clinton, who was in town as part of a book tour. "But I could tell people's eyes would roll in many places when I said that."

And while Clinton says she sees the rights of women in developing companies as a moral issue, she used a different sales pitch on foreign leaders.

Perhaps the trajectory of the political lives of Bill and Hillary Clinton can be understood only through the prism of their personal relationship.